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WELCOME 



Dear Friends and Colleagues, 

As I'm sure you've noticed, the theme for the Game Developers 
Conference in 2004 is "Evolve." Evolution occurs all around us, usually in 
slow and gradual steps. 

It seems, however, that evolution in the game industry occurs at an 
exponentially more rapid pace, year over year, generation over generation. 

This year's conference program features some of our industry's most 
critical and creative thinkers. They'll examine the evolutionary trends in 
game development both in specificity and granularity and lend a 
contextual framework for the larger issues affecting our industry. 

In keeping with this year's "Evolve" theme, I'd like to point out two notable 
additions to the GDC this year: 




► In conjunction with TNC Network, I encourage you to participate in the 
first Gamehotel fd GDC (Thursday, March 25th, 6-8pm, Civic Auditorium] 
to see how game culture drives today's popular culture. Guests joining 
the dialogue include award winning music video directors from Europe 
and action figure and urban vinyl artists from Hong Kong. 

►■ The GDC is proud to host many speakers from Japan each and every 
year. This year, every session will be simultaneously translated from 
Japanese to English. 

Of course, the 4th Annual Game Developers Choice Awards (Wednesday, 
March 24th, 6:30pm, Civic Auditorium] is the highlight of the GDC. Celebrate 
at the ceremony and congratulate your peers at the reception afterwards. 

GDC 2004 is a gravity point for the industry's evolution and I thank you for 
being a part of it. 

Best Wishes, 




Alan Yu 

Director 

Game Developers Conference 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

General Information 
Events & Meetings 
Track Keynotes 



3 
6 

10 



Advisory Board Bios & Recommendations 12 

Game Developers Choice Awards 21 

Independent Games Festival 22 

Game Hotel 24 

Expo Pass Sessions 25 

Media Sponsors 27 

Speakers from Japan 29 

Tutorials 31 

GDC Mobile 37 

Conference Sessions 41 

Speaker Bios 1 17 

Exhibitor Descriptions 142 

Schedule-at-a-Glance 158 




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GENERAL INFORMATION 



Attendee Services 

Bulletin Board and Message Center 

Exhibit Level 

Convention Center iPsivlf 

Sponsored by: 

i J SILICON VALLEY 

Conference & Tutorial Registration 

Street Level 

Convention Center Lobby 

► Sunday, March 21 

3-5 P m 

Registration for Giga Pass, Tutorials Only 
Pass, Upgrades, Mobile Pass, Audio Plus 
Pass, & VIP Pass Holders Only 

► Monday, March 22 

8am-4pm 

Registration for Giga Pass, Tutorials Only 
Pass, Upgrades, Mobile Plus Pass, Audio Plus 
Pass, & VIP Pass Holders Only 

Noon-4pm — All Attendees 

► Tuesday, March 23 

gam-4pm 

► Wednesday, March 24 

7:3oam-6:3opm 

► Thursday, March 25 

8:3oam-6:3opm 

► Friday, March 26 

8:3oam-3:3opm 

Expo Pass Registration 

Street Level 

Convention Center Lobby 

► Wednesday, March 24 

ioam-6:3opm 

► Thursday, March 25 

ioam-6:3opm 

► Friday, March 26 

ioam-3:3opm 

Expo Hours 

Exhibit Level, Halls 2 & 3 

Convention Center 

► Wednesday, March 24 

ii:3oam-6:3opm 

► Thursday, March 25 

ii:30am-6:3opm 

► Friday, March 26 

ii:3oam-3:3opm 

ExpoSuite Hours 

Exhibit Level, Hall 1 
Convention Center 

► Wednesday, March 24 

9am-6:3opm 

► Thursday, March 25 

9am-6:30pm 

► Friday, March 26 

9am-3:3opm 



CDC Information Booth 

Street Level 

Convention Center Lobby 

If you need help or have a question, please go 

to the GDC Information Booth located on the 

street level across from registration. The 

Information Booth is open during event hours. 

Lunch 

Lunch is for conference & tutorial 
attendees only. 

► Monday & Tuesday 

12:302pm 
Exhibit Level 
Convention Center 

► Wednesday - Friday 

1-2:30pm 

Exhibit Level & Expo Floor 
Convention Center 

Conference Associates 

The GDC has the most knowledgeable corps 
of volunteers in the industry. Whether you're 
looking for a class, a shuttle bus, or a party, 
you'll inevitably need help with something. 
That's when you'll find one of our Conference 
Associates (CA's) nearby, ready to dispense as 
much information as you can handle. Look for 
them in their special t-shirts wherever GDC 
events are taking place. 

Session Information 

Facilities 

GDC Sessions take place at the following 
locations: Convention Center, San Jose Hilton, 
the Civic Auditorium, the Marriott hotel and 
the Fairmont hotel. Conference sessions are 
open only to paid conference attendees, 
unless otherwise noted. 

Session Types 

Open to conference attendees only: 

► Lectures 

Involve one or more speakers and a speech. 

► Panels 

Involve one or more speakers with audience 
participation highly encouraged. Class sizes 
are generally limited but some are larger to 
accommodate anticipated demand. 

► Roundtables 

Open discussions on a tightly focused 
topic. Attendance is limited so arrive early 
if you want a seat. Most roundtables are 
offered more than once, so check your 
schedule for repeat times. 

► Tutorials 

Day-long intensives offered on Monday 
& Tuesday. Pre-registration is required 
for tutorials. 



► Keynotes 

Highlighted sessions are for conference 
attendees only. 

► Sponsored Sessions 

Classes sponsored by exhibiting companies 
to better deliver the nuts and bolts of their 
message to attendees. Look for 
announcements of new products and 
technologies. 

Open to all attendees: 

► Expo Pass Sessions 

Five featured sessions of general interest to 
all. Open to all attendees. See page xx for 
Expo Pass Sessions. 

► Group Gatherings 

A chance for like-minded developers to 
get together for open discussion and 
networking. All Group Gatherings are 
hosted at the IGDA booth on the Expo 
level concourse. 

Speaker Services 

Speaker Registration 

Street Level 

Convention Center Lobby 

Speaker Registration will take place in the 
Convention Center, Street Level during 
conference registration hours. Please note 
that sponsored session speakers must 
register at exhibitor registration. 

Speaker Ready Room 

Exhibit Level, Room G 

Convention Center 

All speakers may use this room to prepare 
for their conference sessions. This room is 
equipped with a computer and printer. 

Press Registration 
and Services 

Press Room 

Street Level, Room N 
Convention Center 

► Monday, March 22 

8am-4pm 

► Tuesday, March 23 

gam-4pm 

► Wednesday, March 24 

7:3oam-6:30pm 

► Thursday, March 25 

8:3oam-6:3opm 

► Friday, March 26 

8:3oam-3:3opm 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



■u- 



www.gd 



conf.com 




GENERAL INFORMATION 



Transportation 

Shuttle Buses 

For your convenience, free shuttle buses will circulate between the 
Convention Center and the following GDC Hotels: 

• Fairfield Inn & Suites 

• Hyatt San Jose Airport 

• Wyndham Hotel 

Shuttle buses will run at approximately 30 minute intervals (15 minute 
intervals during peak hours), Monday through Friday. 

Getting Around 

Taxis 

Yellow Checker Cab Company 
408-293-1234 

Public Transportation 

Most VTA Bus routes operate every 15-30 minutes weekdays. For more 
information, please call 408-321-2300. 

The city of San Jose offers Light Rail service to many popular locations. 
For more information, please call 408-321-2300. 



4t 



Other Services 

Book Store 

Breakpoint Books is the official CDC book vendor, 
located on the Exhibit Level. A broad selection of 
books from the speakers and supporting material 
highlight a vast array of available titles. Take a break 
from your sessions and browse the 
unique offerings. 



Conference-At-A-Glance 

Exhibit Level 

Convention Center 

To keep track of everything that's going on, be sure to check the 

Conference-At-A-Glance Schedule, located on the Exhibit Level of the 

Convention Center. This schedule will contain the most current 

information available. 

Coffee Breaks 

Coffee & other refreshments are available during regular breaks in the 
morning and afternoons for paid conference attendees. 






Lost & Found 

Exhibit Level, Almaden Lobby 

Convention Center 

Please check the Show Office in the VIP Lounge during conference & 

exhibit hours for lost and found information. After the show, all 

unclaimed items will be given to the main Convention Center office. 



Conference Sessions Audio CD-ROM 

Stop by the official CDC Audio CD-ROM Desk to order audio recordings 
from your favorite sessions or those special sessions you were unable to 
attend. Special discounts are available for multiple orders. The Audio 
CD-ROM Desk will be staffed during open conference hours, and will be 
located near the bookstore on the concourse level of the convention 
center. 

DVDs 

Don't miss out on the new "Best of GDC" DVD series -"Best of GDC" 
DVD (includes 2001-2003) "Best of GDC 2004". The DVDs contain 
numerous full length lectures from previous speakers such as Shiguri 
Miyamoto, Will Wright and Peter Molyneux. Available for pre-order by 
the conference bookstore on the concourse. 

Proceedings 

Abstracts, outlines, notes, code, resources and valuable information from 
many of our conference sessions are available for purchase on CD-ROM 
Proceedings, to pick up your copy at a special onsite price. Copies are 
limited. 

Minors 

Due to safety concerns, no one under the age of 18 (including infants in 
strollers) will be permitted on the show floor at any time during the 
Game Developers Conference. 

A Message About Your Badge 

Your badge is valuable. A fee will apply, equal to the original purchase 
price of your GDC pass, should a duplicate badge be requested for lost, 
misplaced or stolen badges. 

T-Shirts 

GDC 2004 T-shirts will be distributed at no charge at the Game 
Developers Choice Awards. T-shirts will be available for purchase in the 
Bookstore on Thursday and Friday. 



First Aid 

Exhibit Level, Hall 2 
Convention Center 
First Aid is located in the back of Hall 2 of the Convention Center. 



Lobby Bar 

Exhibit Level 
Convention Center 



Sponsored by. 




GameDevelopers 

Conference 



Vice President 

Philip Chapnick 

Director 

AlanYu 

Program Manager 

Susan Marshall 

Advisory Board 

Ha! Barwood 

Louis Castle, Electronic Arts 

Mark Cerny, Cerny Games 

Doug Church, Eidos Interactive 

Mark DeLoura, Sony Computer Entertainment 
America 

Alex Dunne, Camasutra.com 

Julian Eggebrecht, Factor 5 

Chris Hecker, Definition Six 

Elaine Hodgson, Incredible Technologies 

Rob Huebner, Nihilistic Software 

Cyrus Lum, Inevitable Entertainment 

Masaya Matsuura, NanaOn-sha 

Julien Merceron, Ubi Soft Entertainment 

Tetsuya Mizuguchi 

David Perry, Shiny Entertainment 

Jason Rubin, Naughty Dog 

Jez San, Argonaut Software 

Alan Yu, Game Developers Conference 

Audio Advisory Board 

Buzz Burrowes, Sony Computer Entertainment 
America 

Brian Schmidt, Microsoft Xbox 

Tommy Tallarico, Tallarico Studios 

Visual Arts Advisory Board 

Cyrus Lum, Inevitable Entertainment 
Steve Reid, Red Storm Entertainment 
Paul Steed, Microsoft Xbox 
Steve Theodore, Rad Game Tools 
Rob Titus, Naughty Dog 

Sales 

Michele Sweeney, Group Associate Publisher 

Susan Kirby, Account Manager, Northern 
California & Midwestern US 

Aaron Murawski, Account Manager, 
Recruitment & Education 

Craig Perreault, Account Manager, Western US 
&Asia 



Afton Thatcher, Senior Account Manager, 
Northeastern US & Europe 

Marketing 

Michele Maguire, Director, Business 
Development & Marketing 

Jennifer McLean, Senior Marketing and Public 
Relations Manager 

Mary Dickinson, Marketing Coordinator 

Scott Lyon, Marketing Coordinator 

Audrey Welch, Art Director 

www.gdconf.com 

Alex Dunne, Online Producer 
Luke Lin, Webmaster 

Event Program 

Kevin Chanel, Production Manager 
Linda Dunne, Art Director 

CMP Event Operations & Services 

Lori Silva, Executive Director 

Jennifer Jessup, Director 

Jill Anapolsky, Operations Manager 

Sunny Andersen, Operations Manager 

Leslie Fazio, Operations Manager 

Laurie Fellezs, Operations Manager 

Meggan Scavio, Operations Manager 

Rafael Robles, Associate Director of 
Registration 

JB Boatwright, Registration Coordinator 

James Meyer, Registration Coordinator 

Allan Rosenberg, Housing Coordinator 

IGDA 

Jason Delia Rocca, Managing Director 
Liz Wakefield, Operations Manager 
Rudy Geronimo, Membership Assistant 

Game Developers Choice Awards 

Dara Tynefield, Producer 

Administrative Assistant 

Kelly O'Brien 

Public Relations 

The Bohle Company 

T-Shirt Design 

Stephen Anri Marshall 



CMP Game Group 



-6- 



WWW 



gdconl 



f.com 




EVENTS & MEETINGS 



MONDAY, MARCH 22 & TUESDAY, MARCH 23 

Developer Business Summit: An IGDA Think Tank 

Presented by: ^-^ • i 

Qjigda=, 

ioam-6pm • Ai, Convention Center 

Despite the overall growth and progress of the games industry, there are 
countless issues and barriers that must be dealt with in order for the 
business of games to truly succeed. While there is no question that 
studios are in this business to make great games, be competitive and 
prosper, there are meta-level business issues that effect us day-to-day 
that we need to come together as a community and deal with - or at 
least explore - on the whole. This "Think-Tank" provides a rare 
opportunity for studio heads, publishing executives and other industry 
leaders to come together in a neutral forum, roll up their sleeves and 
work out solutions to some of the biggest issues facing game 
development studios today. See page 31 for full description. 

Tutorials 

Monday, March 22 & Tuesday, March 23 • See pages 31-36 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1U 

The GDC Reel 

2pm • Came Theater 

The GDC Reel consists of clips of the Game Developers Choice Awards 
nominated games. Pull up a bean bag, have some popcorn and check it out. 
Located at the far west end of the exhibit level concourse, near Room J. 

4th Annual Game Developers Choice Awards 

Presented by. 

Qigda^ 



Sponsored by-. 



<l AVIDIA. B 



6:30-g:3opm • Civic Auditorium 

Honor the developers who transcended the state of the art in 2003. 
Started in 2000 with the idea that there is no greater honor than to be 
recognized by one's peers, the Game Developers Choice Awards are game 
development's most prized honors. The ceremony is open to all GDC 
attendees and will be immediately followed by cocktails, hors d'oeuvres, 
and music compliments of NVIDIA. The Independent Games Festival 
awards ceremony precedes the Game Developers Choice Awards. 

Supercollider 

Wednesday, March 24 & Thursday, March 25 
at the IGDA booth, Concourse 

In the tradition of Leviathan and Alphabet City, gameLab presents another 
experimental MMOLG (massively multiplayer off-line game) created 
specially for the GDC. Super Collider combines a collectible card game with 
a giant-sized boardgame and is designed to be played by thousands of 
players over the course of two days. Like the chaotic world of particle 
physics, Super Collider is ordered but unstable. Even the most casual player 
can have a dramatic impact on the outcome of the game - every move 
could be the winning move! Prizes will be given out to the top players on 
each team. Super Collider runs Thursday and Friday at the IGDA booth on 
the Expo level concourse. 



Independent Games Festival Awards Ceremony 

Platinum Sponsors: 

A AOL 

for BROADBAND 



pniuE/rpi/Kt 



c>-m'e;s:po t 



Where gamers go to kno' 



Gold Sponsors "Open" Category: 

directx |@j intel 

Download the finalist games at dlx.gamespot.com 

6:30pm • Civic Auditorium 

The Independent Games Festival was established in 1998 to encourage 
innovation in game development and to recognize the best independent 
game developers. The finalists' games are on display at the IGF Pavilion 
on the GDC Expo floor. This year's winners will be announced at the 
Game Developers Choice Awards ceremony. 

THURSDAY, MARCH 25 

IGDA Annual Meeting 

i:i5-2:45pm • B2, Convention Center • GDC box lunch will be served 

The International Game Developers Association's board of directors and 
executive management will give developers a rundown of the association's 
progress over the past year, as well asan indication of what's in store for 
the comingyear. There will be a O&A period to get feedback and input from 
the community, and new board candidates will be presented. The 
International Game Developers Association is a non-profit membership 
organization that advocates globally on issues related to digital game 
creation. The IGDA's mission is to strengthen the international game 
development community and effect change to benefit that community. 

G.A.N.G.Town Hall Meeting 

1:302:30pm • Almaden, Hilton 

2003 was an amazing year for the Game Audio Network Guild (G.A.N.G.) and 
the entire audio community. The officers and board of directors will discuss 
the organizations accomplishments as well as what is currently in the works. 
They will take a look ahead to the future of the organization and discuss the 
launch of Phase III of their award winning website www.audiogang.org.This 
meeting is open to anyone interested in promoting excellence in interactive 
audio. G.A.N.G. and its 600+ members are already having a positive effect on 
the entire gaming community as well as students, non-professionals and the 
general public. Come by and find out why the organization is helping to 
change game audio for everyone. Question and answer period will follow. 

Experimental Gameplay Workshop 
Jonathan Blow 

3-6pm • J2, Convention Center 

Traditional art forms like music, film, and literature have established 
mechanisms for encouraging experimental works, and for bringing these 
new ideas into the mainstream creative process. These mechanisms prevent 
an art form from iterating endlessly on proven successes and ultimately 
stagnating creatively. The Experimental Gameplay Workshop aims to: 
provide a platform for game designers to showcase risky new work and 
discuss it with their peers, legitimize gameplay research, and development 
and create a community of experimental game designers. The Experimental 
Gameplay Workshop is a gathering of game developers interested in new 
and risky game designs. It consists of several presentations by experimental 
game authors, followed by peer discussion. Presentations are formal 20- 
minute sessions where an experimenter demonstrates a game and gives a 
short lecture about the game's experimental aspects. Each presentation will 
focus on the new gameplay, tradeoffs and decisions made, difficulties 
overcome, and problems remaining in the design. A short discussion session 
and O&A follow each presentation. 



NEW LOOK * NEW COLUMNS * NEW INSIGHTS 




APPLY FOR A 

FREE SUBSCRIPTION 

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ards Conference t-shirts will be distributed at the Game Developers Choice Awards Conference t-shirts wil 



GDC>04 
T-SHIRTS 




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irds Conference t-shirts will be distributed at the Game Developers Choice Awards Conference t-shirts will 



)r purchase in the bookstore After the ceremony, they will be available for purchase in the bookstore Afte 




-9- 



EVENTS & MEETINGS 



Booth Crawl 

Sponsored by: 



inlel 



5:i5-6:3opm • GDC Show Floor 

Explore the Expo floor with a refreshment in 
your hand, seeking out information on the 
latest innovations presented at the GDC Expo. 
Talk with company experts in a more relaxed 
atmosphere, and get your questions answered 
as you snack on happy hour goodies and enjoy 
catching up with technology - and friends. 

GameHotel 

6-8pm • Civic Auditorium 
See page 24 for description. 

SF Bay Maya Users Group 

7pm • B1, Convention Center 

Come join us again for the 4th Annual Maya 
Users group meeting at the GDC. Max Sims 
(co-author Inside Maya 5) will MC the latest 
product demonstrations, a speech from senior 
Alias management and two Maya user game 
companies sharing their use of Maya. Food 
and beverages will be served. Please go to 
www.alias.com/events to register. 

2003 G.A.N.G. Awards Show 

8:30pm • Regency Ballroom, Fairmont 

The widely popular non-profit organization 
G.A.N.G. (Game Audio Network Guild, 
www.audiogang.org) will be having its 2nd 
annual awards show in the Regency Ballroom 
at the Fairmont Hotel on Thursday, March 25th 
starting at 8:30 PM. The show will involve the 
presentation of over 30 interactive audio 
related awards as well as live on-stage video 
game performances and secret celebrity special 
guests. Like last year, you may laugh you may 
cry but one thing is for certain. ..you will have a 
great time. Please join us all once again as we 
applaud the best game audio of 2003. 

THURSDAY, MARCH 25 & FRIDAY, MARCH 26 

GDC Mobile 

Sponsored by: MOKIA Ht 



gam-6pm • Regency Ballroom, Fairmont 

Explosive growth of mobile users, short 
production cycles, and the variety of distri- 
bution channels means the mobile game sector 
offers major opportunity for both profit and 
innovation to all game developers. Further, the 
mobile market needs the creative input from 
game developers to maintain its momentum. 
However, as devices become more sophis- 
ticated, costs and risks increase. Only at GDC 



Mobile do leaders from the mobile communi- 
cations industry meet with the world's best 
game developers. Network operators, content 
aggregators, technology and infrastructure 
providers and leading game developers 
together develop effective content strategies to 
engage billions of consumers worldwide. 

FRIDAY, MARCH 26 

IA-SIG Town Hall Meeting 

i:30-2:30pm • Salon III, Marriott 

Come to the annual town-hall meeting of the 
Interactive Audio Special interest Group (ia-sig). 
Open for anyone interested in interactive on all 
platforms, the ia-sig is dedicated to helping 
forward the industry and creating standards 
such as DLS, DLS2 and I3DL2. In addition to 
receiving updates on the latest initiatives such 
as IXMF and AAG, we will discuss what future 
issues the ia-sig can tackle. 

ONGOING EVENTS 

Fairmont Hotel Bar 

Fairmont Hotel Lobby 

When the conference is done for the day and a 
party is not in the offing, meet friends and 
colleagues, and network with potential 
business partners in a sophisticated setting. 

Game Developers Choice Awards Pavilion 
Presented by: f)\ jffdS :=rriL.. 

Sponsored by: 

<£ AVIDIA. II 

Expo Hours • Booth 1235 

Stop by the Game Developers Choice Awards 
Pavilion to check out the nominated games. 

Game Theater 

Wednesday, March 24 - Friday, March 26 
See onsite schedule for details. 

Screening: 

• The GDC Reel (clips of the Game Developers 
Choice Awards nominated games) 

• A selection of the lectures, panels and 
keynotes from GDC 2004. 

Pull up a bean bag, have some popcorn, and 
check it out. Located at the far west end of the 
exhibit level concourse, near Room J. 

Game Room 

Tuesday, March 23 - Thursday, March 25 
7pm-i2am • Plaza Room, Hilton 



When you're ready to de-amp, here's a more 
relaxing setup: a room full of board games 
and your developer compadres. A game of 
"Settlers of Catan", anyone? 

Got Art? 

Sponsored by: <$. 7? VI D I A. 

Expo Hours • Booth 552 

Got Art? Get Quadro! NVIDIA invites all artists 
attending GDC to participate in our third annual 
"Got Art?"drawing contest. This drawing contest 
will run all three days of the exhibition. Artists 
will compete 10 at a time in 20-minute heats, 
using NVIDIA-provided traditional art materials 
such as charcoal, pastels, crayons and paper. 
NVIDIA will start a new contest every half hour. 
The winner of each new contest will win an 
NVIDIA Quadro professional graphics card and 
every entrant will be given a t-shirt for partici- 
pating. Each day's contestants will also be 
entered into a nightly, random drawing for 
thousands of dollars in software from the 
biggest names in digital content creation. 

Interactive WiFi Lounge 

Sponsored by: 



inlel 



Expo Hours • Booth 1502 

When it's time to rest your weary feet, 
exhausted from walking the expansive show 
floor, stop by the Interactive Lounge. Check 
your email, surf the web, or just sit back and 
relax in a comfortable setting. 

Independent Games Festival Pavilion 

Expo Hours • Booth 1514 

The Independent Games Festival was 
established in 1998 to encourage innovation in 
game development and to recognize the best 
independent game developers. The finalists' 
games are on display at the IGF Pavilion on the 
GDC Expo Floor. This year's winners will be 
announced at the Independent Games Festival 
awards ceremony. Download the finalists' 
games at dlx.gamespot.com. 

Platinum Sponsors: 

A AOL 

for BROADBAND 

Cold Sponsors "Open" Category: 

directx |gj inlel 

Download the finalist games at 
dlx.gamespot.com (&£&&&. 



Where gamers go 



■10- 



www.gdconf.com 




KEYNOTES 




AUDIO 

Sound Design Methodology of 
Medial of Honor 

Erik Kraber 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-ii:3oam 

Almaden, Hilton 

See page 41 



GAME DESIGN 

Entertainment Experience First, Videogame 

Second: The Making 

of The Return of the King 

Neil Young 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:303:30pm 

A3, Convention Center 

See page S9 





BUSINESS & LEGAL 
Prepping for the Transition: 
Will You Be Ready? 

John Schappert 

Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 
B2, Convention Center 
See page 4g 



PRODUCTION 

Production Through Collaboration: 
Escalating Demands on the Producer 

David Perry 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:306:30pm 

A3, Convention Center 

See page 81 





JAIIard 

Corporate Vice President, 

Xbox Platform 

Microsoft 



Robbie Bach 

Senior Vice President, 

Home and Entertainment Division 

Chief Xbox Officer, Microsoft 



GENERAL INTEREST 

Getting to the Game 

Wednesday, March 24 • io:30-ii:3oam 
Civic Auditorium 

For years, you've ignited the imaginations of 
gamers, creating epic worlds, unforgettable 
characters and transporting us into your stories. 
Your visions are the future of videogames, but 
those visions are often held prisoner to limiting 
technologies, timelines, techniques, tradeoffs 
and price tags. 

Came players' skyrocketing expectations, 
though, will not be abated. 

You're demanding ways to make better games, 
faster. Better ways to break new ground, faster. 
Better ways to design around fun, not around 
discontinuous technologies. 

Is there a faster path to Game of the Year 
accolades and to the hearts of the mass market? 

How can you spend less time plumbing and 
more time playing with your game designs? 
What roles do new software tools, services, and 
support play in your future? 

We'll talk about how we can help you finally 
attain your mind-blowing visions. We'll talk 
about reaching another level of mass-market 
greatness. 




J Allard: As one of The Hollywood Reporter's "Top 35 
Under 35," J Allard was recognized in 2003 as being 
one of the most promising young executives to lead 
the entertainment industry. 

As corporate vice president of the Xbox Platform, 
Allard drives digital entertainment initiatives by 
overseeing operating systems, hardware and online 
strategies and ensuring that Xbox Live continues to 
be the world's largest and most innovative, all- 
broadband gaming service. 

In 1993, Allard, with his memo to top executives, 
"Windows: The Killer Application for the Internet," 
led the charge to get Microsoft involved online. But 
Allard's real claim-to-fame was his ability to 
expand the company's commitment to the 
promise of digital entertainment. His role in the 
creation of the Xbox led Business 2.0 to call Allard 
a "Baby Bill," one of a handful of young Microsoft 
executives driving the company into the future. 

Before joining Xbox, Allard and his team developed 
an FTP and Web server for the Windows NT® 
operating system and started the company's Web 
server initiative- Internet Information Server, which 
has become one of the most widespread 
commercial Internet server products available for 
businesses on the Internet. 

Joining the company out of college in 1991, Allard 
began his career by laying out the company's 
TCP/IP networking strategy and defining the 
Windows Sockets API, the key API for Internet 
computing. Allard has participated in the Internet 

Engineering Task Force, served on the Internet 
Architecture Board and consulted on future Internet 
protocols, to be deployed in Internet. 

Allard has a bachelor's degree in computer science 
from Boston University. 



Robert J. Bach: As senior vice president of the Home 
and Entertainment division at Microsoft Corp. and 
chief Xbox officer (CXO), Robbie Bach directs a global 
division that is committed to delivering consumer 
hardware and software products and the most 
realistic, intense and action-packed game 
experiences to gamers around the world. 

As CXO, Bach manages the entire Microsoft Xbox 
video game system effort, including the teams that 
oversee hardware, third-party game development, 
games published under the Microsoft Game 
Studios label, Xbox operations, marketing, research, 
sales and support. He also manages the large group 
of engineers making Xbox Live, the world's largest 
all-broadband gaming service. 

Under Bach's leadership, Xbox has been enthusias- 
tically embraced by the games industry and 
gamers alike. The world's top game companies 
have committed to Xbox, including more than 200 
worldwide third-party publishers and developers. 

In his 14 years at Microsoft, Bach has been 
responsible for everything from small business 
marketing and OEM programs, to major product 
launches and marketing for Microsoft's family of 
productivity applications, including Microsoft 
Office, Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, Outlook, 
Publisher, the FrontPage and Works., Before joining 
the HED team in 1998, Bach was vice president of 
the Learning, Entertainment and Productivity 
Division at Microsoft, which developed and 
marketed home productivity, education, reference 
and games software. 

Before coming to Microsoft, Bach was a financial 
analyst at Morgan Stanley & Co. He holds a 
bachelor's degree in economics from the University 
of North Carolina, where his love of basketball was 
nurtured by fellow UNC student, Michael Jordan. 
Bach received a master's degree in business 
administration from Stanford University. 




KEYNOTES 





PROGRAMMING 

A Candid Look at the Issues and Rewards 
of Bleeding Edge Engine Development 

John Carmack 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

Civic Auditorium 

See page gi 



VISUAL ARTS 

From Visual Anti-Establishmentarianism 

To Ubiquity & Back 

John Caeta 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

Jl, Convention Center 

See page wg 



■11- 





VISUAL ARTS 
Workflow Convergence: How Motion 
Picture Pipelines Are Merging With 
Game Development 

John DesJardin 
Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 
Salon IV, Marriott 
See page no 



VISUAL ARTS 

The History of Animation 
Phil Tippett 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 

Salon IV, Marriott 

See page no 








GENERAL INTEREST 
Encouraging Innovation in Game Development 

Andy House 

Thursday, March 25 • io:30-ii:3oam 

Civic Auditorium 



What is innovation? 



Why do we seek new experiences, the latest 
software, the newest gadgets? Why should 
game playing be any different? Should game 
developers care about innovation? 

As game development costs rise, taking a risk 
with the design of your game becomes an 
increasingly difficult decision to make. By 
reproducing the gameplay of a previously- 
successful title, common wisdom goes, you 
can maximize the chances that your title will 
also be a success. But new and exciting 
experiences are what keep game players 
interested; creating something unique is 
absolutely fundamental if you are to truly 
maximize your possibility for success. 

However, this is a delicate balance - certainly 
we all know of games which have gone too far 
"out there", which were unique and interesting 
experiences, but failures in the marketplace. 

One of the key factors to the success of 
PlayStation has been a clear focus on the 
experience of the player. Providing new and 
innovative experiences for the player to enjoy 
is fundamental to the success of the platform. 
Further, innovation in the platform hardware 
can encourage broader acceptance in the 
marketplace; innovation via unique 
peripherals can encourage developers to 



create unique games; and innovation through 
first-party software can attract new game 
players and forge new gameplay styles for 
other titles to explore further. 

In this keynote we'll explore PlayStation 
innovation - past, present, and future - 
and how you can take advantage of this 
innovation in your own titles to create 
experiences which are unique, enjoyable, 
and profitable. 

Andy House: As executive vice president, Sony 
Computer Entertainment America, Andrew House 
is responsible for third party and developer 
relations, including cultivating relationships and 
maintaining and growing content alliances with 
developers and publishers, as well as managing 
licensee relations and overall strategic product 
planning. Additionally, Andrew oversees all facets 
of the company's marketing and brand 
management efforts in North America. Andrew's 
extraordinary ability to create mutually beneficial 
partnerships with the third party community has 
led many of the industry's key creative houses to 
publicly tout unwavering commitment to 
PlayStation, helping Sony Computer 
Entertainment America maintain its leadership 
position in two platform cycles. Andy is also 
responsible for ensuring that the best offline and 
online titles appear on PlayStation 2, and played 
an instrumental role in encouraging platform- 
exclusive content development for many of the 
industry's premier franchises. During his tenure, 



Andrew has been instrumental in the creation and 
execution of the marketing strategy that 
transformed and expanded the PlayStation brand 
into a household name, appealing to a mass- 
market audience. Andrew has also been a key 
player in developing award-winning advertising 
campaigns forthe company, including the 2002 
PlayStation 2 brand campaign, featuring the 
tagline "Live in Your World. Play in Ours.," that 
received accolades from Advertising Age, Ad Week, 
and Ad Critic. Andrew was appointed to the 
position of executive vice president in July 2002 
and previously held the position of senior vice 
president, Sony Computer Entertainment America. 
He was appointed to serve as a corporate 
executive officer of Sony Computer Entertainment 
Inc., the global company, and he is a key member 
of the organization's management team. Andrew 
joined Sony in 1990, where he worked in corporate 
public relations for Sony Corporation (Japan) for 
five years. In April 1995, Andrew was transferred to 
the marketing and communications division of 
Sony Computer Entertainment Inc., the parent 
company for Sony Computer Entertainment 
America and Sony Computer Entertainment 
Europe, working with the newly created 
International Software Division. There, he was 
responsible for the marketing and promotion of 
Sony Computer Entertainment's European and 
U.S. developed game titles for the Japanese 
market before leading the marketing effort for 
Sony Computer Entertainment America beginning 
in March 1996. Andrew obtained his bachelor of 
arts in English language and literature from 
Oxford University, England. 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of GDC 2004. 



-12- 



www.gdconf.com 



ADVISORY BOARD BIOS & RECOMMENDATIONS 




Hal Barwood 

Hal Barwood was a project leader at LucasArts 
Entertainment for more than 10 years, designing, writing 
and directing a number of story-game titles, including 
Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis, a PC adventure 
game, Big Sky Trooper, a Super Nintendo RPG, Indiana 
Jones and the Infernal Machine^ real-time 3D action- 
adventure, and RTX Red Rock, a character-action title for PS2. Before Hal 
began building games, he spent twenty years in Hollywood as a writer 
on Sugarland Express, writer-producer on Dragonslayer, and writer- 
director on Warning Sign. 

Hal Barwood recommends these sessions: 

Acting for Animators 
Ed Hooks 

Visual Arts • See page in 

From Script to Joystick, World-Building 101 
E. Dan Arey & Bob Rafei 

Game Design • See page 63 

Open Spaces and How to Find Them in New Game Ideas 
Peter Molyneux 

Game Design • See page 6j 

Practical Implementation of High Dynamic Range Lighting 
Masaki Kawase 

Programming • See page 103 

State of the Art: Anatomy of 3D Level Design 
Neil Alphonso, Ed Byrne, Heather Kelley, Matt Wood 

Game Design • See page 6g 

Louis Castle 

Electronic Arts 

Louis Castle is a co-founder of Westwood Studios and 
one of the senior studio leaders at EALA. As part of the 
management team, Louis directs EALA's programming, 
artwork, audio, and research & development departments, as 
well as business strategy. EALA creates product for some of the most 
successful and best-known intellectual properties within Electronic Arts' 
formidable portfolio including the original product lines of Medal of 
Honor and Command & Conquer and licensed properties Lord of the 
Rings and James Bond. Louis was the general manager of Westwood 
Studios from 2000-2003 anci served in creative, business and finance 
roles while growing Westwood from two employees in 1985 to over 250 
in 2002 (including the Irvine office). In his creative roles, Louis has 
contributed as executive producer, creative director, technical director, 
programmer and artist to over 100 games created by Westwood over the 
past 18 years. His business positions include serving as the COO and 
finance officer for Westwood Studios between 1992 and 2000, a period 
in which the company negotiated 4 multinational acquisitions. Louis is 
passionate about the products and the people who create them. His role 
as vice president at EALA allows him to leverage his considerable 
interactive entertainment experience to add value across the spectrum 
of EALA's creative and business development. 

Louis Castle recommends these sessions: 

A Candid Look at the Issues and Rewards of Bleeding Edge Engine 

Development 

John Carmack 

Programming Keynote • See page gi 





Entertainment Experience First, Videogame Second: 
Making of The Return of the King 
Neil Young 

Game Design Keynote • See page $g 

Experimental Gameplay Workshop 
Jon Blow 

Game Design ■ See page 63 

Real-Time Global Illumination 
Eskil Steenberg 

Programming • See page 10s 

Triangulation: A Schizophrenic Approach to Game Design 
Will Wright 

Game Design • See page jo 

Mark Cerny 

Cerny Games 

Mark Cerny has been working in game design and 
technology for 20 years, ranging from 1982s Marble 
Madness, which he designed and programmed for Atari 
coin-op, to 2001's Jak & Daxter. After his stint at Atari and several 
years with Sega in Japan, Mark founded and managed the Sega Technical 
Institute in the US, where he also worked on Sonic 2 and Kid Chameleon. 
Mark then went to Crystal Dynamics as its first technical employee, then 
to Universal Interactive Studios, where as president he oversaw the 
creation of the Crash Bandicoot and Spyrothe Dragon series. In 1999 Mark 
established Cerny Games Inc. as a game design consultancy. Cerny Games 
has now had a major role in four released games and is presently involved 
a number of upcoming character-action projects. 

Mark Cerny recommends these sessions: 

Adventures in Character Design 
Tim Schafer 

Game Design • See page 60 

(359) Do-it-Yourself Usability: A Crash Course on User-Testing 
Tom Lorusso & Marcos Nunes-Ueno 

Game Design • See page 34 

A Peek Behind the Shoji: Japan's Videogame Market Today 
Ryoichi Hasegawa 

Game Design • See page 6j 

Production Through Collaboration: Escalating Demands on the 

Producer 

David Perry 

Production Keynote • See page 81 

(342) Test Automation in Game Development 

John Bartkiw, Jennifer Boespflug, Jonathan Burns, David Eichorn, 

Sean P. Jenkin 

Game Design • See page 35 



Doug Church 

Eidos Interactive 



yfi 

I Doug Church has been in the game industry since 1990, 
^45 C^^P working on a variety of PC titles (Ultima Underworld, 
^^ System Shock, Thief a bit of Flight Unlimited thrown in) at 
what became LookingGlass Studios. He left LookingGlass in late 
1999 and since then has consulted on a variety of titles, including a tiny 
bit on Ion's Deus Ex, and recently worked on Harmonix's Frequency for the 



-13- 




ADVISORY BOARD BIOS & RECOMMENDATIONS 



PS2. Officially a programmer, he actually ends 
up doing mostly game design and some 
project management, with varied impact. He 
has been coming to GDC for 10 years and still 
finds it a pleasing blend of frustration and 
exhilaration. 

Doug Church recommends these sessions: 

Beyond Fun: Setting Aesthetic Goals and 

Sticking to Them 

Craig Derrick & Tim Stellmach 

Came Design • See page 61 

The Collection and Applications of Metrics 
in an MMP Game: Lessons 
Learned from The Sims Online 
Larry Mellon 

Programming • See page 95 

The Evolution of a Franchise: Legend of 

Zelda 

Eiji Aunoma 

Game Design • See page 63 

Game Design Methods of ICO 
Kenji Kaido & Fumito Ueda 

Game Design • See page 64 

The Interesting Thing About Bishops: 
Simulation Boundaries in Splinter Cell 
Clint Hocking 

Game Design • See page 65 

Triangulation: A Schizophrenic Approach 
to Game Design 
Will Wright 

Game Design • See page jo 

Using Verlet Integration and Constraints 
in a Six Degree of Freedom Rigid Body 
Physics Simulation 
Rick Baltman & Ron Radeztsky Jr 

Programming • See page 108 

Mark DeLoura 

Sony Computer Entertainment 
America 

Mark DeLoura is currently the 
manager of developer 
relations at Sony Computer 
Entertainment America. He has also been 
editor-in-chief of Game Developer magazine, 
the lead software engineer in the developer 
support group at Nintendo of America, an 
arcade game programmer, and a game 
industry consultant. In his spare time, Mark 
created the Came Programming Gems series 
of books, compilations of programming 
nuggets from professional game developers. 
The third book in the series is currently under 
construction. 

Mark DeLoura recommends these sessions: 





Advanced Real-Time Reflectance 

Daniel Baker, Naty Hoffman, Peter-Pike Sloan 

Programming • See page 92 

Building Value in Your Company: One Small 
Studio's Approach 
Jeremy Gordon 

Business & Legal • See page so 

Experimental Gameplay Workshop 
Jon Blow 

Game Design • See page 63 

The Making of the Official Counter-Strike 

Bot 

Michael Booth 

Programming • See page 101 

Programming the PlayStation Portable (PSP) 
David Coombes & Peter Young 

Programming • See page 104 

Alex Dunne 

Gamasutra.com 

Alex Dunne is the executive 
producer of Gamasutra.com, as 
well as the chairman of the 
Independent Games Festival, which 
is held annually at the Game Developers 
Conference. He is the former editorial director 
for Game Developer magazine and 
Gamasutra.com, and co-authored the book 
The Game Developer's Marketplace, published 
by Coriolis. 

Alex Dunne recommends these sessions: 

Experimental Gameplay Workshop 
Jon Blow 

Game Design • See page 63 

Game Design Methods of ICO 
Kenji Kaido & Fumito Ueda 

Game Design • See page 64 

The Philosophical Roots of Computer Game 

Design 

Ernest W.Adams 

Game Design • See page 6j 

Quality of Life: The Next Step 
Francois Dominic Laramee 

IGDA • See page jg 

Secrets of Successful Indie Developers 
Steve Pavlina 

Business & Legal • See page 56 

Julian Eggebrecht 

Factor 5 

Julian Eggebrecht is co- 
founder of Factor 5, a game 
and technology developer 
located in Marin County, California. 
Factor 5 was founded in Germany in 1989 and 




moved to the U.S. in 1996. Factor 5 is a 
technology partner for Nintendo's Gamecube 
console and provider of the MusyX sound 
tools. Julian's work includes the Turrican line 
of games, Star Wars: Rogue Squadron 
(LucasArts), Ballblazer Champions (LucasArts), 
Indiana Jones - Greatest Adventures (LucasArts), 
International Superstar Soccer Deluxe (Konami), 
Contra: The Alien Wars (Konami). Most recently 
he was director of Star Wars: Rogue Squadron II: 
Rogue Leader for the Nintendo Gamecube. 
Julian is Factor 5's president and lead director/ 
producer, currently working on two titles. 

Julian Eggebrecht recommends these 
sessions: 

Game Design Challenge: The Love Story 
Raph Koster, Warren Spector, Will Wright, Eric 
Zimmerman 

Game Design • See page 64 

Game Design Methods of ICO 
Kenji Kaido & Fumito Ueda 

Game Design • See page 64 

The Evolution of a Franchise: The Legend of 

Zelda 

Eiji Aunoma 

Game Design • See page 63 

Managing the Hydra: Successfully Running 
Multiple Projects in a Videogame Studio 
Ray Muzyka & Greg Zeschuk 

Production • See page 85 

What Got Left out of Battlefield 1942 
Johan Perrson 

Game Design • See page yi 

Chris Hecker 

definition six 

Chris Hecker is technical 
director of definition six, a 
small game development 
company working on high-end 
physics and graphics technologies. Chris has 
been on the advisory board for the Game 
Developers Conference for many years and is a 
regular speaker at the GDC, Siggraph, and 
other conferences. A frequent contributor to 
Game Developer magazine, Chris was the 
technical columnist for the magazine for two 
years. He is also on the editorial board of the 
computer graphics research publication The 
Journal of Graphics Tools. 

Chris Hecker recommends these sessions: 

Beyond Fun: Setting Aesthetic Goals and 

Sticking to Them 

Craig Derrick & Tim Stellmach 

Game Design • See page 6i 




See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of GDC 2004. 



-u- 



www.gdconf.com 



ADVISORY BOARD BIOS & RECOMMENDATIONS 




Experimental Cameplay Workshop 
Jon Blow 

Game Design • See page 63 

Game Design Challenge: The Love Story 

Raph Koster, Warren Spector, Will Wright, Eric Zimmerman 

Game Design • See page 64 

Practical Implementation of High Dynamic Range Rendering 
Masaki Kawase 

Programming • See page 103 

Taking Game Physics Beyond Eye Candy 
David Wu 

Programming • See page ioj 

Triangulation: A Schizophrenic Approach to Game Design 
Will Wright 

Game Design • See page 70 

Elaine Hodgson 

Incredible Technologies 

Elaine A. Hodgson, president and CEO of Incredible 
Technologies, a $50 million Rolling Meadows, III., 
company and the country's largest privately held game 
manufacturer in the coin-operated amusement industry, has 
been bringing Internet technology successfully to main-street bars and 
taverns since 1996. In 1985 Hodgson combined her love of games and 
proficiency in programming when she founded Incredible Technologies 
with partner Richard Ditton. After 10 years of moderate success, they 
struck gold with the release of Golden Tee 3-D Golf in 1996. 

Elaine Hodgson recommends these sessions: 

The Civilization Series: How to Maintain a Successful Franchise 
Soren Johnson 

Game Design • See page 6i 

Game Design Challenge: The Love Story 

Raph Koster, Warren Spector, Will Wright, Eric Zimmerman 

Game Design • See page 64 

The Negotiation 

Tom Buscaglia, Barry Friedman, Lee Jacobson 

Business & Legal • See page 54 

Production through Collaboration: Escalating Demands 
on the Producer 
Dave Perry 

Production Keynote • See page 8i 

The Secret of Pac-Man's Success: Making Fun First 
Toru Iwatani 

Game Design • See page 68 

Rob Huebner 

Nihilistic Software 

Robert Huebner is a co-founder of Nihilistic Software, a 
small development team located in Marin County, 
California. Robert's previous work includes Jedi Knight: 
Dark Forces 2 from LucasArts, Descent from Parallax Software, 
and contributions to Starcraft by Blizzard Entertainment. Nihilistic's first 
title, Vampire: the Masquerade-Redemption, was a top-10 seller when 
released in March 2000. Robert is Nihilistic's director of technology, 
creating new engines and tools for Nihilistic's next project being 
developed for next-generation console systems. 





Rob Huebner recommends these sessions: 

A Candid Look at the Issues and Rewards of Bleeding Edge Engine 

Development 

John Carmack 

Programming • See page 91 

Advanced Real-Time Reflectance 

Daniel Baker, Naty Hoffman, Peter-Pike Sloan 

Programming • See page 92 

Al and Gameplay Design: Heaven or Hell 
Jonty Barnes & Peter Molynuex 

Programming • See page 93 

Fast Yet Realistic Deformation and Fracture 
James O'Brien 

Programming • See page 98 

The Full Spectrum Warrior Camera System 
John Giors 

Programming • See page 98 

Integrating Physics into a Modern Game Engine 
Brandon Moro 

Programming • See page 99 

Masaya Matsuura 

NanaOn-sha 

Masaya Matsuura graduated from Ritsumeikan 
University with a major in Industrial Sociology. An 
encounter with a Apple II Computer software 
"Kaleidoscope" at age nineteen changed his life dramatically. 
The images were mesmerizing, but he felt something was missing. He 
added music to it, his very first experience as a producer of computer 
entertainment. In April 1983 Masaya formed the band PYS'S (pronounced 
"Size") with female vocalist Chaka.The band pushed the frontiers of 
computer music, but the state of digital media at the time wasn't 
enough to satisfy Masaya 's creativity. After ten albums and several hit 
songs, PSY'S disbanded in August 1996. In 1993 Masaya explored new 
ground by combining music and multimedia with the release of The 
Seven Colors. It was the first CD-ROM from a Japanese musician and 
went on to win the Multimedia Grand Prix of 1993. The Seven Colors was 
followed byTOOL-X in 1994 and Tunin' Glue in 1996, both multimedia 
music titles that offered completely new ways to enjoy music. December 
1996 saw the release of Parappa the Rapper in Japan. It was like no other 
game that came before it, and it took Japan by storm. Parappa the 
Rapper went on to win the 1996 CECA Award, the Japan Software Award, 
and was named Japan Game of the Year 1997 by the readers of eighteen 
domestic game magazines. In 1999 Masaya crossed over from rap to 
hard rock with Um Jammer Lammy, and the game won an SCEI Gold disc 
after just two months. Masaya 's imagination doesn't end with music 
games. Vib-Ribbon, released in Japan and Europe in 1999, is another 
game revolution that creates gameplay from the player's own favorite 
music CD. Parappa the Rapper 2 was released in Japan in 2001 and is 
now available worldwide. In 2003, Masaya produced and composed 
sounds for the new Aibo,"ERS-7", which was very experimental and 
exciting work for him. Now in November 2003, Masaya releases 
mojibribbon for PS2 in Japan. This is a network title that has very 
unique style of blending rhythm and Japanese calligraphy using speech 
synthesis technology to convert text into rap sound. 

Masaya Matsuura recommends these sessions-. 



c 




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-17- 



ADVISORY BOARD BIOS & RECOMMENDATIONS 




Experimental Cameplay Workshop 
Jon Blow 

Came Design • See page 63 

Came Design: Risk and Return 
Masahiro Sakurai 

Came Design • See page 64 

Lemke's Algorithm, The Hammer In Your 
Math Toolbox? 
Chris Hecker 

Programming • See page wo 

Practical Implementation of High Dynamic 
Range Rendering 
Masaki Kawase 

Programming • See page 103 

Programming the PlayStation Portable (PSP) 
Dave Coombes & Peter Young 

Programming • See page 104 

Wants and Instincts 
Tetsuya Mizuguchi 

Game Design • See page 70 

Julien Merceron 

Ubi Soft Entertainment 

Julien Merceron started 
developing on the Atari Jaguar 
in 1993 at Shen in Paris, 
programming on Super Burnout, a 
motorbike racing game, and Nexus, a shoot- 
em-up. He joined Ubi Soft Entertainment in 
1994 and worked on programming for Rayman i 
for the Jaguar and PlayStation. He then 
programmed for POD for the M2 prototype of 
the 3DO and worked on the online features of 
POD PC, and was the lead programmer on 
Tonic Trouble for the Nintendo 64. He worked 
on programming for Rayman 2 for Nintendo 64 
and Dreamcast, and did R&D for Rayman 2 for 
PlayStation 2. Julien is now the worldwide 
technical director for Ubi Soft Entertainment. 

Julien Merceron recommends these sessions: 

Advanced Real-Time Reflectance 

Daniel Baker, Peter-Pike Sloan, Naty Hoffman 

Programming • See page g2 

A Candid Look at the Issues and Rewards of 
Bleeding Edge Engine Development 
John Carmack 

Programming Keynote • See page gi 

Practical Implementation of High Dynamic 
Range Rendering 
Masaki Kawase 

Programming • See page 103 

Real World Multi-Threading in PC Games 
Aaron Coday, William Damon, Maxim 
Perminov 

Programming • See page 104 




Triangulation: A Schizophrenic Approach 
to Game Design 
Will Wright 

Game Design • See page 70 

David Perry 

Shiny Entertainment 

David Perry is one of the best- 
known and tallest person- 
alities in the videogame 
business today. He started 
developing games 20 years ago in the United 
Kingdom, and in 1993 Perry formed Shiny 
Entertainment, based in Southern California. 
His company's first game, Earthworm Jim, 
became a Universal Cartoon Studios/Warner 
Kids Network television hit, a Playmates toy 
line, and still achieves new licenses today. To 
date, the games he has been involved in have 
sold around half a billion dollars at retail. 
Currently, he is heading up the team making 
the official game for the highly anticipated 
sequel to the cult hit movie The Matrix. In his 
spare time David helps others into the 
business through his web site, www.dperry.com. 

David Perry recommends these sessions: 

14 Ways of Drawing Players in with an 
Opening Cinematic 
David Freeman 

Came Design • See page 63 

(358) How to Write an Unforgettable Story 
John McLean-Foreman 

Game Design • See page 32 

Interfacing With Hollywood: Challenges 

andOpportunties 

Keith Boesky, Leonard Grossi, Charles 

Hirschorn, Jason Rubin, Larry Shapiro 

Business & Legal • See page S3 

Producing Orchestral Scores for Games 
Tommy Tallarico & Jack Wall 

Production • See page 86 

Jason Rubin 

Naughty Dog 

Jason Rubin co-founder of 
Naughty Dog, has developed 
games since 1985. Jason, 
partner Andy Gavin, and the 
Naughty Dog team are responsible for the 
creation and development of the first four 
Crash Bandicoot titles: Crash Bandicoot 
(1996 PSX), Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex 
Strikes Back (1997 PSX), Crash Bandicoot: 
Warped (1998 PSX), and CTR:Crash Team 
Racing (1999 PSX), as well as the first Jak and 
Daxter title: Jak and Daxter:The Precursor 
Legacy (2001 PS2). Together, these titles have 




sold more than 25 million units worldwide, 
with more than half of the sales coming from 
outside of the United States. Crash 3 is the 
only title created by a non-Japanese team to 
have sold more than a million units in Japan in 
the history of video games. Currently, Jason 
and the Naughty Dog team are working on 
the highly anticipated JakII. Jason and Andy 
sold Naughty Dog to Sony Computer 
Entertainment America in January of 2001. 

Jason Rubin recommends these sessions: 

A Peek Behind the Shoji: Japan's Videogame 
Market Today 
Ryoichi Hasegawa 

Game Design • See page 67 

Entertainment Experience First, Videogame 
Second: The Making of The Return 
of the King 
Neil Young 

Game Design • See page S9 

Follow The Money: Understanding Console 

Publishers 

Bill Swartz 

Business & Legal • See page 5; 

Minefields in Videogame Intellectual 
Property Protection 
Stephen Rubin 

Business & Legal • See page S3 

Would the Real Emergent Gameplay Please 

Stand Up? 

Harvey Smith & Randy Smith 

Game Design • See page 77 

Jez San 

Argonaut Software 

At 16, Jez founded Argonaut 
Software from his bedroom, 
writing books and games for 
home computers. Nearly twenty years 
on, Jez is CEO of recently public games 
developer, Argonaut Games Pic, and co-founded 
ARC International, the RISC microprocessor 
spin-off from Argonaut, whose first hardware 
technology was the ten million-selling "SuperFX 
chip" 3D RISC accelerator chip designed for 
Nintendo. Jez's first (successful) game was Star 
Glider in the mid 8o's, and Argonaut's more 
recent hits include Star Fox and Croc (each of 
which sold over three million copies). In the last 
6 months, Argonaut released Alien Resurrection 
for Fox, and Aladdin & Emperor's New Groove on 
PSi for Disney. Jez sits on the advisory boards of 
various Venture Capitalists, and is a committee 
member of BAFTA Interactive as well as the 
Came Developers Conference. 




See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



-18- 



www.gdconf.com 



■ ' 



ADVISORY BOARD BIOS & RECOMMENDATIONS 




Jez San recommends these sessions: 

Jak's Makeover for JakII: Why the Dramatic New Look for a Sequel? 
Bob Rafei 

Visual Arts • See page 773 

Light Scattering: Oh, that Looks Cool! Can we Have it in the Came, 
Real Quick? 
Thomas Engel 

Programming • See page wo 

Motion Synthesis 
Okan Arikan 

Programming • See page 102 

Programming the PlayStation Portable (PSP) 
David Coombes & Peter Young 

Programming • See page 104 

Real-Time Global Illumination 
Eskil Steenberg 

Programming • See page 705 

Republic: Lessons Learned 
Demis Hassabis 

Production • See page 87 

Alan Yu 

Game Developers Conference 

As director of conferences and events, Alan Yu is 
responsible for the Came Developers Conference and 
community relations for the Cama Network. In his 
previous position as program director, Alan developed the 
conference programs and managed speaker relations for both the GDC 
and CAMEXecutive conferences. He is the liaison between the GDC and 
its group of industry advisors and maintains close ties to both the 
developer and publisher communities. Alan is a graduate of Sarah 
Lawrence College in New York. 

Alan Yu recommends these sessions and events: 

Experimental Gameplay Workshop 
Jon Blow 

Game Design • See page 63 

Game Deisgn Methods of ICO 
Kenji Kaido & Fumito Ueda 

Game Design • See page 64 

GAMEHOTEL 

Events and Meetings • See page 24 

Game Developers Choice Awards 

Events and Meetings • See page 21 

AUDIO ADVISORY BOARD 



Buzz Burrowes 

Sony Computer Entertainment America 

Buzz Burrowes is director of audio for Sony Computer 
Entertainment America's Product Development division. 
He manages Sony's multi-room audio recording facilities 
in both San Diego and the San Francisco Bay Area. He is also 
the author of SCEA-PD's audio architecture, a proprietary, full-featured 
audio engine that includes sophisticated streaming, adaptive MIDI, and 
sound scripting cores. 






Brian Schmidt 

Microsoft 

Brian Schmidt currently serves as program manager for 
Xbox audio and media at Microsoft, a recent move from 
his position as program manager for DirectSound and 
DirectMusic on the DirectX audio team. Brian has been in the 
multimedia audio industry since 1987 as both a composer/sound designer 
and technical consultant. As a composer, he has personally composed 
music for more than 120 interactive games, including John Madden 
Football, Jurassic Park, and the Star Wars trilogy, and also composed the 
award-winning music for Crue Ball. He has been contracted for custom 
game music compositions from Aaron Spelling, Michael Jordan, and Joel 
Silver, and his work has been shown in both television and film. His 
"Theme from Narc" (originally done for the videogame Narc) was later 
recorded and released by The Pixies. Prior to working at Microsoft, Brian 
was a freelance consultant, working with such companies as Sega, Sony, 
Capcom, QSound Labs, and several other makers of interactive 
entertainment, designing interactive audio systems including Capcom's 
arcade game audio system and the sound system for SEGA Pinball. 

Tommy Tallarico 

Tommy Tallarico Studios 

Tommy Tallarico is the most successful and accomplished 
videogame composer in history. His music has been heard 
by hundreds of millions of people all over the world on 
media such as videogames, television, motion pictures, radio, 
soundtracks, and even on floats in the Rose Parade in Pasadena. Some of 
Tallarico's top titles include Earthworm Jim 1 & 2, Disney's Aladdin, Cool 
Spot, The Terminator, Madden Football, Prince of Persia, the Test Drive series, 
MDK, Tomorrow Never Dies, Tony Hawk Skateboarding, Spider-Man, Pac-Man 
World, Knockout Kings, and the Blitz Unreal and Time Crisis series. 
Upcoming titles include the highly anticipated Unreal 2, Twisted Metal, 
Metroid Prime, Maximo, and Casper. Tommy has been writing music for 
videogames for over 10 years. Founded in 1994, Tommy Tallarico Studios is 
the industry's largest multimedia post-production audio house on the 
planet, having produced more than 30 titles in 2000 alone. Tommy and 
his team have won more than 20 best-videogame-soundtrack awards 
and have worked on more than 175 games totaling over 50 million units 
sold and grossing over $2 billion in revenue. 

Tommy Tallarico recommends these sessions: 

Entertainment Experience First, Videogame Second: 
The Making of The Return of the King 
Neil Young 

Game Design ■ See page S9 

Game Design Methods of ICO 
Kenji Kaido & Fumito Ueda 

Game Design • See page 64 

Game Soundtracks: Structuring Your Deal like the Movies 
Jim Charne 

Business & Legal • See page 57 

Music Licensing for Videogames: How Popular Music and Artists 

Can Make Games Pop 

Nelson Bae, Seth Berg, Keith D'Arcy, Shawn Le Mone, Victor Rodriguez 

Business & Legal • See page 54 

Triangulation: A Schizophrenic Approach to Game Design 
Will Wright 

Game Design • See page 70 







■19- 



ADVISORY BOARD BIOS & RECOMMENDATIONS 




VISUAL ARTS ADVISORY BOARD 



Cyrus Lum 

Inevitable Entertainment 

Cyrus turn has been an artist 
in the computer game 
industry for over 10 years. He 
got his start at Strategic 
Simulations Inc., creating computer artwork 
for games based on the Advanced Dungeons 
and Dragons license. After 4 years at SSI, 
Cyrus moved on to Crystal Dynamics, Inc.; 
founded Crystal's art department and served 
as the Art Director. His work can be seen in 
such game products as Crash 'n Burn, Total 
Eclipse, and The Horde. Two years later, Cyrus 
packed up and left California for Texas and 
Iguana Entertainment, Inc. There, he founded 
the Advanced Technology Group which 
handles Acclaim Studio's high-end 3D 
rendering, and animation for games. Before 
Cyrus left Acclaim, he served as the Vice 
President of Digital Productions for Acclaim 
Studios where he coordinated and provided 
visionary direction to the advanced computer 
graphic art efforts of Acclaim Studios - Austin, 
Salt Lake Teeside (U.K.), London and the 
Acclaim Studios Cinematic and Motion 
Capture Group. In March of 2000, Cyrus 
cofounded Inevitable Entertainment - a video 
game development company dedicated to 
creating innovative product for the next 
generation game consoles. He serves as 
Inevitable's Art Director. 

Cyrus Lum recommends these sessions: 

Acting for Animators 
Ed Hooks 

Visual Arts • See page 111 

Building Collum 
Bay Raitt 

Visual Arts • See page 112 

The Emotional Heart of Art Direction 
Chris Klug 

Visual Arts, See page 113 

From Visual Anti-Establishment and Back 
John Caeta 

Visual Arts Keynote • See page wg 

The History of Animation 
Phil Tippett 

Visual Arts Keynote • See page no 




Steve Reid 

Red Storm Entertainment 

Steve Reid is the managing 
director for Red Storm 
Entertainment, a division of 
Ubisoft. He is one of the original 
founders of Red Storm (1996), the studio know 
for creating the Tom Clancy line of games. 
After a successful run as an independent 
developer/publisher, Red Storm was acquired 
by Ubisoft Entertainment (2000). Post 
acquisition, Red Storm and Ubisoft have 
worked together to develop new products 
from both the Rainbow Six and Ghost Recon 
franchise lines. ..with Ubisoft adding Splinter 
Cell to the Tom Clancy line. Before games, 
Steve received a Master of Fine Arts degree 
from East Carolina University. He has taught a 
variety of college art disciplines and now 
collaborates with local and national colleges 
as an advisor on digital art curriculum. Steve 
has participated as a moderator, a panelist, 
and a guest speaker at the Game Developer 
Conference. 



Paul Steed 

Microsoft Xbox 

Paul Steed is the author of two 
books on modeling and 
animation: Modeling A 
Character In Max and Animating 
Real-Time Game Characters. He has been 
making computer games for the past 11 years 
having worked for five different companies. 
Most noted for his work at id Software, Steed 
(as likes to be referred to) started his own 
company in November of 2001 to do freelance 
work and a variety of real-time applications. 
Paul enjoys movies, talking about his work and 
of course talking about himself. He has been a 
speaker at the Conference since 1996 and is on 
the Came Developer magazine advisory board. 

Steve Theodore 

Rad Game Tools 

Steve Theodore fell in love 
with computer animation in 
the Dark Ages, in more ways 
than one. Steve dropped out of a 
PhD program in Ancient History to start 
rendering scenes by typing text commands 
into the Brown University mainframe. He 
spent the early '90s doing animations for a 
variety of commercial and television projects. 
In 1995 he joined FASA Interactive in Chicago, 
where he created mechs and environments for 
MechCommander. Two years later he moved to 
Valve, where he worked on Half-Life, Team 





Fortress Classic, Team Fortress 2 and 
Counterstrike. Steve is currently the artist in 
residence at Rad Game Tools. 



Rob Titus 

Naughty Dog 

Rob Titus is the character lead 
at Naughty Dog Inc. Rob 
started with the company in 
1997. Since then, he has modeled, 
rigged, textured and animated characters, in- 
game objects and built backgrounds on Crash 
2, Crash 3, Crash Team Racing and Jak and Daxter. 
Currently working on the sequel to Jak and 
Daxter, Rob splits his time between modeling, 
animation and fixing problems that come up 
with the insanely complex Naughty Dog 
object pipeline. 




See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



Subscribe now 



www.XVzine.com 



WHERE VIDEO PROS GO TO BUY! 




Digital Video Expo East 

July 13-16, 2004 

Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, NY 

Digital Video Expo West 

December 8-10, 2004 

Los Angeles Convention Center, CA 




Media Group 



REGISTER TODAY AT DVEXPO.COM with Priority Code GDC 




GAME DEVELOPERS CHOICE AWARDS 



game 

Developers 

cHOfce 

awaPDS 



Booth 1235 



Every art form has a forum for recognizing its greatest 
achievements. Hollywood has the Oscars, music has the 
Grammys, and we have the Game Developers Choice Awards. 

Started in 2000 with the idea that there is no greater honor than to 
be recognized by one's peers, the Game Developers Choice Awards 
are game development's most prized honors. The Choice Awards are 
meaningful year after year because they are defined and determined 
by those who know games best -their creators. Please join us to 
honor and celebrate the best of today's game developers. 

The 4th Annual Game Developers Choice Awards 

Wednesday, March 24 • 6:30pm • Civic Auditorium 

The ceremony will be immediately followed by cocktails, 
hors d'oeuvres and music, compliments of NVIDIA. 

Stop by the Choice Award Pavilion (Booth 1235) to check out 
the nominated games. 





Awards will be presented in the following categories 

► Lifetime Achievement Award 

► First Penguin Award 

► Rookie Studio Award 

► IGDA Award for Community Contribution 

► Game Innovation Spotlight Award 

► Game of the Year 

► Maverick Award 



Presented by-. 

0igda 



Sponsored by: 



- Original Game Character 

► Excellence in Audio 

► Excellence in Game Design 

► Excellence in Programming 

► Excellence in Visual Arts 

► Excellence in Writing 




AVIDIA 




See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



-22- 



www.gdconf.com 



THE 6TH ANNUAL INDEPENDENT GAMES FESTIVAL 




INDEPENDENT 
GAMES FESTIVAL 



The Independent Games Festival was established in 1998 
to reward innovation in independent games. 



Booth 1514 



The IGF Competition is open to all independent developers and awards $40,000 in cash 
prizes to games in six different categories: Innovation in Visual Arts, Innovation in Audio, 
Innovation in Game Design, Technical Excellence, Audience Award, and the Seumas 
McNally Award for Independent Game of the Year. For the first time, each of these six 
awards will be given out in an "open" category as well as a "web/downloadable" category. 

The IGF Awards Ceremony will take place during the 4th Annual Game Developers Choice 
Awards on Wednesday, March 24 at 6:30pm in the Civic Auditorium. 



. 



Open Category: 

► ACMI {{PARK}} 

Selectparks 
www.selectparks.net 

►• Anito: Defend a Land Enraged 

Anino Computer Entertainment, Inc. 
www.aninoentertainment.com 

► Bontago 

Circular Logic (a DigiPen student team) 
www.allwest.com/~sanderso 

► Facade 

lnteractiveStory.net and The Georgia 
Institute of Technology 
www.interactivestory.net 

► Fashion Cents 

My Game Company 

www.mygamecompany.com/ 

Products/FashionCents/main.htm 

► FuzzeeTeevee 

Gastronaut Studios 
www.gastronautstudios.com 

► Savage: The Battle for Newerth 

S2 Games 
www.s2games.c0m 

► Spartan 

Slitherine Software UK Ltd 
www.slitherine.co.uk 

- Starshatter 
Destroyer Studios 
www.starshatter.com 

►- Take Command: 1861 The Civil War 

MadMinute Games, Inc. 
www.madminutegames.com 



Web/Downloadable: 

► AlphaOUEUE 

Large Animal 
www.largeanimal.com 

► Beesly's Buzzwords 

Flashbang Studios, LLC 
www.flashbangstudios.biz/buzzwords 

► Billiard Boxing 

Shizmoo Games, Inc. 
www.shizmoo.com 

► Chomp! Chomp! Safari 

AstroManic Studios 
www.astromanic.com 

► Dr. Blob's Organism 

Digital Eel 
www.digital-eel.com/organism 

► Dungeon Scroll 

Robinson Technologies 
www.rtsoft.com/dscroll 

►- GlSH 

Chronic Logic LLC 
www.chroniclogic.com/gish.htm 

► Oasis 

Mind Control Software 
www.mind-control.com/oasis.html 

► Space Station Manager 

Mistaril 
www.mistrail.com/ssm.php 

► Yohoho! Puzzle Pirates 

Three Rings Design, Inc. 
www.puzzlepirates.com 



Student Showcase Selections: 

► Dark Archon2 

University of Utah 

► Fatal Traction 

Full Sail Real World Education 

► Growbot 

Georgia Institute of Technology 

► Hex Vex 

Linkopings Universitet (Sweden) 

►• Hyperbol 

University of California, Irvine 

► Ice Wars 

Digi Pen Institute of Technology 

KlIBE KOMBAT 

Georgia Institute of Technology 

►■ Scrapped 

Digi Pen Institute of Technology 

► Treefort Wars 

Iowa State University 

► Xazzon 

Royal Institute of Technology 



Platinum Sponsors: 

A AOL 

for BROADBAND 



cnRDeQN 

OeOwHrlTJ. 

P£JUI£JIP£JJlf 



Cold Sponsors "Open" Category: 



DIRECTX 




Intel 



Download the finalist games at dlx.gamespot.com 



/here aamers oo to know ' 



Where gamers go to know 




The game community's source 





Interactive Storytelling: 

Techniques for 21st Century Fiction 

Andrew Glassner 

March 2004; $35.00; 528 pages 

We are on the verge of developing an exciting new kind of interactive story 
form that will involve audiences as active participants. In this book, Andrew 
Glassner provides a solid foundation in the fundamentals of classical story 
and game structure and addresses the challenges in bringing these two 
activities together. 

Interactive Storytelling: 

Provides solid foundations in classical story and game structure 

Clearly articulates the issues of interactive storytelling 

Discusses past and present approaches 

Presents a wide range of new ideas and techniques 

Offers a large number of experiments and new directions for the future 



"I found this book both enlightening and a good tool to test and temper my own beliefs 
on the subject. It combines solid foundational material with clear insights into current 
problems along with possible solutions, all in a readable style." 

—Eric Haines, co-author of Real-Time Rendering, 2nd Edition 

"Glassner's book shows remarkable insight into the problems of game design, 
combined with a powerful analytical approach to the problems of insinuating 
storytelling elements into games. He rejects the concept of interactive storytelling and 
offers instead his notion of 'participatory' storytelling. The result is an unconventional 
and cleverly thought-out collection of ideas relating stories and games." 

—Chris Crawford, author of Chris Crawford on Game Design 



high-level graphics, 
programming, and game 
design books. 



Audio 
Anecdotes 




■Km gw"*"" 



r8arz*( 



Audio Anecdotes: 

Tools, Tips, and Techniques for Digital Audio 

Ken Greenebaum, Ronen Barzel, editors 

March 2004; $59.00; 512 pages 

Audio Anecdotes tells the story of digital sound and music: analyzing, 
processing, creating, and recording. It is packed with articles focusing on the 
opportunities created by digital media, now possible because of inexpensive 
and readily available equipment. 

"Sound is such an important part of our lives, and should get more attention 
in the computer space (in user interfaces, games, data mining, etc.). This 
book fills a wonderful void in providing a lot of small introductory articles, 
useful for anyone interested in computational sound." 

—Perry R. Cook, author of Real Sound Synthesis 



uuujiiJ.ahpeters.com 



Publisher of 

■b£ journal of 

E j, graphics tools 







Stop by booth #1706 

to see these books and other 

new titles from A K Peters 



A K Peters, Ltd. 



63 South Avenue 
Natick, MA 01760 USA 
Tel: (508) 655 9933 
Fax: (508) 655 5847 
www.akpeters.com 
service@akpeters.com 



-24- 



www.gdconf.com 




games & digital pop culture 



Thursday, March 25 
6-8pm • Civic Auditorium 

From Hong Kong's wildest action figure designers to MTV Best Music 
Award-winning directors and an all-star line-up of game visionaries 
from Japan, Europe, and the US - all will come together in a vibrant 
setting, as GAMEHOTEL plays host to an intoxicating cocktail of 
luminaries from inside and outside the games industry. 

As a new addition to GDC, GAMEHOTEL (a highly successful event series 
launched in Paris in 2003) spotlights the intense desire of industry 
players as well as a growing audience, for a rich and diverse future of 
interactive entertainment. 

Expect a refreshing and exuberant show chock full of highlights, 
screenings, talks and showcases - as well as a whole lot of fun. You'll walk 
away from GAMEHOTEL with your brain bursting with fresh ideas and a 
deeper understanding of games as a driving force of today's pop culture. 

The stellar lineup of the two-hour show: 

The desire to constantly expand the horizon of video games has lead 
visionary Tetsuya Mizuguchi (Space Channel 5, Sega Rally Championship) 
to design the mind-blowing musical shooter Rez. Check in at GAMEHOTEL 
to find out what's currently on his radar. 

Directors Ludovic Houplain, Herve de Crecy, and Francois Alaux, from 
French studio H5, have crafted some of the most beautiful clips of past 
few years. Prepare to be surprised by their ever-expanding adventures in 
music video, like their twisted CG homage to a roster of dance icons 
(from Prince and James Brown to Michael Jackson and Jamiroquai). 

With a keen eye on the future of games, SCEE's Executive Vice President, 
Development, Phil Harrison played a critical role in the successful launch 
of Sony's EyeToy. To him, this was only a guidepost for things to come in 
the near future, as novel interfaces open up new gameplay possibilities, 
paving the way for mass acceptance of gaming. 





From PaRappathe Rapper to Vib Ribbon all the way to his latest tour de 
force Mojibribon, Masaya Matsuura, master of eccentric excellence, 
stretches the elastic boundaries of the games medium, and provides 
inspiration well beyond the confines of the industry. 

Miho & Ryosuke Tei from hyper-active designer collective FuriFuri 
Company relentlessly redefine Toyko's pop culture continuum with their 
visual madness. Their Manga-style characters move virally through the 
many levels of toys, videogames, TV or fashion brands. 

CEO of up-and-coming development studio Newtgames, Mathieu 
Castelli knows how to seduce women. His ambition was to develop a 
location-based wireless game as exciting as the massively multiplayer 
games targeted at hardcore gamers. And guess what? It turns out the 
vast majority of the subscribers to this stylish Tokyo-based game are 
women. 

A dazzling selection of outstanding Urban Vinyls from the likes of 
Michael Lau, Brothersfree, Eric So, Koji Takeuchi, and many more, will be 
on display at GAMEHOTEL's infamous Designer Toy Showcase, set up in 
collaboration with KIDROBOT. An absolute must for action figure 
aficionados and novices alike, where you may very well discover some of 
tomorrow's game heroes. 

Please visit the GAMEHOTEL website at www.gamehotel.net for full 
lineup and program details. 

Presented by: 








EXPO PASS SESSIONS 



Panel - All 

Came Design Challenge: The Love Story 
Raph Koster, Warren Spector, Will Wright, 
Eric Zimmerman 

See pages nj-i4ifor bios 
Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 
A3, Convention Center 

What would happen if commercial constrains 
were removed the from the game design 
process? What if developers were free to 
create games that were radically experi- 
mental? How would designers react if they 
were confronted with some of the great 
unsolved game design problems? In the Game 
Design Challenge, you get to see how game 
design veterans answer these questions. 

A few months before the GDC, the panelists in 
the Game Design Challenge were given a 
design problem: come up with a concept for a 
game that tells a love story. At the Game 
Design Challenge session, they each present 
their solution. Each love story game concept 
offers a very different approach to this 
particular game design challenge, and each 
has been conceived for different gaming 
platform. In addition to presenting their game 
concepts, the panelists are able to critique 
each others' work and the audience is also be 
encouraged to join in the critical discussion as 
well. 

More than just a design exercise, the Game 
Design Challenge asks expert game designers 
to think on their feet as they address 
important game design problems. Their 
answers to the challenge just might contain 
the seeds of gaming's future. Expect an 
unpredictable session of innovative and 
unusual game design ideas along with free- 
wheeling dialogue and debate. 

Takeaway: Each game concept that the 
panelists present is a "snapshot" of the early 
game design process. In this way, the audience 
get a glimpse of how game designers 
formulate game concepts and begin to sketch 
them out into a full-fledged design. Critique, 
discussion, and debate is also an important 
part of concept development, and there is 
plenty of critical feedback among the 
panelists as well. Attendees will get a glimpse 
into some very original thinking about how to 
solve difficult game design problems. 

Intended Audience: This session is intended 
for game designers, project leaders, and others 
involved in the conceptual aspects of game 
design and game development. Anyone 
interested in new ideas and out-of-the- 



ordinary game designs is encouraged to 
attend. Bring an open mind and an interest in 
hearing unusual approaches to game design 
from some of the most established designers 
in the industry. 

Lecture - All 

Make Better Criticism: A Mature Form of 

Cultural Analysis 

Matteo Bittanti See page 118 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:306:30pm 

Salon IV, Marriott 

"If a tree falls in a forest and nobody hears it, 
does the tree make a noise? Does it even 
exist?" 

What does this classic philosophical dilemma 
have to do with videogames? Everything. 

In this lecture, Matteo Bittanti argues that 
what the game industry really needs today is 
not only better games, but rather, better 
criticism. Whereas the production of games 
has made staggering advances in the last 
thirty years, the so-called professional game 
analysis has not really evolved. Rather, it 
regressed. Even today, the vast majority of 
videogame magazines are simply "magalogs," 
consumer guides that talk about games in 
terms of their technical aspects, often relying 
on unintelligible, esoteric, and self-referential 
argot. Professional game criticism does not 
really explain why games work, how games 
work, and what effect they have on people. 
Will game criticism ever become a mature 
form of cultural analysis? Will it develop 
concise, systematic yet accessible concepts 
that apply to games, or will it remain a form 
of juvenile pastime? More importantly, can it 
become interesting for people who play 
games and for people who don't play (but 
always wanted to)? 

Takeaway: The GDC categorical imperative is 
"make better games. "It's time for an update: 
"make better criticism." Why? Because if you 
can't explain if, why, how, and when the tree 
fell in the forest, nobody is going to care about 
the tree. This lecture provides some hints and 
tips on becoming better park rangers. 

Lecture - All 

Pitching an Original IP: Notes from the 

Field 

Chris Charla See page no for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

Salon III, Marriott 

Getting the chance to develop an original IP 
into a game is the holy grail for the 



independent developer, as well as for many 
teams inside larger companies. Taking an 
original IP to market is the riskiest play a 
publisher can make, but the one with the 
greatest potential rewards. How can an 
independent developer, or a team inside a 
larger company successfully pitch an original 
IP, or totally new game style? Digital Eclipse 
has gained considerable experience since it 
first started showing an original game, and 
engine, behind closed doors, at last year's GDC. 
This one hour session shares some of the 
successes and failures the company has 
experienced over the past year, and in the 
process helps other developers, whether 
independent or part of a larger organization, 
understand what it takes to attempt to get 
funding for their original projects. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave with a better 
understanding of both the general things that 
they need to successfully present an original 
game idea, as well as the specific things that 
the top tier (and second tier) publishers are 
looking for today when evaluating an original 
IP (or, to a lesser extent, an original engine). 
Additionally, attendees leave with a good 
understanding of where their work pitching 
and developing an original IP will lead, even if 
their game doesn't get made, there could be 
beneficial outcomes (as there already have 
been for Digital Eclipse). 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



■26- 



www.gdconf.com 



" 



EXPO PASS SESSIONS 



Lecture - Intermediate 

Practical Shadows: Out of the Demo and Into the Engine 

Tom Forsyth See page 123 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • g-ioam 

A3, Convention Center 

There are many shadowing algorithms available, such as blob shadows, 
shadow maps of various types, projective shadow maps, and stencil 
volume shadows. But they all have limitations, some of them work on 
some platforms and not others, each is appropriate for different 
situations. 

This lecture introduces each method and briefly discusses their major 
features and limitations. It then explores how to mix and match the 
various methods in a practical large-world engine on real console 
hardware. The lecture is mainly about the tricks and tips, where corners 
can be cut, when to use each technique, and the efficiency and 
scalability of each. The emphasis is using these methods in a practical 
game with large, complex and unconstrained scenes, rather than simply 
writing a technology demo. 

Takeaway: The lecture introduces the audience to the variety of 
shadowing algorithms available, and discusses when each is appropriate 
for the type of scene, the desired effect, and the available hardware. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

User-testing in a Hostile Environment: Overcoming Apathy and 

Resistance in Came Companies 

Bill Fulton & Ramon Romero See pages 123 & 135 for bios 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-ii:3oam 

J3, Convention Center 

The importance of formal user-testing methods (i.e., methods developed 
by psychologists and HCI/Usability researchers for testing products with 
consumers) as a means of improving games in development has been a 
growing topic of interest among game developers in the past few years. 
However, mere anecdotes and examples of the value of these methods 
are unlikely to get a game company or publisher to "dip a toe in" and 
even investigate these formal methods; getting them to 'take the 
plunge' and make large changes to the standard game development 
process that increase costs can be seemingly impossible and take years. 

The primary goal of this talk is to share some insight in ways to advocate 
user-testing in a company where important staff may be apathetic or 
resistant to changing from the usual development process. The 
secondary goal is to share some guidelines for how to create user-testing 
processes that raise the likelihood that user-testing will 'catch on' and 
eventually become integrated in the standard development cycle. 

This talk is the third in series on user-testing and games, and is designed 
for an audience that understands the basic concepts of user-testing, 
believes that they are valuable, and wants to begin 'evangelizing' user- 
testing to a company that is apathetic or even hostile to the idea. This 
talk does NOT make the case that user-testing is useful, go into detail on 
specific user-testing methods or show anecdotes from real gamers, 
because that was covered in two previous GDC talks. Both talks can be 
downloaded at www.microsoft.com/playtest/publications.htm. 

This talk is a case study from two of the four founding members of the 
Games User-testing Group at Microsoft Game Studios, which does user- 
testing on all titles that Microsoft develops or publishes. They have help 
grow the group from one researcher in 1997 to 37 in 2003. 



Takeaway: Members of the audience take away opinions and insight for 
how to overcome significant apathy or resistance about the idea of 
doing user-testing in a game company. The audience will also get 
principles for how to increase the likelihood that early user-testing 
efforts are successful, and prove their value. 

Intended Audience: The intended audience for this talk is anyone who is 
already convinced of the value of user-testing and is looking to 
"evangelize" it and have it play a greater role in a game development 
company or publisher. Designers, producers, and managers trying to 
advocate user-testing in their company, and HCI/usability professionals 
trying to break into the games business should find it useful. Having at 
least a conceptual understanding of the value of user-testing is 
necessary for this talk to be informative. 




-27- 



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GameDeveloper c ™ g t°ZtZ 

only print publication that delivers technical 
how-to features, industry news, and product 
reviews to professional game developers. Each 
month the most renowned and respected 
developers in the industry explain the technology 
behind the most successful and innovative 
games to 35,000 readers, making this truly the 
publication "by game developers, for game 
developers." Check out the magazine at 
www.gdmag.com. 

■4 A K Peters publishes the journal of 
iW/^A graphics tools as well as advanced 
I books for game developers. New 
B^J I titles for 2004 include: Interactive 
Y^Q I Storytelling: Techniques for 21st 
* ™ Century Fiction, Alfor Computer 
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Character Animation, and C# and Came 
Programming: A Beginner's Guide. Contact us 
to discuss new book and journal ideas. 
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MAT! 



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Animation Magazine 
reports on all aspects 
of animation 
worldwide and is the 
most comprehensive source about technology, 
film, television, gaming, commercials, 
conferences, events and trends. Our subscribers in 
78 countries are involved in the animation 
process directly, including animators, producers, 
directors, executives, broadcasters, agencies, 
distributors, publishers, recruiters, teachers and 
students. In addition to the print magazine, we 
also provide subscribers with daily news emailed 
directly to them. 

Animation World Network 
(AWN.com) is the leading and most 
respected professional online 
publisher of news, information and 
resources, devoted to the art, craft 
and industry of animation, visual effects, gaming 
and related industries. Publishers of four 
different free comprehensive business and school 
directories, three weekly newsletters as well as 
the portal siteVFXWorld.com and online buyers 
guide AIDB.com, AWN is visited by more than 
150,000 unique readers from more than 100 
countries every month. 

f% . <\ Computer Graphics 

UOmpUter „——. World provides 

The Maeaime tor Digits! Content Professionals liHIIW ■ . ., ■ , , 

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professionals essential information on the 
creation and production tools and applications 
necessary to make them successful. The award- 
winning editorial covers innovative technology 
and how it is applied in film, TV, gaming, graphic 
arts, and Web applications. Each month, 
Computer Graphics World presents product news, 
user stories, industry analysis, in-depth features, 



develop 



Dr.Dohh's 



and hands-on reviews. Combined with a bi- 
monthly e-newsletter and a Web site with news 
exclusives, Computer Graphics World provides an 
information-rich media platform serving readers 
24/7. Visit www.cgw.com for more information. 

Develop is the must-read 
monthly magazine of over 
8,000 game programmers, 
artists, designers, musicians and producers. 
Written by industry insiders, it offers news and 
views on all the latest game development trends, 
while the unique Develop Directory is a one-stop 
shop for anyone looking for new staff or 
specialist services. Subscribers in 43 countries. 

Dr. Dobb's Journal is the 
premier language and 
platform independent 
monthly magazine for serious developers. Each 
month we provide powerful programming insights 
in topics ranging from advanced algorithms to 
database development to computer security over 
all languages and platforms, plus evaluations of 
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important to today's developer. As one Dr. Dobb's 
Journal reader said: "Dr. Dobb's Journal is one of 
those MUST-HAVE periodicals on your software 
development bookshelf." Click on our web site to 
subscribe today: www.ddj.com. 

GAME. FACE CAME FACE Ma 9 azme 

** >^*wfc is a cultural computer- 

and video game developer publication from 
Berlin Germany. GAME FACE takes views on 
computer and video games by looking at them as 
a global cultural phenomenom. Hereby GAME 
FACE inaugurates the making-off perspective on 
games (similar to films). GAME FACE is being 
published in German language and distributed 
by suet Verlag. 

MCV is the only weekly trade title 
for the interactive entertainment 
industry. With a circulation in 



MCV 

excess of 11,000 and subscribers in 57 countries, 
MCV covers software development, publishing, 
finance, retail, distribution and marketing. MCV is 
published weekly, with an exclusive email news 
service for international readers. 






Mobile Entertainment 

Analyst 

(www.mobenta.com) is 

the leading hub for 
decisionmakers in the mobile entertainment 
industry. Encompassing a website, our weekly 
email newsletter (www.mobenta.com/wir), our 
monthly industry journal (www.mobenta.com/mea) 
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Content Tracking Service (www.mobenta.com/wcts), 
Mobile Entertainment Analyst provides our 
industry with insightful, actionable information. 

The Mobile Entertainment 
Forum (MEF) is a global trade 
association representing all 
participants in the mobile 
entertainment value chain 
interested in driving the 
industry's evolution and commercial potential 
through collaboration, consultation and 
promotional activities. MEF is committed to 
reducing the barriers to entry into the innovative 
mobile entertainment market, thereby 
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increasing competition and growth to the benefit 
of all industry players and consumers. MEF's main 
goals are to promote the development of the 



Mobile 

Entertainment 
Forum 



mobile entertainment industry; build awareness 
for the industry and facilitate the development of 
commercial standards and best practices for 
mobile entertainment. For more information, 
please visit: www.mobilentertainmentforum.org 



RCR Wireless News is the 
jj, premier news source for the 



gBHEEg 



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industry. Published since 1981, RCR Wireless News 
is the only weekly newspaper reporting on 
cellular/PCS, data, paging, WLAN and broadband. 
The newspaper targets top-level wireless 
executives. RCR Wireless News also offers daily 
news alerts as well as breaking news when it 
occurs. To register for those services, go to 
www.rcrnews.com. RCR Wireless News is owned 
by Crain Communications Inc. 

Slashdot Games' mission 
is to bring the latest 
Games ■ games siashdoi.org gaming news to the 
worldwide technology community. Editors post 
news throughout the day, inviting debate and 
discussion. Covering games and more, Slashdot is 
a lightening rod for what's going on in the world 
of technophiles — cultural, technical, political and 
business related. 

f^ | I f^ p^f Today's gamer demands a 

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shape. SURGE checks the pulse of gaming from 
every angle: the games, the gear, and the 
developers who create our virtual addictions. 
Every issue of SURGE features breaking news, 
insider info, celebrity interviews, reviews of the 
hottest new titles and jaw-dropping technology 
changing the face of gaming. 
www.surgemag.com 




m> 



Covering everything from 
skateboarding, surfing, and 
motocross to mountain 
climbing and deep-sea 
exploration, Xtreme Video Magazine 
(www.xvzine.com) is a quarterly from the 
publishers of DV magazine that celebrates 
capturing life in the extreme. Feature stories and 
photo essays take readers behind the scenes to 
reveal the secrets of capturing the action on 
video and in photographs. 

Wireless Week is the Wireless 
■ it, ^ Authority. Its daily e-letter, 

\A/lPP DPP web site and twice-monthly 
fill Lj Cuu newsmagazine follow 

w E E " industry developments and 
provide analysis, perspective and business 
insights for the carriers, enterprise users, retailers, 
and others wireless professionals who make up 
its audience. Only Wireless Week invites 
subscribers to choose between a traditional 
printed newsmagazine or a cutting-edge, 
interactive digital edition offering identical 
content to the printed version but with quicker 
delivery, powerful search capabilities 
and more. 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of GDC 2004. 



W W W . I S □ R . O R S / R W R R D S 



4TH RNNURL GAME DEVELOPERS CHDICE RWflRDS 





Youre inviTed 

to honor and celebrate the best of todays game developers. 



game 

Developers 

CHDICe 

awanos 



Wednesday, March 24th, 6:30 pm 
San Jose Civic Auditorium 
145 West San Carlos Street 

(Across the street from the Convention Center) 

The Choice Awards recognize games and developers chosen 
by those who know games best-their creators. 

The ceremony is open to all GDC attendees and will be 
immediately followed by cocktails, hors d'oeuvres and 
music, compliments of NVIDIA. 

The Independent Games Festival awards ceremony precedes 
the Game Developers Choice Awards. 



SPONSORED BY <<g^ | ^ ^ II D X A * RESENTED BY Q^JgCla 



MEDIA SPONSOR 



li 




-29- 



SPEAKERS FROM JAPAN 



The CDC is proud to host many speakers from Japan each and every year. 

This year, every session will be simultaneously translated from Japanese to English. 




Kenji Kaido 



► GAME DESIGN 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Wants and Instincts 
Tetsuya Mizuguchi 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 
J3, Convention Center 

*f» This lecture is simultaneously translated. 
Please arrive early to pick up your headset. 

See page 70 for description. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
The Evolution of a Franchise: 
The Legend of Zelda 
Eiji Aonuma 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 
J3, Convention Center 

<§* This lecture is simultaneously translated. 
Please arrive early to pick up your headset. 

See page 63 for description. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Came Design Methods of ICO 
Kenji Kaido & Fumito Ueda 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:306:30pm 
J3, Convention Center 

•1* This lecture is simultaneously translated. 
Please arrive early to pick up your headset. 

See page 64 for description. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Came Design: Risk and Return 
Masahiro Sakurai 

Wednesday, March 24 • i2-i:3opm 
J3, Convention Center 

<i» This lecture is simultaneously translated. 
Please arrive early to pick up your headset. 

See page 64 for description. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

A Peek Behind the Shoji: Japan's Videogame 

Market Today 

Ryoichi Hasegawa 

Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 
J3, Convention Center 

<8» This lecture is simultaneously translated. 
Please arrive early to pick up your headset. 

See page 67 for description. 



Lecture - Intermediate 

The Secret of Pac-Man's Success: Making 

Fun First 

Toru Iwatani 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 
J3, Convention Center 

'•• This lecture is simultaneously translated. 
Please arrive early to pick up your headset. 

See page 68 for description. 

Workshop 

Experimental Cameplay Workshop 

KeitaTakahashi 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-6pm 
J2, Convention Center 

See page 63 for description. 



► PROGRAMMING 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Practical Implementation of High Dynamic 

Range Rendering 

Masaki Kawase 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 
J3, Convention Center 

'§• This lecture is simultaneously translated. 
Please arrive early to pick up your headset. 

See page 103 for description. 




Fumito Ueda 




Euji Aunoma 




KeitaTakahashi 




Riyoichi Hasegawa 




See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 





! G4TV.COM 

WANNA SEE YOUR GAME ON G4? 
CALL US AT (310) 979-5000. 



I 111 Ei 



i: 

ill 



© 2004 G4 Media, LLC. All right* 





•31- 



TUTORIALS 



TWO DAY TUTORIALS 
MONDAY, MARCH 22 & 
TUESDAY, MARCH 23 

> (348) • Serious Games Summit 
Ernest Adams, Chris Crawford, Noah Falstein, 
Anders Frank, James Paul Gee, Robert 
Gehorsam, Edmond A. Heinbockel, JC Herz, 
Randy Hinrichs, Dr. Henry Jenkins, Andrew 
Kimball, Michael O'Shea, Chinwe Onyekere, 
Marc Prensky, David Rejeski, Ben Sawyer, 
David Squire, Kurt Squire, Jack Thorpe, Stefaan 
van Hooydonk, Col. Casey Wardynski, Doug 
Whatley, Michael Zyda 
See pages 117-141 for bios 
ioam-6pm • A6, Convention Center 

The Serious Games Summit is a two-day event 
covering the intersection of games, learning, 
policy and management. Today, major 
corporations, government and military 
institutions, foundations, educators and non- 
profits are turning to games and commercial 
entertainment technologies as an exciting new 
approach to solving problems. 

The result is a new field where computer and 
video games are applied to "serious" purposes 
other than entertainment that represents a 
growing financial outlet for game developers, 
where projects can produce social return in 
addition to an economic one. 

To help share current knowledge, expand 
communication among peers and advance 
emergent best practices, the Summit brings 
together a number of speakers, presentations 
and panels that will appeal to customers, 
developers and evangelizers of serious games. 

Intended Audience: The Serious Games 
Summit agenda is designed to address shared 
and specific areas of concern to several key 
groups interested in this topic. This includes 
professional developers who want to 
understand how to develop new business in 
this emerging market, educators and gaming 
advocates looking at new ways to utilize 
interactive game technologies, and represen- 
tatives from corporate, government and non- 
government organizations who are looking to 
fund and utilize game projects to advance 
specific needs, and organizational agendas. 
Content at the summit addresses all of these 
issues and more relevant to each key 
constituency. 

Takeaway: Attendees of the Serious Games 
Summit learn how extensive the application of 
games and game technology is and can be 
outside of the traditional use of entertainment. 
Attendees also gain considerable hands-on 
insight on how to successfully launch new 



serious game projects and advance things 
beyond the experiments and pioneering 
endeavors that have taken place so far. This 
includes developers learning how to attack new 
markets, and potential users obtaining a much 
deeper level of understanding on how to make 
their present and future projects much more 
successful. 

► (351) • Developer Business Summit: An 
IGDAThink-Tank 

Jason Delia Rocca, Michael Gartenberg, Bing 
Gordon, Robert Huebner, Karl Jeffery, Ray 
Muzyka.Tamra Nestler Fionda, Kathy 
Schoback, Greg Richardson, Eric Zimmerman 
See pages 117-141 for bios 
ioam-6pm • Ai, Convention Center 

Despite the overall growth and progress of the 
games industry, there are countless issues and 
barriers that must be dealt with in order for the 
business of games to truly succeed. While there 
is no question that studios are in this business 
to make great games, be competitive and 
prosper, there are meta-level business issues 
that affect us day-to-day that we need to come 
together as a community and deal with or at 
least explore. 

ThisThink-Tank provides a rare opportunity for 
studio heads, publishing executives and other 
industry leaders to come together in a neutral 
forum, roll up their sleeves and work out 
solutions to some of the biggest issues facing 
game development studios today: 

- Developer/publisher relations 

- Contracting and negotiation practices 

- Risk aversion and original content 

- Intellectual property rights 

- Funding and cash-flow management 

- Alternative business models 

- Corporate strategy and long-term planning 

- Retail and consumer relations 

- Perceptions within the greater business 
community 

- Hiring and quality of life practices 

These issues, and more, are explored and 
discussed in a pragmatic 
manner. The outcome is a mutual 
understanding of the business issues facing 
developers and possible solutions that can be 
implemented to overcome them. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave the Think-Tank with 
a wealth of ideas on how to run their 
companies better and overcome some of the 
big-picture issues they deal with on a daily 
basis. The goal is to improve the industry by 
empowering developers with needed 
knowledge. 



Intended Audience: This is an advanced, expert 
level program. The Think-Tank is intended for 
industry veterans managing game 
development studios, publisher executives and 
other industry leaders who care about the 
strength and future growth of their companies 
and the game development community. Also, 
attendees are expected to become actively 
involved and contribute during the group work 
exercises. 

► (353) • Game Tuning Workshop 
Jonathan Hamel, Robin Hunicke, Frank Lantz, 
Marc LeBlanc, Andrew Leker, Steve Librande, 
Art Min, Harvey Smith, Tim Stellmach, Bernie 

Yee See pages 117-141 for bios 

ioam-6pm • C1, C3, C4, Convention Center 

This intensive two-day workshop explores the 
concept of tuning in-game design. Through 
hands-on activities, group discussion, analysis 
and critique, attendees immerse themselves in 
the iterative process of refining a game design 
and discover formal abstract design tools that 
help them think more clearly about their 
designs and make better games. 

Game design is an iterative process. In any 
medium, the final quality of a game depends 
on many cycles of experimentation, analysis 
and revision, also known as tuning. This tuning 
process is the focus of the workshop. It presents 
a formal approach to game design, in which 
games are viewed as systems, and analyzed in 
terms of their Mechanics, Dynamics and 
Aesthetics. 

Before we can even begin to design a game, we 
need to understand our aesthetic goals. In 
other words, we need to enumerate all the 
kinds of "fun" that we hope the game provide 
its users. We can formalize our understanding 
of our game's aesthetic goals by formulating an 
aesthetic model for each goal, a formal 
description of the goal that identifies its criteria 
for success and possible modes of failure. The 
workshop presents a handful of aesthetic 
models as examples, and also encourage 
attendees to formulate their own. Attendees 
use game design exercises to practice using 
aesthetic models as a yardstick to measure 
their progress through the tuning process. 

Working in small groups, attendees are given 
specific games to play and analyze them in 
terms of aesthetic goals and models. Several 
different games are explored, and common 
game design themes are identified as different 
groups share their results. For each game that 
they analyze, attendees are presented with a 
concrete design exercise to undertake. An 
exercise might involve adding a new feature, 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



■32- 



www.gdconf.com 



TUTORIALS 




accommodating a new goal or requirement, or fixing a design flaw. These 
exercises challenge attendees to analyze and identify the design principles 
at work in a game, and to think flexibly and creatively while working 
within design constraints. In addition, these exercises serve as a starting 
point for discussing how the tuning process applies to games in digital 
and non-digital media. 

In addition to these analysis-and-revision exercises, attendees gain further 
practical experience working with these models through brief collabo- 
rative design projects, brainstorming sessions, critical analysis and 
discussion. 

Takeaway: Game designers and programmers leave this workshop with 
new abstract tools for analyzing and improving their own game designs, a 
deeper understanding of iterative design, and other lessons that emerge 
from the small group discussions with their peers. 

ONE DAY TUTORIALS 
MONDAY, MARCH 22 

► (358) • How to Write an Unforgettable Story 
John McLean-Foreman See page 130 for bio 
ioam-6pm • Ji, Convention Center 

Traditionally, good storytelling has been given low priority in videogames. 
There is a certain logic to this as it is the gameplay that makes a game, not 
the story. What the story does however, is that it gives the gameplay a 
purpose beyond repetitive hacking and slashing, and collecting power ups. 
A good story, properly used, will make a good game great, and a great 
game legendary. To become a master storyteller takes years of study and 
practice. This is just the beginning. 

The one day tutorial covers: 

- Designing protagonists and antagonists 

- Character arcs 

- Show, don't tell: avoiding undramatized exposition 

- How to study and replicate sharp dialogue 

- The importance of: Research 

- Destroying cliche 

- Establishing ideas: making the impossible believable 

- The use of backstory: creating a realistic world 

- Film study: How to analyze scenes from movies 

- Opening game cutscenes: bad vs. good 

- Dramatic choice 

- How to create emotional responses in players 
-Creating the illusion of choice in a linear game 

Takeaway: A keen interest in the mechanics of storytelling and a 
willingness to participate in discussions. 

Intended Audience: Participants are not only gaining an understanding of 
the basic building blocks of what makes a great story, but more 
importantly, they know whether they want to dedicate the time required 
to master the art of storytelling. 

► (331) • Playtestinc Strategies 

Michelle Gamboa, Ray Kowalewski, Prodipto Roy 

See pages 723, u8, 135 for bios 
ioam-6pm • Fi, Convention Center 

When balancing a game, usually designers and testers find that changes 
that look good on paper, do not work in actuality. Moreover, often a 
change that accomplishes what it was intended to will have impact in 



areas it was not. Different game types require different strategies for play 
balance. The purpose of this class is to discuss different game types in 
abstract and how to balance them, followed by drilling down on specific 
games. This tutorial helps identify what to play balance, how to draw the 
most from playtest results, and what differences exist in balancing games 
of different genres and platforms. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn how to drill down on a game to identify what 
to look for when play balancing. They learn strategies for balancing 
specific game types, as well as methods for gaining the most useful 
information from playtest results. Time is allowed to discuss and 
brainstorm on balancing specific games. 

Intended Audience: This tutorial is for game designers or testers who are 
responsible for or interested in play balancing games. 

► (333) • Creativity Boot Camp 
Paul Schuytema See page 136 for bio 
ioam-6pm • J3, Convention Center 

The Creativity Boot Camp is an immerseive day of high-energy work with 
one goal in mind: to hone your most vital and important piece of 
software — your creative mind. This tutorial lays the groundwork by 
exploring your mind, your creative intelligences and the "care and feeding" 
of your gray matter.The bulk of the day is spent in high-energy exercises 
that focus on exercising your creative muscles and then applying those 
muscles to the all-important tasks of game design and game visualization. 
Attendees explore creative-calisthenics that will improve the functioning 
of their own creative mind, as well as the functioning of the "hive mind" 
(team-based creative work). Participants also work through a series of RRD 
(Rapid Result Designing) exercises, both individually and in small teams, 
which will enable them to see how a nimble creative mind can truly 
enhance the design and development process. While the subject of this 
tutorial is creativity, the approach is practical and is focused on delivering 
tools and understanding to the participants so they can leave the session 
with new skills that they can put to work immediately, not just abstract 
concepts. 

Takeaway: The takeaways from this tutorial are: 

- A working understanding of how the creative mind works and how to 
maximize its potential physiologically; 

- A set of techniques and exercises aimed at enhancing the performance 
of one's own creative intelligence; 

- Techniques and exercises to utilize creative firepower in the realm of 
game design and development, both in the realm of individual design 
and group design and planning; 

- "Screamsheets", short documents covering the key issues in the tutorial, 
designed for easy reference later. 

Intended Audience: This tutorial presents tools and techniques aimed at 
the game design process. Game designers are the primary audience for 
this tutorial, but the tutorial is also geared to development teams who 
think, plan and brainstorm in small to medium sized groups (which could 
included producers, content creators, programmers, writers, etc.). 

► (336) • Goodbye Postmortems, Hello Critical Stage Analysis 
Wolfgang Hamann See page 125 for bio 

ioam-6pm • A2, Convention Center 

What is a postmortem? A cynical definition might be: a common artifact 
of the game development process whereby the game industry documents 
the fact that everyone seems to continuously make the same mistakes. 
The typical process starts at or near the completion of the project. 




-33- 



TUTORIALS 



Someone on the team gathers information on 
what happened over the past i8 months or so. 
Why is it done? Seemingly to not repeat the 
same mistakes in the next game. However, a 
review of postmortems on Gamasutra.com 
reveals the same or similar mistakes are made 
over and over again. Why? What is the point? 
The recommendation? Change the process. Get 
rid of postmortems entirely. It's time to consider 
Critical Stage Analysis or CSA. The CSA process 
provides a quick, relatively painless process to 
find out what went right, what went wrong, 
what needs to be done to fix it, who will do it 
and by when. CSA was introduced at GDC 2003 
and this is the workshop version. 

Takeaway: A full understanding of the CSA 
process and the management skills required to 
implement it. 

Intended Audience: Producers, project 
managers, team leads, senior executives or 
anyone moving in that direction. Prerequisites 
for attendees is to have shipped or are shipping 
at least one title. 

► (337) • Advanced Visual Effects with 

Direct3D 

Sim Dietrich, David Gosselin, Jeff Grills, Shawn 

Hargreaves, Richard Huddy, Jason Mitchell, 

Gary McTaggart, Ashu Rege, Matthias Wloka 

See pages 117-141 for bios 

ioam-6pm ■ A3, Convention Center 

Brought to you with the collaboration of the 
industry's leading hardware and software 
vendors, this day-long tutorial provides an in- 
depth look at the Direct3D technologies in 
DirectX 9 and how they can be applied to 
cutting-edge game graphics. After a review of 
the latest API improvements and shader models, 
a variety of special effects which illustrate their 
use in game content is discussed and 
demonstrated. This includes detailed presen- 
tations from ATI and Nvidia's demo teams as 
well as top game developers who ship real 
games into the marketplace. In addition to 
illustrating the details of rendering advanced 
real-time visual effects, this tutorial covers a 
series of vendor-neutral optimizations that 
developers need to keep in mind when 
designing their engines and shaders. 

Takeaway: Attendees gain greater insights into 
advanced utilization of the DirectX 9 graphics 
APIs as used in popular shipping titles. 

Intended Audience: The intended audience for 
this session is graphics programmers who are 
actively developing a DirectX 9 application. 



► (338) • Essential Math for Game 
Programmers 

Lars Bishop & Jim Van Verth 

See pages n8 & 139 for bios 
ioam-6pm • J2, Convention Center 

Anyone who has visited his or her local mall 
lately should know that the majority of today's 
games are done in 3D. Programming for these 
games requires a higher level of math 
background, not only to do graphics but also for 
such "new growth" areas as simulation and Al. 
This tutorial provides a toolbox of techniques 
for programmers interested in improving their 
3D background, with references and links for 
those looking for more information. The focus 
of the course is to follow the rendering and 
dynamics pipelines and show how problems 
along the way can be solved and optimized 
using 3D mathematical concepts. Topics 
include numerical techniques, affine transfor- 
mations and model manipulation, introduction 
to scene graphs, camera tracking, projective 
transformations, basic rasterization and 
texturing, curves and interpolation, 
quaternions, collision detection and picking, 
basic simulation and collision response. Sample 
code libraries and examples are provided. 

Takeaway: After taking this tutorial, attendees 
should have a core background in the 
mathematics necessary for graphics and 
simulation, so that they can contribute 
constructively towards development of a game 
in a 3D environment. 

Intended Audience: This tutorial is primarily for 
those who wish to improve their math abilities 
or fill some holes in their background. Freshman 
calculus and an understanding of vectors and 
matrices is expected. 

► (341) • Web-Based 3D Gaming 
Wyeth Ridgway, Gary Rosenzweig, Doug 
Twilleager, Jules Urbach 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
ioam-6pm • Bi, Convention Center 

Web games have graduated from clones of 80s 
favorites to more hard-core 3D games. A variety 
of technologies extend browsers to allow 
developers to quickly and cheaply create 3D 
games that almost anyone with an Internet 
connection can play. This tutorials review 
technologies like Shockwave 3D, Groove3D, Wild 
Tangent and others. Their strengths and 
weaknesses are examined and examples shown. 
Part of the day shows an example of a 3D game 
built in Shockwave 3D, made with Macromedia 
Director. Code is shown and shared. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn which 3D 
technology is best for them. They see what it 



takes to make a web-based 3D game. They get 
an idea of where web-based games are headed. 

Intended Audience: Prerequisite knowledge is 
not required. Shockwave coders get more from 
the example code, but all gain a knowledge of 
3D web technologies that help them make 
decisions and initiate projects. 

► (346) • Human Resources Forum: Trends 
and Directions 

Eleanor Clarke, Mike Dornbrook, Hank Howie, 
John Malenic, Clarinda Merripen, Steve 
Martin, Leah Rubin See pages 117-141 for bios 
ioam-6pm • A7, Convention Center 

Between 75-90% of all incurred development 
expenses go towards the compensation and 
benefits of the artists, designers, programmers 
and administrators that create games. The 
management of human capital should be 
paramount in the business strategy of 
developers, yet human resources and a 
comprehensive people strategy are often only 
addressed when problems arise. 

The world of human resources is rapidly 
changing. No longer can it be handled by the 
secretary at the front desk who is "good with 
people." A good HR department or person, for 
that matter, needs to be a true business 
partner: aware of the impact on the bottom 
line and empowered to achieve the desired 
ends. As just one example, the first two weeks 
of orientation can heavily determine the 
productivity of a new employee over his or her 
next year of employment. Increasing the 
depth of that orientation can more rapidly 
increase productivity, thus directly increasing 
performance within a short amount of time. 
Another example is recruitment. Even a "low- 
level" bad hire can cost a company hundreds 
of thousands of dollars lost in time, legal 
issues, severance and lost knowledge. 

Developers are finally beginning to 
understand the link between quality of life 
issues and their relation to the bottom line. 
As the industry grows up, many developers are 
struggling with work-life balance issues such 
as overtime, elder care, and family needs. The 
stereotype of an 'ideal' programmer who 
works 90 hours a week and sleeps under her 
or his desk is being replaced with the more 
reality-based image of an under-performing 
programmer whose work habits create lots of 
buggy code, who can be difficult to deal with 
and may just end up leaving after a year. 

In response, the IGDA, in conjunction with the 
GDC, is taking a day to focus on Human 
Resources in the game industry. We focus on 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



-34- 



www.gd 



conf.com 



TUTORIALS 



defining the needs of the industry, looking at areas for improvement and 
studying and integrating business with HR. 

*■ (350) • The Art of Modeling and Animating Triple A Titles in Maya 
Frank Delise, Rustle Hill, Chris Kniffen, Dr. Paul Kruszewski, Morris 
Olmstead, Matt Ontiveros, Wade Schin See pages 777-747 for bios 
ioam-6pm • B2, Convention Center 

Hit games now demand a much broader range of animation, all of it hero- 
character quality. Hits require more geometry, and that means larger levels 
and far more objects. So, when the art assets are exported to the engine, 
animation sequences, levels and level objects run smoothly at 60 frames 
per second without stuttering or popping. With the help of Maya experts 
from game developers and Alias you learn proven approaches for creating 
award-winning results. 

Takeaway: An understanding of the key animation tools in Maya for 
creating and mixing clips and editing mocap. An understanding of the 
latest techniques for building large levels and pre-baking lighting for 
them. New tools for artists to generate hardware shaders are also 
explored. An understanding of how leading game developers are applying 
these tools and workflows to create industry leading animation and levels. 

Intended Audience: 3D artists, who use Maya daily, or are considering it, 
who want to tap the full power of Maya for creating game art. 

ONE DAY TUTORIALS 
TUESDAY, MARCH 23 

► (359) • Do-it-Yourself Usability: A Crash Course on User-Testing 
Mark Burdick, John Davis, Tom Lorusso, Marcos Nunes-Ueno, Randy 
Pagulayan, Eric Shuh 

See pages ug & 732 for bios 
ioam-6pm • A2, Convention Center 

What helped make the aiming model in Halo work so well? How did the 
Dungeon Siege team solve many 3D camera issues? What helped make the 
mouse-flight controls in Freelancer fun and easy to use (despite the conster- 
nation of many joystick jockeys)? These products used usability testing to 
help solve these (and many other) design issues. User-testing has long been 
used by other industries. Producers of products as disparate as automobiles, 
home appliances, consumer electronics, productivity software and web 
design have all used user-testing to improve their products and outperform 
their competitors. Traditionally, products in these industries have needed to 
become easier to use as their markets grew from groups of hard-core profes- 
sionals and enthusiasts to wider audiences of less technically savvy and 
more casual users. Until recently, few game developers have incorporated 
systematic user-testing feedback into the development cycle. As the game 
industry continues to mature and reach wider audiences, ease of use will 
become another important differentiator consumers will demand when 
choosing between competing products. And members of the game industry, 
quick to capitalize on any competitive advantage, are beginning to take note; 
numerous attendees at last year's Making Games More Fun: Methods for 
Play-Testing Games, taught by Bill Fulton and Michael Medlock, requested a 
tutorial on usability testing. The Games User-testing Group heard their 
pleas and now present a crash course on usability testing methods 
employed by Microsoft Game Studios. 

This tutorial covers all major aspects of a technique used by usability profes- 
sionals: the usability test. All major steps involved in conducting usability 
tests are covered, including designing and setting up usability tests, running 
participants, analyzing data, and reporting results. 



Attendees learn how to adapt professional usability techniques to run quick 
and effective usability tests that produce reliable and actionable results. 
Presenters use a combination of presentations, illustrative examples from 
the game industry, hands-on exercises and small-group activities to teach 
attendees how to use usability tests to improve their games. For more 
information about the Games User-testing Group at Microsoft Game 
Studios, please refer to www.microsoft.com/playtest/publications. 

Takeaway: In this tutorial, attendees learn how to conduct a usability test 
from start to finish. Attendees learn what a usability test is, how to design 
and set-up a usability test, how to set up a usability "lab", how to recruit and 
run participants, how to gather useful data and analyze the data, and how to 
report findings from the usability test to the rest of the team. 

Intended Audience: This tutorial is intended for those who are interested 
in learning how to use systematic user feedback to improve their game. 

► (332) • MULTIPLAYER PLAY: DESIGNING SOCIAL INTERACTION IN GAMES 

Greg Costikyan, Katie Salen, Kira Snyder, Eric Zimmerman 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
ioam-6pm • Salon III, Marriott 

Ever wondered how to create experiences of rich social interaction for your 
players? If so, this workshop gives you the opportunity to learn specific 
design strategies and approaches to meta-game and social play design. 
Through hands-on game design exercises, group discussion, analysis and 
critique, participants are immersed in discovering how games can utilize 
and extend social interaction between players to make better games and 
build more dynamic play communities. 

The intensive day-long workshop covers material on designing for the 
meta-game and principles of social play, including community-building 
tools, forbidden play and pleasure, player roles, rule-manipulation, and 
socially emergent outcomes. Participants play and discuss both digital and 
non-digital games, hear presentations by noted game designers, including 
wireless games guru Greg Costikyan and There. corn's Kira Snyder, and 
participate in group game design exercises. Participants also design a 
game to be played by all workshop attendees and have the chance to 
implement this game on a conference-wide scale. 

Takeaway: Participants learn how to design for the meta-game, increasing 
social play in their games and building strong player communities as a 
result. Play testing and iteration are used during the workshop as an 
approach to understanding emergent social interaction, and game design 
principles from designing rules to core mechanics to player roles are 
explored. 

Intended Audience: This tutorial presents game design tools, processes, 
and techniques and is geared toward game designers and development 
teams, including producers, content creators, writers, interaction 
designers, etc. 

*■ (334) • Casual Games Summit 

Brad Edelman, Scott Kim, Jennifer MacLean, Steve Meretzky, Patricia 

Pizer, Kent Quirk, Dave Rohrl, Dan Scherlis, Stephan Smith, 

John Welch See pages 117-141 for bios 

ioam-6pm • Bi, Convention Center 

Casual games, those five minute games you play for a quick break and end 
up spending two hours with, get only a tiny share of the attention at the 
Conference, but they actually represent the vast majority of game play 
that occurs around the country and the globe. The Casual Games Summit 
is a comprehensive look at all things casual games-related, focusing on 
design issues but also covering production, business and technical issues 



-35- 



TUTORIALS 



of interest to a general audience. The 
differences between casual game and core 
game design are examined, including an 
analysis of the casual game audience. This 
tutorial covers the entire casual games space, 
retail, web and mobile, with guests from many 
different channels and disciplines, and includes 
copious demos of games from every casual 
game genre. 

Takeaway: That casual games are the way to 
reach a mass audience. The rules for casual 
game design, illustrated by demos of real 
examples from games. Analysis of the casual 
games audience, including age, gender and 
cultural issues (since casual games appeal to a 
much wider age range than core games, since 
they appeal to women in far greater 
percentages than core games, and because they 
are far easier to internationalize than core 
games). The casual games space is a vibrant 
area of game development, with numerous 
successful revenue channels and opportunities 
for entry by individuals and small companies 
that the core game space largely precludes. 

► (335) • Developing a Massively 
multiplayer game 

Raph Koster, Rich Vogel, Gordon Walton 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
ioam-6pm • Ji, Convention Center 

Every year the bar keeps rising on persistent 
online games. These games cost more to 
develop, take longer to make and have team 
sizes approaching a 100 people. How can you 
midigate your risks upfront? What type of 
team do you need to hire? How do you 
efficiently manage a large team? What design 
decisions do you need to make in order to 
reduce backend costs? These are just a few of 
the topics we are going over in the tutorial. In 
general this tutorial provides an overview of the 
production process for persistent world games, 
covering lessons learned from Ultima Online, 
Everquest, and Star Wars Galaxies. 

Takeaway: The takeaway for this lecture are 
concrete, specific methods used to tackle 
various problems in massively multiplayer 
production; a better understanding of the 
implications of various production choices in 
online development; a sense of what type of 
team needs to be formed to build a MMOG; 
how is it different from single player game 
production and design considerations. 

Intended Audience: This is an intermediate 
tutorial intended for designers and producers of 
online worlds. 

► (340) • Advanced OpenGL Tutorial 

Cass Everitt, Simon Green, Mark Harris, Evan 
Hart, Bill Licea-Kane, Rob Mace, John Spitzer 



See pages nj-141 for bios 
ioam-6pm • J2, Convention Center 

OpenGL continues to be the leading API for 
cross-platform 3D graphics applications. New 
core functionality and extensions aim to keep 
OpenGL at the bleeding edge of hardware 
functionality, while at the same time providing 
a stable development platform. Brought to you 
with the collaboration of the industry's leading 
graphics hardware vendors, this day-long 
tutorial provides an advanced look at the latest 
technologies in OpenGL, and how to use these 
technologies to make your games run faster 
and look better. 

Takeaway: Attendees takeaway how to use the 
latest features of OpenGL using the shading 
language to improve the look and performance 
of your games and art tools. 

► (342) • Test Automation in Game 

Development 

John Bartkiw, Jennifer Boespflug, Jonathan 

Burns, David Eichorn, Sean P. Jenkin 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
ioam-6pm • Salon I & II, Marriott 

In the past, there has been a difference 
between automation levels in application 
software testing and game testing. QA/Test in 
application development has had automated 
testing for many years because of large project 
scopes. Game testers on the other hand have 
only recently seen the size and scope of games 
increase. There is also a difference between the 
purposes of these two areas of software: 
productivity and fun! Can automation make a 
game fun? No, but it can make the game more 
stable, confirm features work as expected and 
provide testing for the millions of combinations 
in an RTS/RPG/Fighting/ (insert genre here) 
game. All of this can free up team resources to 
either save money or spend more time on fun 
game balancing. This tutorial introduces the 
theory of automation, the benefits of 
automation and demonstrates that there are 
several types of automation that all projects 
can implement to save production time and 
money. Learn what it takes to build an end-to- 
end automation system and the problems that 
can be encountered. Find out about automating 
build and BVT processes, getting useful data 
from your automation testing and how to 
present those results effectively to your teams. 
Learn multiple techniques for interacting with a 
game including internal and external scripting 
systems, in-game hooks and the Xbox debug 
channel library for Xbox titles. Leave knowing 
how to establish a strategic, optimal, phased 
plan of attack for automation integration. The 
tutorial is presented by Microsoft Game Studios 
Software Design Engineers in Test and is 



supplemented by automation demos 
implemented in recent MGS titles. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave this presentation 
with a fundamental understanding of why, 
what, when and how to automate the testing 
of games. They understand that there are 
several types of in-game automation that are 
simple to implement and save most projects 
production time and money. Finally they can 
intelligently design an optimal automation plan 
of attack that best takes advantage of their 
circumstances. 

Intended Audience: The intended audience for 
this tutorial includes producers, game 
developers, QA testers and tool developers for 
all gaming platforms, including PC, Xbox, 
PlayStation and Gamecube. There are no pre- 
requisites for this tutorial as it covers theory, 
design, implementation and deployment of 
game automation. 

► (343) • Professional Java Game 
Development Techniques 
Dustin Clingman, Shawn Kendall, 
Syrus Mesdaghi 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
ioam-6pm • Salon IV, Marriott 

This tutorial is an introduction to the newly 
release Gaming APIs from Sun Microsystems. 
Topics include 3D Graphics, High performance 
audio as well as a number of critical techniques 
relating to performance and platform compati- 
bility. 

Takeaway: The key takeaway from this session 
are a strong foundation in the new core 
Gaming APIs as well as an understanding of the 
challenges and benefits of utilizing Java in 
existing and future development cycles. 

Intended Audience: The core audience for this 
tutorial are experienced Java programmers or 
those looking to use Jave in current of future 
projects. Prerequisite knowledge in Java is 
preferred. 

► (344) • Creativity in Creature and 
Character Design 

Donald Seegmiller See page 136 for bio 
ioam-6pm • B2, Convention Center 

Come and spend a day learning about creativity 
and how to apply it to create compelling 
creature and character designs. Feeling like the 
most creative thing you do during the day is get 
out of bed? This day long tutorial is the answer 
to get you up and out of your creative rut. In 
the beginning of the tutorial, it's concentrated 
on giving you the necessary tools to jump start 
creativity through a series of exercises that you 



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www.gdconf.com 



* 



TUTORIALS 



can use each and everyday. Some of the suggestions are cerebral in nature 
and some are hands-on, where you, the artist, will be drawing, so bring 
your art materials. After you have spent half the day learning to be 
creative, we jump in and put what you have learned into practice. A 
number of different drawing exercises designed to solve specific creature 
and character design issues will be tackled. Never fear, if your drawing skills 
are rusty. Much of the afternoon is also about improving your drawing 
skills. Also, in the afternoon, examples of creating, drawing and painting on 
the computer are demonstrated using a variety of programs. A brief 
discussion of different applications that can be used are presented. All in all 
a day of learning, creating and drawing for anyone that wants to have that 
magic needed to create exciting creatures and characters. 

Takeaway: Attendees gain an increased understanding of creativity and 
how to use it; mental exercises that help increase your creativity; drawing 
exercises that you can use to increase your creative ideas; increased 
drawing and sketching skills; an increased knowledge of different computer 
applications and how they can be used in your creature creations. 

Intended Audience: This session is for artists who love to draw, want to 
improve their skill, and be more creative while doing so. The only prereq- 
uisite is a love of drawing and sketching and bringing your own materials 
to participate. Less experienced artists benefit the most. 

> (347) • Audio Boot Camp 

Peter Clare, Alastair Lindsay, Jason Page, Dave Ranyard, Brian Schmidt, 
Scott Selfon 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
ioam-6pm • Almaden, Hilton 

This tutorial attempts to explain major audio concepts in language 
suitable for composers, sound designers, programmers and game 
designers, in short, an opportunity to learn what concepts like "rolloff," 
"AD PCM," and "multi-streaming" really mean and how they are used by 
games. Topics include the audio production pipeline, basic sound 
terminology, audio resource management techniques and tradeoffs, the 
use of multichannel surround sound in games, dialog production, non- 
linear audio, and an introduction to some of the platform-specific audio 
tools. There are ample opportunities for open discussion about the current 
state of game audio, and how audio can really add value to the gaming 
experience by making them more fun, realistic and immersive. 

Takeaway: Understanding of audio terminology and concepts, as well as 
key audio production pipeline challenges. The ability to start a project 
better knowing how to define the assets needed, obstacles to overcome 
and planning required. 

Intended Audience: Composers, sound designers, audio programmers, 
game designers and producers. Presentation assumes only very broad 
prior general knowledge regarding audio. 

> (349) • 3DS Max Tutorial 

See addendum for more information. 

ioam-6pm • Pi, Convention Center 

> (357) • Leveraging Development Deals to Build Value in Your 
Studio 

Jim Charne, Dan O'Connell Offner, Frank Pape, David S Rosenbaum, 
Steve Salyer, Robert Walsh 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
ioam-6pm • A8, Convention Center 



Some studios go job to job and never get anything more than a paycheck. 
Others find ways to build value that can lead to acquisition, outside 
investment and, at the end of the day, personal wealth, for the principals 
and senior staff. Industry lawyers and senior executives explore today's 
development deal marketplace to identify ways in which development 
studios can build value. 

This tutorial reviews business models for both developers and publishers, 
discusses the nature and details of development agreements and focuses 
in on those areas that give developers the best opportunity to grow their 
businesses. 

The program closes with a mock negotiation between a developer and 
publisher with discussion on strategies to retain or control rights that can 
help a developer grow. 

Takeaway: Understanding the nature and details of development deals, 
and identifying areas the developer can leverage to build value, is the first 
step to building a company with enduring value. 

Intended Audience: Developer executives and senior staff who have an 
interest in building new companies. 

> (444) • World Building in Maya 
sponsored tutorial 

Whitney Batestilli, Jeremy Gordon, Roland Reyer, Joe Stinchcomb, 
Ouoc Tran See pages 117-141 for bios 
ioam-6pm • A7, Convention Center 

In this Tutorial, you learn the experts' tips and tricks for exploiting Maya's 
"graphic OS" to create powerful world building tools. During the day, Maya 
MEL and API experts from Alias and key game developers show ways to 
create artist-friendly Blind Data and Dynamic Attribute managers, how to 
create an exporter/importer suited to the needs of your workflow and 
how to create and tweak hardware shaders. 

Takeaway: Attendees takeaway an understanding of the approach and 
benefits of tight integration of Maya into the pipeline. Examples of some 
of the most commonly needed, yet most powerful plugins are presented. 

Intended Audience: Tools team programmers who are currently using 
Maya or those who want to understand what Maya's API can do, and the 
best methods to extract maximum performance from it. 

► (446) • Microsoft Windows DirectX Developer Day Sponsored 
Tutorial 

Dave Aronson, Dan Baker, Kev Gee, Andy Glaister, Skip Mcilvaine, Craig 
Peeper 

ioam-6pm • A3/4, Convention Center 

Discover how to get the most from Windows and DirectX 9 at the 
Microsoft Windows DirectX Developer Day, Tuesday, March 23 at GDC 
2004! Two tracks, Advanced Developer and Production, feature presen- 
tations by Andy Glaister, Kev Gee, Craig Peeper, Dan Baker, Skip Mcilvaine, 
Dave Aronson and more! Register now and learn: 

- What's in the next DirectX SDK Update 

- Debugging and performance tools for DirectX 

- Precomputed Radiance Transfer for both devs and artists 

- New shader model support for HLSL 

- Tips and tricks of D3DX 

- Production toolsets for artists and sound designers 

- The future of DirectX technologies 



L^g, Sony Ericsson 



and 



metrowerks 



Enabling Evolutionary 

Game Development 



Whether you design games for console, portable or mobile devices, Sony Ericsson 
and Metrowerks M have the tools, support, technology and devices to help you build 
your games better, smarter and faster than your competition. 



Sony Ericsson mini-theatre presentations 

Evolutionary Game Development for 
Sony Ericsson Phones 

Evolution is all about change, and developers need to be 
aware of the effect that change will have in terms of 
development cycles, skill sets and focus. Sony Ericsson 
will explain how to take advantage of these changes and 
move to the next stage of mobile game development. 

Enhancing the Game-Playing 
Experience with J2ME ™ MIDP 2.0 

The new Java MIDP 2.0 profile pushes the boundaries of 
mobile gaming. Sony Ericsson will explain how to 
enhance the game-playing experience for the consumer, 
and optimize mobile gaming using new technological 
advances in phone features and new programming 
options. As a professional developer, you can't afford to 
miss out. 




Taking Games to the Next Level 
with Java® 3D 

This candid presentation will highlight Sony Ericsson's 
view of this market's potential, the advantages and 
hurdles all developers will encounter while creating 
mobile 3D applications. A technical overview of the 
Java 3D engine will also be included. 

Wireless Multi-Player Gaming 

Can multi-player gaming on mobile devices really be 
compared with multi-player gaming on PC's and 
consoles? Find out Sony Ericsson's view and some 
operator feedback on what business models work in 
this challenging market. 



Sony Ericsson Demos: 

• Powerful Symbian OS™ Smartphones 

• Latest Java phones with MIDP 2.0 support 

• On-device Debugging for C++ and J2MF" 
applications 

• Tech Support Live! 

• Sony Ericsson Developer World & DevShop 



Come by the booth (#628) to check out 
our show specials and see the latest 
Sony Ericsson phones. 



METROWERKS, the METROWERKS logo, and CODEWARRIOR are trademarks or registered trademarks of Metrowerks Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries. 
Sony Ericsson is the trademark or registered trademark of Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications AB. All other trade names and trademarks are the property of their 
respective owners. © 2004 Metrowerks Corporation. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 



metrowerks 



and 



La Sony Ericsson 



Enabling Evolutionary 

Game Development 



Whether you design games for console, portable or mobile devices, Metrowerks ™ 
and Sony Ericsson have the tools, support, technology and devices to help you 
build your games better, smarter and faster than your competition. 



Metrowerks mini-theatre presentations 

Overview of CodeWarrior™ Game 
Development Technology 

Metrowerks offers the broadest suite of development 
options for Sony'" and Nintendo" platforms and wireless 
devices, including partnerships with leading middleware 
providers. Come get an overview of Metrowerks 
game development technology and our expanded 
service offering. 

Improving Sony Ericsson P900 Game 
Performance with Metrowerks Tools 

Finding and isolating performance bottlenecks and 
debugging source code directly on the device are must- 
haves for mobile game developers. Metrowerks will 
explain how CodeWarrior and CodeTEST technology can 
be used to tweak and optimize mobile games for the 
Sony Ericsson P900 mobile device. 




Tuning Your Console Game for 
Greater Performance 

Uncover bottlenecks in your console game code in seconds 
rather than weeks! Metrowerks will address common 
post-compilation issues, discuss how available profiling 
tools can alleviate common problems, and present general 
post-code compilation profiling strategies. 

Optimizing Your PlayStation®2 Game 
with CodeWarrior Technology 

Find out how to make revisions to online titles quickly and 
easily using the new file format from Sony (.ERX). This 
discussion will also cover our Zero Intrusion Profiler tech- 
nology for the Sony Performance Analyzer - the best way 
to see detailed and exact profiling of your application. 



Metrowerks Demos: 

• CodeWarrior game development tools for 
Sony® platforms 

• CodeWarrior game development tools for 
NINTENDO® platforms 

• CodeWarrior tools for Symbian OS™ and 
Next Generation Platform 



Come by the booth (#628) to check out 
our latest technology offerings. 



METROWERKS. the METROWERKS logo, and CODEWARRIOR are trademarks or registered trademarks of Metrowerks Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries. 
Sony Ericsson is the trademark or registered trademark of Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications AB. All other trade names and trademarks are the property of their 
respective owners. © 2004 Metrowerks Corporation. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 







-37- 





GDC MOBILE 



i GameDevelopers 

i Conference Mobile 



Explosive growth of mobile users, short production cycles, and the variety of distribution channels mean the mobile game sector 
offers major opportunity for both profit and innovation to all game developers. This market needs the creative input from game 
developers to maintain its momentum. However, as devices become more sophisticated, costs and risks increase. Only at GDC Mobile 
do leaders from the mobile communications industry meet with the world's best game developers. Network operators, content 
aggregators, technology & infrastructure providers and leading game developers together determine the future of mobile game 
development and develop effective content strategies to engage billions of consumers worldwide. 



THURSDAY, MARCH 25, 2004 
REGENCY BALLROOM, FAIRMONT 

► Morning Focus: The World of 
Mobile Games 

9 - 9:15am 

Opening Comments from Conference 

Chairman 

Robert Tercek, (M)FORMA Croup, Chairman 

CDC Mobile 

9:15 - 10:30am 

Mobile Games in the Asia-Pacific Region 
Speakers: Vishal Condal, IndiaCames (India), 
Kyu. C Lee, GameVil (Korea), Stefan Rust, Sun 
Microsystems (Hong Kong/China) 

Since the advent of games on mobile phones in 
the late 1990s, the Asian region has consistently 
set the pace. Many unique factors combine to 
spur breakthrough game design in this vibrant 
region: the world's most advanced mobile 
networks; rapid innovation in mobile terminals; 
specialized software environments optimized 
for games; rewarding business models; innova- 
tive marketing; and most importantly, a huge 
and growing audience of consumers who 
demand ever-better game play. 

Despite these advances, most mobile game 
developers outside of Asia rarely have an oppor- 
tunity to experience first-hand the advances in 
the leading market. So this year, GDC Mobile 
has assembled a unique panel of speakers who 
will provide a comprehensive overview of the 
burgeoning Asian markets, including China, 
Korea, and India. 

Each presentation consists of an overview of 
the regional game scene, including demograph- 



ics and local taste in gameplay, plus demonstra- 
tions of the best that local game developers 
have to offer. Plus these speakers will tell you 
what it takes to carve a deal with mobile opera- 
tors in the region. 

10:30 - 11:30am - Civic Auditorium 

General Interest Keynote: Encouraging 

Innovation in Game Development 

Andy House, Sony Computer Entertainment 

America 

11:30am - 12:30pm 
World Tour of Mobile Games 
Speakers: Matthew Bellows, Publisher of 
Wireless Gaming Review (USA), David "DC" 
Collier, Namco (Japan) 

Mobile games are a global phenomenon, but 
unless you are globetrotter, it's impossible to 
see them all. GDC brings the best of the world's 
games to you. Don't miss this exclusive session 
that provides a whirlwind tour of games devel- 
oped for mobile subscribers from every region 
of the world. Matthew Bellows and DC provide 
examples of the most successful mobile games 
on the planet, as well as a glimpse of some of 
the most innovative new game concepts. This 
session places special emphasis on identifying 
the universal principals of mobile game design. 

12:45 - 1:45pm 

Building Games for Mobile Devices: the 

Market, the Platforms, and the Sales 

Opportunity 

Speaker: Chris Lovejoy 

Nokia is investing significant resources into 
developing platforms, tools, and sales support 
programs to help developers get new games 



Platinum Sponsor: 

IMOKIA 

Cold Sponsor: 


I!II1M!U.!:»M.!!I 

Silver Sponsors: 
^^ mm ^ 

pabhammer 

TRADE u &|gf$ intellect 
palmsource 

swerve 

Media Sponsors: 

IHiihileMerlriiniTipnt V%^V% 

rnrnrTHi ROmar 
Wireless 

on. Mobile 

E n te t-ta in me nc 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



-38- 



www.gdconf.com 



GDC MOBILE 



to market. In this presentation, we'll brief you on our offering for game 
developers including Nokia's developer platforms, the N-Cage mobile 
game deck, and how to take your game to market. 

2 - 3pm 

Big Came Hunting: Console Came Publishers Join the Mobile Fray 
Moderator: Stuart O'Brien, Mobile Games Analyst 
Speakers: Jon Estanislao, Activision, John Greiner, Hudson Soft (Japan), 
Simon Protheroe, Eidos 

Even American game publishers have finally discovered what their 
Japanese and European rivals realized years ago: mobile games are the 
fastest-growing segment of the game software industry. With The 
Economist projecting that 1/3 of all game software sold in 2006 will be on 
mobile phones, the traditional console game publishers can no longer 
afford to sit on the sidelines. This panel session includes representatives 
from some of the first companies to enter this field, as well as some 
console game companies who are new to mobile. What conditions must 
be satisfied before a console game publisher will enter the mobile market? 
Does mobile present a new opportunity or just a repeat of the online 
experiment? How appealing is the prospect of dealing with mobile opera- 
tors? OTA or MMC? Brand extension or new titles? How tightly does the 
mobile audience mesh with the core game audience? 

3:15 - 4pm 

The Network is the Game: Social Trends in Mobile Entertainment 

Speaker: Amy Jo Kim, SocialDesigner.Net 

Cell phones and game machines are on a collision course. Our industry 
knows how to create entertainment for game consoles, but what happens 
when the game console is a near-ubiquitous, inherently social device that 
transcends class and gender boundaries? What kind of mobile entertain- 
ment experiences will be compelling and addictive for people who are 
growing up with cell phones, and are using these devices for texting, 
picture-sharing, downloading, and talking, as well as gaming? 

To create great mobile games for this audience, we need to understand 
how they use cell phones, and what role 'mobile relationships' play in their 
lives. In this short talk, online community expert Amy Jo Kim provides 
attendees an overview of the most recent ethnographic research into 
mobile usage patterns and emergent social phenomena, and demonstrate 
how fast-growing mobile services like UPOC and ImaHima are riding this 
wave by helping phone users maintain and grow their social networks. 
This session concludes with a summary of the key social trends that are 
important for mobile game developers to pay attention to. 

4 - 6pm 

Mobile Keynote 

Speaker: Howard Handler, Virgin Mobile (USA) 

6 - 8pm 

Kayak Interactive Sponsors The First Ever Mobile Multiplayer Pub 

Pool Tournament 

Open only to mobile pass holders. 

Competition will be ferocious as developers, publishers, carrier executives 
and the media battle each other to be named the "King of the Table" in 
Kayak Interactive's Pub Pool Tournament. Watch the live action on big 
screens, enjoy free food and drink. 



FRIDAY, MARCH 26, 2004 
REGENCY BALLROOM, FAIRMONT 

► Morning Focus: The Evolving Mobile Platform 

9 - 9:15am 

Chairman's Opening Remarks 

Speaker: Robert Tercek, Chairman GDC Mobile 

9:15 - 10:15am 

Featured Presentation: 

The Princes and the Pipeline: Mobile Games Market in 2004 

Speaker: Paul Palmieri, Verizon Wireless 

The wireless marketplace for games although new, reached a point of vali- 
dated consumer demand in 2003. This exciting market continues to 
change and grow as it looks to find its real inflection point in 2004. 
Changes are occurring daily, as the giant of game friendly handsets contin- 
ues to march through mobile subscriber bases worldwide. 

Once underdog platforms like BREW are showing bright hope as sales 
numbers roll in. Java handset shipments are on the rise, with immersive 
service experiences like Get It Now and Vodafone Live!. Showing that deliv- 
ering the overall ROI for mobile game development has everything to do 
with scale, and a superior customer experience. 

Using Get It Now and Vodafone Live! as a backdrop, attendees get a first- 
hand view of how the world's leading mobile operators approach the 
games business and the mobile data business as a whole. Part of the 
review will focus on emerging technology, and the criticality of striking the 
balance between driving scale today, and stewarding and securing the 
pipeline for 2004 and beyond. A frank assessment of the value chain and 
where handset manufacturers sit is a key topic. 

10:30 -11:30am 

Smackdown: Making Sense of Competing Mobile Platforms 

Moderator: Seamus McAteer, Zelos Group (USA) 

Speakers: Greg Costikyan, Unplugged Games (USA), Misha Lyalin, 

Reaxion (USA & Russia), Adrian Sack, IdeaWorks 3D (UK) 

The mobile terminal is in the process of an incredible transformation in 
response to global demand for new services and new features. To meet 
this demand, leading technology companies have introduced application 
development environments and reference designs for advanced mobile 
terminals which allow for extensibility via downloaded software. The 
mobile phone has evolved into a media terminal, with color screen, power- 
ful microprocessor, more memory and more capability. But the content 
applications which take advantage of these hardware features are largely 
dependent upon capabilities designed by just four companies. What's next 
for developers caught in the crossfire of strategic agendas of software 
behemoths? This panel discussion brings together representatives from 
the companies who exert the most leverage on the shape of mobile 
gaming. Attendees learn about new developments and device capabilities; 
what's next for multimedia and multiplayer games; and the battle for the 
standards and control; and the role of collaboration among industry lead- 
ers to create a common, open platform. 




-39- 



GDC MOBILE 



11:30am - 12:30pm 

The Future of Rendering: A Mobile 

Perspective. 

Speaker: Dr. Mark Ollila, MTGP.Telcogames, 

SICGRAPH (Sweden) 

This talk covers the trends in computer graphics 
and its convergence towards the mobile device. 
In particular, we examine the latest develop- 
ments in Mobile 3D games, and the various 3D 
API's available for the game developer. Currently 
there include several standardization initiatives, 
such as OpenGL E5 and Mobile 3D API for Java 
(M3G). There also include proprietary standards 
that also provide the game developer with 
enhanced graphics abilities, such as Mophun 
3D, Gizmo3D, FatHammer, Criterion Renderware 
for Mobile to name a few. How these standards 
compare to traditional console and workstation 
APIs are discussed, and why certain features 
were added or removed and how these are 
been used in the marketplace today. The talk 
closes with a look at the latest development 
and rollout efforts in the community towards 
3D on a mobile device. 

12:45 - 1:45pm 

UK Mobile Games: Past, Present, and Future 

Opportunities 

UK Trade & Investment (in partnership with the 
UK trade association Intellect) is pleased to 
sponsor a GDC Mobile luncheon panel discus- 
sion on Friday, March 26th, from 12:45 -1:45pm 
Please join us to hear a variety of perspectives 
and insights on the UK games industry from 
talented and experienced players in the field. 

2 - 3pm 

Game Design Case Studies: 
Made-for-the-Medium Original Titles 
Moderator: Dan Scherlis, Etherplay (USA) 
Speakers: Glenn Broadway, IOMO (UK), Sami 
Lahtinen, Mr. Goodliving (Finland), Lasse 
Seppanen, Sumea (Finland) 

Quality cutting-edge titles, designed with 
consideration for the medium and produced 
with skill and expertise, sit side-by-side on WAP 
menus with lackluster, poorly produced games. 
And they all sell for the same price. Mobile 
gaming is in the process of shedding an image 
of retro arcade games and maturing into a 
medium with unique attributes. A new genera- 
tion of game developers have maximized these 
unique aspects of mobility to create original 
titles of surprising wit and quality. Our panel of 
expert developer's present case studies of the 
design process, including how they work 
around technical limitations and budget issues 
in order to squeeze every last drop of perform- 



ance out of a constrained platform. Find out 
how they developed some of these new medi- 
ums original game franchises. 

3:15 - 3:45pm 

Multiplayer Games for Mobile Networks: 

A Distributed Computing Approach 

and Case Study 

Speaker: Dr. Aleta Ricciardi, Kayak Interactive 

(USA) 

Delivering interactive multiplayer games over 
mobile networks has inherent challenges that, 
if not handled properly, result in dissatisfying 
and even unfair game play. Moreover, solving 
these problems for mobile networks and 
devices requires a fundamentally different 
approach than seen in on-line play. This talk 
discusses the problems that mobile game 
developers are confronted with, architectures 
and programming solutions for these problems, 
and presents a case study of the evolution of a 
single-player game to a full-featured multi- 
player game. 

4 - 6pm 

Mobile Operator Roundup 

Moderator: Robert Tercek, Chairman GDC 

Mobile 

Speakers: Jason Ford, Sprint PCS (USA), Richard 

Segwick, 02 (UK), Dan Silberberger, Nextel 

(USA), Scott Trichon, Verizon Wireless (USA) 

Mobile network operators discuss games in an 
extra long interactive session featuring audi- 
ence participation. This moderated discussion 
contrasts consumer demand and the evolution 
of mobile games in each region. During previ- 
ous GDC Mobile events, the Mobile Operator 
Spotlight sessions featured some of the liveliest 
Q&A sessions ever witnessed by telecom execu- 
tives. 

This particular Spotlight session focuses on 
marketing efforts by mobile operators to stimu- 
late consumer demand. Attendees learn specific 
details of carrier rollouts, including service take 
up rates and usage statistics. The world's lead- 
ing mobile operators share their plans for 
expanded mobile game services. 

Attend this session to learn the specifics of 
network deployments, new handset configura- 
tions, pricing plans and marketing milestones 
of the leading mobile operators. 




See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



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use Dolby® technology. 

Over a third of readers on IGN.com, the Internet's leading 
information destination for gamers, are playing games 
on home theater systems with Dolby Digital. 

Come by booth 928 and see how our technologies 
expand the game experience. 



www. dolbygames. com 



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Pin IDOL BY 



The Sound of Entertainment 




Get the latest information and technical support for Dolby technologies 
Read about cross-platform development, interactive mixing, and more 
Download the latest logos, splash screens, and trailers 

Demo Dolby Pro Logic® llx: 

The only true 7.1 solution for games 

Expand both stereo and 5.1-channel material to 6.1 and 7.1 channels 

Fully compatible with Dolby Pro Logic II and Dolby Digital 



www. dolbygames. com 



-41- 



AUDIO KEYNOTE 











Sound Design Methodology of Medal of Honor 

Erik Kraber 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-ii:3oam 
Almaden, Hilton 

This session uncovers the process of audio for the Medal of Honor video games from the conception, 
to the creation, through the integration. This case study covers the major points of the sound process 
and its evolution through the five years of the franchise, spanning from the original Medal of Honor 
to the latest, Medal of Honor: Rising Sun. Here is a description of some of the topics to be discussed: 

- The guiding principles of sound design for Medal of Honor 

- How to enrich a cinematic game experience with audio 

- Pre Production: Setting the tone for the final product 

- Sound Design: The Hows and why of weapons to whiz bys 

- Music: The interactively of a dynamic orchestral score 

- Ambience: The art of creating what isn't there 

- Dialogue: The importance of a well-defined communication pipeline between design, animation, and 
audio 

- The evolution of MOH audio design from PSi to PS2 to PC 

Takeaway: A better understanding of the potential, process, and pitfalls of sound design through the 
course of a video game franchise. 

Intended Audience: Sound designers, audio programmers, composers, game designers, producers who 
have a basic understanding of the audio process for video games. 

Erik Kraber 

As the Audio Director for Electronic Arts tos Angeles (EAtA), Erik Kraber established EALA's first sound 
department and currently serves as the chairman of EA's Worldwide Audio Council. Since joining EALA 
in 1998, Erik has been recognized for his achievements in sound design for Medal of Honor, Medal of 
Honor: Underground, Clive Barker's Undying, Medal of Honor: Allied Assault, and Medal of 
Honor: Frontline. He has received several awards for his work, including one GDC Award and three 
AIAS Awards for Best Sound Design of the Year in 1999,2000 and 2002. He has worked with the Saul 
Zaentz Film Center, Skywalker Sound, and other post-production studios, where he honed his craft of 
sound design, foley, dialogue, music composition for films, commercials and television. Erik embarked 
on his career in the interactive entertainment industry in 1996 when he worked with DreamWorks 
Interactive on The Eost World and Small Soldiers. 






See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



-1*2- 



www.gdconf.com 




V 



AUDIO TRACK 




Game audio makes movie soundtracks seem simple by comparison. Games routinely involve the 
scripting and editing of 40,000 lines of dialog, multiple variations of orchestral scores and sound 
effects with real-time controls. This requires a unique fusion of craft and technology, and is 
shared by musicians, sound designers, programmers and game designers. From sessions 
designed to polish the skills of a veteran composer to case studies that shed light on 
programming techniques and tools that bring those compositions to life, the Audio track 
offers real world information to take game audio to new heights. 



Panel - Intermediate 

Audio Asset Management for Large Projects 

David Chan, Jared Emerson-Johnson, Julian Kwasneski, Marc Schaefgen, 

Jacob Stephens 

See pages 777-747 for bios 
Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 
Almaden, Hilton 

This panel discusses the management of audio assets for large products 
and how to avoid common pitfalls and ensure quality results on a large 
scale. Planning methods used at BioWare and other companies are 
discussed. The evolution of these methods are also covered. The panel 
looks at project management from both internal development and 
external contractor perspectives. Questions such as, when to begin the 
planning process, who should be involved and what assets are needed 
and discussed. The differences between managing audio on small 
projects and large projects are highlighted. We also go over mistakes 
that can and should be avoided. The steps from planning to execution 
are outlined. Deciding on resource needs for the project and if external 
contracting are needed to meet deadlines. Lastly, what needs to be done 
to maintain quality on a large project? 

Takeaway: Participants learn how to make the best use of their 
resources when planning for large projects. They also learn from the 
methods and mistakes made by people that have worked on projects 
with some of the largest audio requirements of any in the games 
industry. 

Intended Audience: This panel is aimed at people that have some 
experience in planning, managing and creating audio assets for games. 
Audio creators, project producers and game designers would all benefit 
from this panel. Familiarity with audio terminology is assumed. 

Roundtable - All 

Audio Business Issues Roundtable 2004 

Rich Goldman See page 124 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 

Plaza, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 

Pacific, Hilton 

How do you negotiate a fair agreement for music and sound effects that 
satisfies both the game developer and the composer or audio 
production company? What are the potential liabilities that face the 
music producer and the game developer when music and effects are 
commissioned or licensed? What future challenges are represented by 



the web as a global distribution system, online gaming, and convergent 
television? This roundtable discusses industry approaches to 
agreements, negotiations, intellectual property, licensing, and budgeting 
both from the game developer's and audio contractor's point of view. 

Takeaway: Independent music composers, music producers, and sound 
designers, along with in-house game producers, audio producers, and 
business affairs personnel benefit from attending this session. There are 
no prerequisites attend. 

Intended Audience: Independent music and audio producers are better 
prepared to understand and negotiate terms of production agreements 
with developers and publishers after attending this roundtable. There is 
also a discussion on rights issues that often are not clear to some 
producers. In-house personnel learn how get the best performance from 
their contractors by negotiating agreements that benefit all concerned. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Audio Concepts in Plain English: 3D and I3DL2 

Scott Selfon See page 137 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

Almaden, Hilton 

With all of the advanced techniques available for sound compression 
and manipulation, the content creator often finds him or herself 
needing to learn a new acronym or concept every day. These 'plain 
english' talks attempts translate some of these tech-heavy concepts into 
accessible explanations, using terminology that artists understand. In 
this talk, we discuss how ADPCM compression works, and where its 
limitations can introduce artifacts. The talk also covers some of the 
perceptually lossless audio compression options, such as MP3 and WMA, 
and how they operate. We also discuss techniques for looping using 
sample boundary restrictions that consoles often impose. 

Intended Audience: Composers, sound designers, audio programmers 
and producers benefit from this lecture. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Audio Director to the Rescue 
Andrew Boyd See page 119 for bio 
Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 
Almaden, Hilton 

Time and again, the same complaints surface about game audio 
production: 

* Audio work begins too late in the production process 

* Audio isn't involved in the initial design 




-43- 



AUDIO TRACK 



* There is never enough time scheduled for 
audio production 

* Audio tools are inconsistent and/or 
inadequate 

* Audio pipelines are clumsy, inefficient, and 
unintuitive 

* Producers do not take audio seriously 

* Budgets are not large enough to support 
quality audio 

If only each of these problems could be solved, 
the thinking goes, we could finally make 
games with good audio without killing the 
audio team in the process! But what if each of 
these individual issues is not really a problem 
in itself? What if each is simply a symptom of 
a deeper and more systematic malaise - 
missing or ineffective audio direction? 

In this provocative presentation, Andrew Boyd 
argues that a strong, enabled and empowered 
audio director can ameliorate or obliterate 
most of the difficulties and impediments 
faced by game audio production teams. He 
demonstrates that the usual complaints are 
misguided and unproductive. Using examples 
from his own experience as audio director on 
such products as EA's Lord of the Rings: The 
Two Towers and Microsoft's Blood Wake, he 
discusses strategies to extend audio schedules 
and make better use of available time, enlarge 
audio budgets and spend available money 
more effectively, unclog audio pipelines and 
work more productively with other disciplines, 
and end up with a higher quality product. He 
describes an ideal audio director, and 
demonstrates the value this person can bring 
to every game project. And he challenges the 
industry to adopt an audio production model 
that fights the status quo, puts the authority 
in the hands of the experts, and ultimately 
benefits everyone on the project. 

Takeaway: This talk suggests that the 
common problems in game audio can be 
addressed by the correct use of an audio 
director. The right audio director is in a 
position of responsibility and authority, has 
the knowledge and acumen to manage a 
team to aggressive goals, and has the courage 
and confidence to establish a unique direction 
and see it through. The right audio director 
makes audio production more efficient and 
more effective, frees the audio team to do 
better work, and allows the other team 
leaders to focus on their own disciplines. 

Intended Audience: This discussion provides 
useful information to members of the game 
audio community, and is potentially of interest 
to every level of that community from 



beginner to expert, in-house or independent. 
However, it also specifically addresses 
producers, as well as the leadership of other 
disciplines such as art, design, and technology. 
While the topic is dear to anyone involved in 
game audio production, perhaps the presen- 
tation's greatest value resides in the novel 
perspective it offers to those in leadership 
positions outside of the discipline of audio. 

Panel - Intermediate 

Audio for Mobile Panel 

Leslie Chard, Ted Cohen, Thomas Dolby 

Robertson, Greg Richardson, Jason Schultz, 

Martin Wilde, Brian Wolkenberg 

See pages 117-141 for bios 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

Almaden, Hilton 

Mobile audio has become one of the most 
profitable and popular areas in the wireless 
arena. Crossing global boundaries and 
technologies, music, in the form of ringtone 
sales, has blossomed into a multi-billion dollar 
annual industry. Consumer interest in all 
forms of multimedia content for mobile 
devices is growing exponentially, and everyone 
has their fingers in the mobile music pie. 

You're invited to join us for what promises to 
be a lively and wide-ranging panel discussion 
among industry leaders from all areas of the 
mobile audio space. Don't miss this 
opportunity to find out what artists and 
labels, manufacturers, carriers and interactive 
game developers are thinking about. From the 
issues of securing rights, creating increased 
brand awareness, artist and consumer 
interaction and creative development, listen as 
they discuss their challenges, opportunities, 
solutions and discoveries in this burgeoning 
realm of entertainment. Come prepared with 
your questions, too. As time permits, you also 
have the opportunity to dialog with these 
experts. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Cross-Platform Audio Using Interactive XMF 
Chris Grigg, George Sanger, Martin Wilde 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
Thursday, March 25 • i:30-2:3opm 
Fi, Convention Center 

The creation and implementation of 
interactive audio elements is frequently 
frustrating and stressful. The programmers 
sometimes wind up making decisions that the 
content creators should be making, and worse, 
sometimes the content creators wind up 
(gulp) programming! Interactive XMF is an 
emerging standard that will greatly facilitate 



the creation and implementation of game 
audio. It is designed to allow all creative 
control to be put into the hands of the audio 
artists by means of an intuitive interface and 
simple scripting language. And, since this new 
file format is non-proprietary and platform 
and language agnostic, game developers 
using Interactive XMF will see a reduction in 
rework for porting to new platforms, as well 
as reductions in production time, cost and 
stress. Developed by the MIDI Manufacturers 
Association, XMF (extensible Music Format) 
defines a low-overhead, flexible container 
technology for bundling collections of data 
resources in one or more formats into a single 
file. The Interactive Audio Special Interest 
Croup is finalizing an Interactive XMF file 
format that's based on a platform- 
independent model of a software Soundtrack 
Manager, allowing much easier development 
and implementation of highly interactive 
audio. This lecture describes the Interactive 
XMF file format, its uses and its benefits to 
content creators, implementers, game engine 
architects, game programmers, and game 
producers. During the discussion period 
attendees are encouraged to comment on the 
specification and make recommendations. 

Takeaway: Attendees gain an understanding 
of the structure and uses of Interactive XMF 
files and how this new standard will facilitate 
and enhance cross-platform audio 
development and implementation while 
saving money. The discussion period of this 
session will allow attendees the opportunity 
to provide feedback on the specification and 
present ways in which they can contribute to 
it's formation and adoption. 

Lecture - Beginner 
Designing an Interactive Music System 
Jason Booth See page ngfor bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 
Almaden, Hilton 

This roundtable discusses the thought 
processes, problems and solutions involved in 
creating an interactive music system. Topics 
include analyzing your game's design to 
determine what type of system is right for 
your game, choosing an off the shelf solution, 
and the technical and compositional problems 
you are likely to face with each type of system. 
An analysis and demo of several interactive 
music systems are provided by the speaker, 
and attendees are encouraged to bring war 
stories about their current or past projects. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave with an 
understanding of how previous interactive 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of GDC 2004. 



-44- 



www.gdconf.com 



AUDIO TRACK 



music systems have been created, what they have done to enhance the 
experience of those games, and what problems they have to face in 
creating or composing their own interactive music systems. 

Intended Audience: This session is designed for composers, or 
programmers wishing to work with interactive music in their projects, or 
designers who want to better understand how music can enhance the 
experience of their game. 

Sponsored by Dolby 
Encoders, Decoders, Technology, Oh My! 
Jack Buser See page no for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 2:303:30pm 
Ai, Convention Center 

With an increasing number of audio technologies appearing in today's 
consumer electronics, it's more important than ever for game audio 
professionals to have an in-depth understanding of both encoders and 
decoders, as well as the technology that powers them. This session is 
intended to introduce and reinforce intermediate and advanced topics 
relating to Dolby technology, decoders, and encoders. 

This session also introduces new multichannel decoding technologies 
appearing in the latest consumer products, including 7.1-channel Dolby 
Pro Logic llx, Dolby Virtual Speaker, and Dolby Headphone. The effect 
these new decoding technologies will have on game audio 
development, as well as new considerations and suggestions for 
monitoring will be covered. New studio encoders for linear and 
streaming content will be introduced, along with a description of 
Dolby's own hardware encoding solutions. 

Advanced topics regarding today's game audio formats, including Dolby 
Digital and Dolby Pro Logic II, are covered in depth during this session. 
The session will also explore audio engine techniques for real-time 
interaction with multichannel audio, and offer suggestions for in-game 
Center and LFE channel usage. 

Takeaway: In depth understanding of new encoders and next- 
generation decoders, as well as a peek at upcoming Dolby audio 
technologies for games. 

Intended Audience: Game audio producers, programmers, and sound 
designers familiar with existing Dolby technologies. 

Sponsored by Creative Labs 

GameCODA: The Affordable Cross-Platform Game Audio Solution 

Mike Clarke & Adam Philp See pages 121 & 133 for bios 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 

Ci, Convention Center 

Games are getting bigger all the time, and consequently middleware is 
becoming an essential tool of game development. Yet it seems that in 
general, audio resources are not expanding to meet this need and 
audio middleware is an area that should not be overlooked. The 
GameCODA product has enough features and tools to take away the 
grunt work for both the Sound Designer and Programmer leaving you 
with much more time to get on with actually making the game sound 
good! It is scalable, flexible, feature-rich, easy-to-use, and fully cross- 
platform. In short, it is the most comprehensive audio middleware suite 
available today. This presentation will demonstrate some of these 
features and their usage in real-world game development, from our 
Sound Designer tools and artist plugins, right down to the high-level 




and low-level APIs and their integration 



Takeaway: Greater knowledge of the current state of audio middleware 
in the games industry and detailed knowledge of the GameCODA 
feature set. 

Intended Audience: Sound Designers, Audio Programmers, and 
Producers. No prerequisites. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Game Soundtracks: Structuring Your Deal Like the Movies 

Jim Charne See page no for bio 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-ii:3oam 

A7, Convention Center 

The status quo for game music soundtrack composers leaves a lot to be 
desired. Rights are typically granted on a work-for-hire basis with no 
compensation other than the initial fee for services. Unlike programming 
and graphics work, there is a 100+ year industry standard for the 
treatment of music, including at least 75 years since the Jazz Singer, 
Warner Bros.' first talking picture. This program looks at deal structure for 
soundtracks in the motion picture industry. We look at copyrights, touch 
on music publishing, and explore areas where composers can look to 
retain rights and revenue streams from their music. Every effort are made 
to leave time for a question and answer session. 

Takeaway: Alternatives to consider when confronted with a buy out of 
your music. 

Intended Audience: Composers who create music, or want to create 
music, for interactive games. 

Panel - Intermediate 
The Hobbit: A Case Study 
Rob Abernethy, Dave Adams, Jason Graves, Marc Schaefgen 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 • i2-ipm 
Almaden, Hilton 

Delving into the audio production behind The Hobbit, the panel details 
the positive and negative aspects of said production. With a very limited 
budget the audio team pulled together a top notch musical score with 
over 20 minutes of orchestral music recorded by the Northwest Sinfonia, 
in addition to 40 minutes of acoustic and 90 minutes of ambient music. 
The Hobbit features full voice implementation for five languages, no 
text without accompanying voice. The sound design rounds out the 
production including ambience tracks, creature and combat sounds, 
along with the usual bevy of sound effects. The panel will also discuss 
the non-creative aspects including pre-production, workflow, data 
management, and audio team dynamics. 

Takeaway: The attendees leave this presentation with a better 
understanding of what it takes to bring together all of the elements in a 
game audio production. Also, information regarding working pipelines, 
team dynamics, inter-discipline communication, and long distance 
working relationships will be gleaned. 

Intended Audience: This panel is intended for audio professionals and 
any other discipline that is interested in what it takes to pull together a 
complete game audio production. 



AUDIO TRACK 



Lecture - Intermediate 

How to Budget Audio: "What Am I 

Forgetting?" 

Tommy Tallarico See page 18 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:303:30pm 

Almaden, Hilton 

The quality of audio in video games is 
changing so rapidly that it is nearly impossible 
to keep up. We are in a time where most game 
audio productions and experiences are on the 
same quality level as motion pictures. But as 
an audio director or independent contractor 
what are all of the things I'll need to know in 
order to budget properly for a project? Not 
only are dollars and cents be examined, but 
time elements as well. Live music, voice-overs, 
sound design, extra platforms, mixing and 
mastering, contractors, etc. are discussed. The 
last thing you want to have happen is a game 
your working on not sounding 100% perfect 
because of time or money issues not being 
properly budgeted at the beginning. 

Takeaway: A complete knowledge of all aspects 
of game audio and how much time and money 
it takes to complete the given task. 

Intended Audience: Audio directors and 
independent contractors whose responsibility 
it is to provide bids or budgets for a project, or 
anyone else interested in knowing what 
others are charging. 

Sponsored by Creative Labs 

Interactive 3D Audio the Easy Way: The ISACT 

Experience 

Peter Harrison See page 725 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

Ci, Convention Center 

3D sound technology on the PC ranges from 
the sublime - high definition soundcards like 
Creative's SoundBlaster Audigy series - to the 
ridiculous - motherboard audio with simple 
host-based 3D spatialisation. 

Ideally, you want to make top quality 
interactive surround content for your games. 
You'd like to take full advantage of the 
multiple 3D voices, hardware accelerated 
environmental effects, and multi-speaker 
rendering offered by the very latest audio 
gaming hardware. 

But first you'll have to build your own toolset. 
And worse -you'll spend an age figuring out 
how to scale back your audio content to work 
on a lower spec PCs. And then you'll have to 
re-master all the content for the console 
version. ..right? 



Wrong! Creative's custom engineering team 
took a long hard look at the challenges 
associated with creating and using first rate 
audio. We created a set of technologies for 
authoring and playing back the most 
advanced 3D audio on PC .We applied our 
experience of multiple generations of audio 
hardware, to ensure that the content you 
create sounds good on all systems. And we call 
these technologies "Interactive Spatialised 
Audio Composition Technology", or ISACT. 

The ISACT Production Studio tool will be your 
key to the technology. Using this application, 
the presentation will demonstrate the core 
features of ISACT, from 3D interactive 
compositions to variable data-driven sound 
events. We will also look into how ISACT's 
playback layer can be integrated into nearly 
any audio engine. And those developers on a 
multi-platform mission will find that, with a 
little help from Creative's partners Sensaura, 
you will be able to deploy ISACT content right 
into your console projects! 

Takeaway: A feel for the most advanced audio 
technologies offered on PC soundcards, and 
how these technologies can be made 
accessible on a variety of platforms using 
Creative Labs and Sensaura developer tools. 

Intended Audience: Anyone interested in 
game audio- musicians, designers, 
programmers. ...Ok, even managers can come 
too. No pre-requisites. 

Panel - Intermediate 

Mixing and Mastering Music and Sound 

for Games 

Buzz Burrowes, Scott Gershin, Alan Howarth, 

Simon Pressey, Jack Wall 

See pages nj-i4ifor bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 

Almaden, Hilton 

How do you make a sound pop out of the 
speakers - especially small ones? What's the 
best way to make the aural mix of your game 
the most real? How about the most surreal? 
How do you mix and master music and sound 
specifically for games? It is becoming 
increasing apparent that a quality mix of 
audio elements is an essential part of any well 
designed game. This panel, consisting of 
experts in the field of recording engineering, 
mixing and mastering, come together to 
answer these questions and many more.Their 
unique points of view of mixing and 
mastering in the fields of music and film are 
offered as guidelines for the same in games. 
Of course, a main focus are the differences 



inherent in this relatively new medium where 
sonic quality is exploding with each newly 
released title. 

Topics covered in the presentation are: 

-Secrets of the "perfect" mix Mixing for the 
small screen 

- 5.1 mixing 

- Special effects and when to use them 

- What are the best methods for blending VO, 
SFX and Music in a linear, pre-rendered 
cinematic 

- Importance of mixing tools (console, 
speakers, etc.) and environment 

- Relative volume, space and dynamics - it's ok 
to be quiet now and then! 

- Mastering - what is it? Do you need it? 

- Working with others - when the mix is 
generated from the game audio engine. 

Mixing is one of those disciplines where craft 
meets art. There are so many ways to achieve 
great results that our well-rounded panel 
presents multiple ways of achieving that 
much desired and necessary outcome - a 
superbly mixed game. 

Takeaway: Audience members leave with 
knowledge of mixing and mastering 
techniques. They also form a part of a much 
larger discussion about the importance of 
relative volumes, space, and dynamics in order 
to make a more dramatic entertainment 
experience for the gamer. 

Intended Audience: Professionals and 
students who are involved in getting music, 
sound, and dialogue in games. This would 
include audio producers, game producers and 
audio programmers. 

Sponsored by Creative Labs 
OpenAL Everywhere 
Garin Hiebert See page 126 for bio 
Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 
C4, Convention Center 

This session offers a very brief introduction to 
the OpenAL 3D audio API and an explanation 
of how OpenAL could be the best audio API for 
your next cross-platform project (now 
including console gaming systems!). The focus 
will be on the current status of OpenAL, 
enumerating and using multiple hardware 
and software devices when available, and 
limiting product risk and testing. 

Takeaway: An attendee come away from this 
session knowing the current state of OpenAL - 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 






The Magazine 

sssr. Yourmedia resource 



C/>2 






for Film, Television, 
Gaming and mor 





Computer Graphics World provides digital 
content professionals essential information on 
the production tools and applications necessary 
to make them successful. The award-winning 
editorial covers the convergence of 
technology and what it means to film, 
TV, gaming, graphic arts and the web. / 
Each month, Computer Graphics World / *i£g 
presents product news, user stories, / 
industry analysis, in-depth features / 
and hands-on reviews. Combine A 

this with a bi-monthly e-newsletter / 
delivered right to your desktop / 
and a website updated daily / 

/ ^ 

with news exclusives, and you / 
ive an information-rich / f 

dia resource. ' 



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WHAT DO THE LEADING 



GAMES RETAILERS 



ABOUT YOUR TIT 




Even before it's released, 
hundreds of decision makers at 
game publishers, developers, and 
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Plus, you'll get the answers to these 
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current level of user interest in your 
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Who (by demographic) is interested 
n your game? 

Now is your chance to learn about 
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Attend our GDC session: 
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Thursday, March 25, 2004 
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GameSpot and GameSpot TRAX are CNET Networks ' properties. 





Join the IGDA in 
uniting the global 
game development 
community. 
www.igda.org 







ie International Game Developers 
ssociation is a non-profit membership 
irganization that advocates globally on 
ssues related to digital game creation, 
me IGDA's mission is to strengthen the 
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that community. For more information 
on the IGDA, please visit www.igda.org 
or email info®igda.org. 



-A9- 



BUSINESS & LEGAL KEYNOTE 





Prepping for the Transition: Will You Be Ready? 

John Schappert 

Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 
B2, Convention Center 



What should studio teams and leaders do to prepare for the next technology transition? How many 
engineers should you platoon to preparing for the next generation of consoles? How much should you 
be spending? And honestly, how much do we really know about spec? This year, hardware price cuts 
will bring millions of new consumers to gaming and drive the installed base toward 150 million units 
worldwide. The economic reality forces developers to ask some hard questions: With such a big 
opportunity in the existing market, can you really afford to assign a team to a technology that won't 
be relevant for 2-3 years? What's the opportunity cost of dedicating a team of engineers to next 
generation technology when they could be making games that earn millions on this generation? 

The answer depends on the size and long-term business objectives of your studio. The strategy of EA, 
Activision and Atari is very different from smaller, independent studios that produce one or two games 
per year. EA Senior Vice President and General Manager of EA Canada, John Schappert, offers some 
guidelines for navigating the transition - practical advice for small, medium and large studios. John is 
responsible for the management of EA's Canadian operations, which is the largest interactive game 
studio in the world. This includes overseeing programming, artwork, audio, research and development, 
quality assurance, and strategy for top EA SPORTS titles as well as EA GAMES and EA SPORTS BIG 
franchises. 



John Schappert 

John Schappert, as general manager of Electronic Arts Canada, is responsible for the management of 
EA's Canadian operations, which is the largest interactive game studio in the world. This includes 
overseeing programming, artwork, audio, research and development, quality assurance, and strategy 
for top EA SPORTS titles as well as EA GAMES and EA SPORTS BIG franchises including: NBA LIVE 
Basketball, NHL Hockey, FIFA Soccer, MVP Baseball, NCAA March Madness, Need for Speed Racing, 
Def Jam Vendetta, SSX, and NBA Street on video game consoles and the PC. Prior to his current 
position, John was general manager and executive in charge of production at EA Tiburon. Prior to that 
he held a variety of senior production and development posts within EA. John co-founded Tiburon 
Entertainment in 1994 and grew the studio from three original employees to more than 150 employees. 
John has overseen the creation of more than 50 games for Electronic Arts, including the best-selling 
Madden NFL Football franchise. He and his wife and son live in Vancouver. 









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BUSINESS & LEGAL TRACK 




All studios face enormous challenges today. The game industry is mitigating risk by basing a 
large proportion of new products on known licenses and sequels to popular games. Projects 
perceived as too weak to take to market are more likely to be killed during development. To 
create a business environment that supports the creation of superior games, developers need 
both sound business strategies and outstanding tactical execution. The Business and Legal track 
looks at the game development process from the standpoint of running the business and offers 
proven strategies for the developer who needs to understand complex business issues. 



Lecture - Intermediate 

Building Value in Your Company: One Small Studio's Approach 

Angus Chassels & Jeremy Cordon See pages 120 & 124 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 

A7, Convention Center 

Solid team members, great games, a good reputation, good credit, cash 
assets and quality of life are a few of the many ways to measure the 
value of your game development company.This talk discusses these and 
other valuation metrics (traditional and not) along with workable 
strategies to grow the value in your own business. This talk is grounded 
in the realities of the current market conditions using San Francisco 
based Secret Level as a case study. 

Takeaway: There are many ways to measure the value of your small 
game development company.This talk offers anecdotal experience 
garnered from running small game studios to help the listener better 
define and build value in their own company. 

Intended Audience: Game developers thinking of starting their own 
business, small business owner/operators and publishers looking to get 
into the mind of a small developer. No prior experience needed. 

Lecture - All 

Doing Business With Europe: A Survivor's Guide 

Vincent Scheurer See page 736 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 

Bi, Convention Center 

Commercial relationships between games companies in the U.S. and 
Europe can be complicated by the different cultural and legal principles 
which apply in each party's own country. These differences can 
sometimes prevent a deal from happening or worse, cause a project or 
relationship to fail at an advanced stage. However, the risks of failure 
can be limited by a sound understanding of the other party's take on the 
cultural and legal background to the deal. 

The purpose of this lecture is to explain some of the key cultural 
differences prevailing in Europe in relation to computer games 
development and publishing; suggest possible solutions to the problems 
caused (or perceived) as a result of these differences; and address some 
strategies for reducing the risk of a failure of a negotiation, or a project, 
or a relationship, as a result of these cultural and legal differences. 

The lecture concentrates on real life examples of difficulties which can 
occur due to different cultural and legal standpoints, and proposes 
realistic solutions to some of the most common problems including 



ownership of game IP, residual authors' rights, the use and abuse of 
penalty clauses, jurisdictional disputes, and strange concepts such as 
"equitable remuneration" which simply do not travel well. 

The relationships between Ubi Soft and Red Storm, and Take Two and 
Rockstar North, show that partnerships between the U.S. and Europe 
have resulted in some of the greatest recent commercial successes in 
the games industry. The games industry is a global industry and 
developers must form global alliances in order to survive and succeed. 
This lecture addresses some of the barriers to forming global alliances, 
and how they can be overcome. 

This lecture is addressed to attendees from all jurisdictions who may be 
involved in making a deal, or managing a relationship, with a company 
from a different jurisdiction where one of the parties is based in Europe. 

Takeaway: The purpose of the lecture is to assist attendees in 
developing and managing commercial relationships with companies in 
different countries if one of the parties is based in Europe. The attendees 
learn some of the varying(and conflicting) cultural and legal principles 
which apply to games development and exploitation within different 
European countries, and how these compare with the principles adopted 
within the United States. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The End Came: How Top Developers Sold Their Studios 

Dan Rogers See page 135 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 

A7, Convention Center 

In November 2002 Angel Studios, an independent game developer 
located just north of San Diego, was purchased by Take Two for 28 
million dollars and 235,000 shares of stock. A month earlier Activision 
purchased Luxoflux for 9 million and 110,000 shares. In the same year 
Infogrames (now Atari) purchased Shiny for a surprising 47 million 
dollars, and who can forget Microsoft's purchase of Rare for a whopping 
375 million? 

For many independent game developers, selling out is the ultimate end 
game, the final prize for a race well run. But what do you really know 
about how a deal goes down and whether or not you are even a good 
prospect? What is it that will make your studio attractive? How will your 
company be valued? And perhaps most importantly, what can you do 
to prepare? 

In this session, we present the most accurate and up to date 
information available on this topic of game developer acquisition. Our 






> 



-51- 



BUSINESS & LEGAL TRACK 



information is based on in-depth interviews 
with key executives on both sides of the 
acquisition coin: from independent game 
studios who have been purchased and from 
the publishers who purchased them. 

Takeaway: After attending this session, 
attendees have a good understanding of the 
dynamics of a publisher acquisition of a 
develompent studio, including: 

- what the attributes are of an acquisition 
candidate 

- how you prepare your company to be sold 

- how your company will be valued 

- how you go about finding a purchaser 

- what happens after the purchase and what 
are your obligations 

- how you will be paid 

- the advantages and disadvantages 
-what can go wrong 

Intended Audience: Attendees should have a 
basic understanding of the game 
development business and the major 
publishers. They should have a basic level 
business management and finance. 

Lecture - Beginner 

Everything You Need to Know to Make 

Money in Coin-Op 

Elaine Hodgson See page 14 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 

F1, Convention Center 

Once, the only way to enjoy a videogame was to 
find an arcade and drop quarters into the coin 
machines. Now there are countless ways to play 
videogames. Even though coin-op has taken a 
smaller role, don't be fooled. It still offers 
opportunities and generates significant money. 
This talk illustrates with the story of Golden Tee 
Golf; the game that has been at the top of the 
coin-op charts for over eight years, the game 
that introduced networked play to the coin-op 
market, the game that has awarded over $10 
million in prizes. Attendees learn about all 
aspects of this interesting segment of the 
entertainment industry and how developers can 
take advantage of this market. 

Takeaway: The attendee takeaway is what the 
coin-operated industry is about today, an 
analysis of what works in coin-op and why, 
what are the trends of the future, and what 
opportunities exist. Most importantly, the 
story of Golden Tee Golf illustrates how to 
target a market, innovate for it, ignore conven- 
tional wisdom, and ultimately succeed at 
dominating a market niche. 



Intended Audience: This lecture benefits game 
designers and publishers of consumer games 
who want to learn about design and business 
opportunities in the coin-op industry. It also 
appeals to those who might see ideas in the 
case study of Golden Tee Golf which can 
solve current problems running through their 
minds. 

Sponsored by Trymedia 
Feel Good Game Security 
Gabe Zichermann See page 141 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 
C4, Convention Center 

Let's face it, most developers are primarily 
concerned with making a good game that 
people will like and tell their friends about. 
What's the big deal if a few people copy it? 
After all, once you've been paid to develop the 
game isn't that the publisher's problem? 
Animated (and sometimes controversial) 
speaker Gabe Zichermann explores the 
concepts of secure sharing, simplified product 
activation, viral marketing and more great 
ways to make everybody - from developer, to 
publisherto end-user- happy. There is 
something in it foryou after all. 

Takeaway: Learn how game protection can be 
a more positive experience. ..and maybe even 
earn you some extra income to boot. 

Intended Audience: Producers and managers 
responsible for game security decision- 
making, including developers who self-publish 
their games. 

Lecture - Beginner 

Follow The Money: Understanding Console 

Publishers 

Bill Swartz See page 138 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

Salon IV, Marriott 

Console game publishing is a business, and 
like any business the best way to understand 
it is to follow the money. This presentation 
starts by explaining the form and content of a 
product profit and loss statement for a typical 
product at a midsized publisher. It then drills 
down on each major P&L component (gross 
revenue, net revenue, COGs, royalty/dev cost, 
fixed overhead, variable marketing, and 
variable development) to show where a 
publisher's money goes and what it expects in 
return. With this background, and a very brief 
discussion of retail margins, the presentation 
goes on to discuss specific strategies 
publishers commonly use to maximize 
profitability and manage their three primary 



risks: development, market acceptance, and 
distribution. 

Takeaway: Publishers make rational choices 
based on their own interests and the options 
available to them. This presentation explains 
how publishers calculate their interest, the 
risks they face and the strategies they use to 
maximize profitability. 

Intended Audience: If you want to be a 
publisher, if you deal with publishers and want 
to understand their thinking, if you work for a 
publisher but feel a bit lost in the trees, this 
presentation is for you. There is no prereq- 
uisite knowledge required. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Game Soundtracks: Structuring Your Deal 

Like the Movies 

Jim Charne See page no for bio 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-ii:3oam 

A7, Convention Center 

The status quo for game music soundtrack 
composers leaves a lot to be desired. Rights 
are typically granted on a work-for-hire basis 
with no compensation other than the initial 
fee for services. Unlike programming and 
graphics work, there is a 100+ year industry 
standard for the treatment of music, including 
at least 75 years since the Jazz Singer, Warner 
Bros.' first talking picture. This program looks 
at deal structure for soundtracks in the 
motion picture industry. We look at copyrights, 
touch on music publishing, and explore areas 
where composers can look to retain rights and 
revenue streams from their music. Every effort 
are made to leave time for a question and 
answer session. 

Takeaway: Alternatives to consider when 
confronted with a buy out of your music. 

Intended Audience: Composers who create 
music, or want to create music, for interactive 
games. 

Sponsored by GameSpot 
GameSpot Trax: Get the Buzz on Your Game 
(Before Your Competitors Do) 
Scott Bedard & Josh Larson 

See pages 118 & ngfor bios 
Thursday, March 25 • g-ioam 
Ci, Convention Center 

Even before it's released, hundreds of decision 
makers at game publishers, developers, and 
retailers already have detailed information 
about your game. Don't lose your competitive 
edge. Join industry insiders for a complete 
GameSpot Trax demo, and find out what the 

See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of GDC 2004. 



-52- 



www.gdconf.com 



BUSINESS & LEGAL TRACK 



buzz is all about. With GameSpotTrax, you'll get a real-time view into 
consumer interest and demand for your game, not to mention the 
games in your competitive set. 

Discover the answers to the following questions: What's the current 
level of user interest in your game? How does it stack up against the 
competition? What are the editorial sources saying about it? Who (by 
demographics) is interested in your game? Now is your chance to learn 
about and gain complimentary access to this innovative and powerful 
tool. 

Takeaway: GameSpot Trax is an analytical tool that gives you a 
competitive edge when developing or marketing your game title. 

Intended Audience: Game developers, marketers and publishers. 

Round-table - Intermediate 

Getting Paid for Milestones: How to Avoid Being Stiffed When 

They're Giving Your Publisher Last Rites 

Jim Charne See page no for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • i2-ipm 

L, Convention Center 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

D, Convention Center 

The failure of 3DO and the meltdown of BAM resulted in casualties 
(some fatal) among developers who were left unpaid for milestones and 
projects. This roundtable presents a comprehensive strategy for 
developers to follow that can help them get paid. Participants are 
invited to share their experiences, in order to help everyone avoid 
getting caught in the next downward spiral. 

Takeaway: By following a disciplined strategy, from the start of contract 
negotiation through delivery of the final gold master, developers can 
lessen the risk of suffering financial losses when your developer stops 
paying. 

Intended Audience: Developer CEOs, directors, business managers, credit 
managers, and anyone who is interested in getting paid for his or her 
work. 

Lecture - Beginner 

How to Get More Coverage for Your Company and Titles 

Sue Bohle See page ugfor bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 

Ft, Convention Center 

What does it take to garner positive coverage of your company 
executives, products, and services outside of the game press? If you have 
a crisis, how do you avoid negative press? 

Sue Bohle, president of The Bohle Company, discusses how game 
industry companies can maximize their visibility in the consumer and 
business press. She covers how to maximize game coverage, prepare a 
CEO for interviews and how to handle negative publicity. Also covered 
are when to do/not to do media events, and the best way to conduct 
media tours. Handouts include checklists and interview tips. 

Takeaway: Participants leave the session able to identify the character- 
istics and value of different types of game media outlets. They learn to 
maximize company and product coverage in consumer and business 
press, as well as the game press; prepare company executives for media 



interviews; and respond effectively to negative publicity/crisis situations. 

Intended Audience: CEOs and marketing people at game developers and 
publishers. Only a general understanding of the media that cover 
videogames is necessary. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
HR in the Studio 
Sam Park See page 133 for bio 
Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 
Bi, Convention Center 

Sam Park, Shiny Entertainment's human resources manager, discusses 
the role of HR within the environment of a game development studio. 
The lecture covers hard topics such as financing, recruiting, studio 
efficiency and HR-related legal issues, as well as the trickier subjects of 
job definitions, corporate communications relating to HR, and day-to- 
day employee relations among producers, programmers and artists. The 
lecture also shares some lessons learned from the development process 
of Shiny's most recent project, Enter The Matrix, focusing on the role of 
HR in both coordinating with external contractors and acquiring 
additional crunch-time brainpower and QA from other developers 
within the corporate family.The discussion wraps up with a brief 
question-and-answer session. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The I-Spy Book of Developer Contract Law 

Darren Jobling See page nyfor bio 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

Fi, Convention Center 

This is a session by an independent developer, not an attorney, giving 
those dealing with development contracts hints and tips on what they 
need to do to a publisher's proposed development agreement to make it 
signable. Starting with a draft contract, the major clauses are pulled 
apart and reassembled to create a contract that both developers and 
publishers can agree upon and execute. 

Takeaway: The attendees takeaway what to look out for in development 
contracts, both the positives and the negatives. How to amend legal 
clauses so that they are fair to both developer and publisher, and reflect 
what really happens in the development world. Tactics to persuade 
publishers to accept clauses that are of benefit to the developer. How to 
do the work yourself, understanding what you are signing while cutting 
down on your legal bills. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Immigration for Foreign Games Professionals in the Age of 

Homeland Security 

Ron Rose See page 135 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 4-5pm 

B2, Convention Center 

This session covers the various options for games companies in hiring 
and retaining foreign national talent. Recruitment factors are analyzed. 
Visa options are presented. Timing and logistical issues are explained. 
Strategic approaches for leveraging the global talent pool of games 
professionals are covered in detail. Competitive advantages for hiring 
highly sought after foreign talent are revealed. The session also explains 
the steps that the company must take to keep in compliance with new 
homeland security laws, while utilizing leading edge global talent 







■53- 



BUSINESS & LEGAL TRACK 



optimization strategies. 

Takeaway: How to successfully mine the 
global talent pool for games professionals 
without violating homeland security laws. 

Intended Audience: HR managers and 
recruiters for games companies. In-house legal 
counsel for games companies. Producers and 
other games production professionals 
involved in hiring and/or coordination of 
persons involved in games development. 

Panel - All 

Industry & Government: Working Together 

Fronda J. Cohen, Michael C. Elkin, Alison Kelly 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
Friday, March 26 • 2:303:30pm 
A2, Convention Center 

This panel discusses the many resources 
available to those who are looking for funding 
and assistance to launch or to support their 
existing development efforts. This panel 
includes assistance available to developers in 
the form of government tax breaks, 
development incentives, and opportunities 
available through government agencies such 
as SBA subsidies, funding, grants, loans, 
government contracts, and other such 
resources. 

Whether you are a new developer looking to 
get government grants or loans to start your 
dream company, or an established developer 
who may not be aware of what assistance is 
available to you, this panel discussion is 
intended to help you continue in your path to 
making great games. This panel will discuss 
everything you wanted to know about 
obtaining financing for your business. This 
seminars cover the different types of 
financing, SBA loans, mezzanine loans, raising 
money from angel investors or venture 
capitalists, micro loans, grants, tax breaks, 
training grants, federal and state business 
development assistance and financial 
assistance etc. In addition, this session also 
cover the steps necessary to bid on 
government contracts and work with the 
different departments within the Department 
of Defense. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave the panel 
discussion with a wealth of ideas and 
strategies to be able to take advantage of the 
many government recourses that are available 
to them. The goal is to improve the industry 
by empowering developers with needed 
knowledge on government programs and 
recourses. 



Intended Audience: This is intended for start 
up/newbie game studios to industry veterans 
managing game development studios, 
publisher executives, and other industry 
leaders who care about the strength and 
future growth of their companies and the 
game development community. 

Panel - Intermediate 

Interfacing With Hollywood: Challenges 

and opportunties 

Keith Boesky, Leonard Grossi, Charles 

Hirschorn, Jason Rubin, Larry Shapiro 

See pages 117-141 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 

B2, Convention Center 

The success of Videogames relative to Music, 
Movies, and Television has once again focused 
attention from those industries on ours. This 
time, some Videogame creators are finding 
lucrative synergies and opportunities 
inconnecting with Hollywood. They are also 
finding the usual challenges, barriers, and 
confusion. This panel discusses not only the 
possibilities and pitfalls of working with 
Hollywood, but also some of the inescapable 
realities that the current movement will bring 
to Videogame development. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Minefields in Videogame Intellectual 
Property Protection 
Stephen Rubin See page 135 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 2:303:30pm 
Bi, Convention Center 

The range of intellectual property protections 
afforded game developers are considered in 
the context of how such rights can be 
compromised or lost through commonly 
committed errors or inaction. The first step is 
to understand the forms of intellectual 
property developers create. The intellectual 
property minefields within standard publisher 
and employee agreements, within copyright 
work-for-hire rules, within trade secret 
disclosures to publishers, and within 
registration requirements for patents, 
trademarks, and copyrights are discussed. The 
biggest challenge facing developers is to 
identify the minefields. Solutions generally are 
not difficult if adopted in time. A map to 
navigate the major minefields is provided in 
the form of a checklist of protective measures. 

Roundtable - Beginner 
Mobile Games: Down to Business 
David Collier See page 121 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 
E, Convention Center 



Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 
E, Convention Center 

This year mobile games moved from 
powerpoint decks to mobile phones in sweaty 
hands, all over the planet. This session usees 
the unique arena that is GDC, where 
Publishers, Carriers and Developers from all 
over the world come together in one place. 

Through a structured discussion we'll dish the 

dirt: 

- Which phones don't work as advertised? 

- Which carriers take six months to pay up? 

- Which brand holders can't close a deal? 

And follow with constructive creative 
discussion on the high points of the year: 

- Which carriers are doing the numbers and 
what do they like? 

- What do new technologies like MIDP2 allow 
in mobile games? 

- What were the best games this year and 
which ideas made them? 

Everyone in this industry has something to 
say, and this is the GDC forum to say it. ..DC 
leads the roundtable drawing from his 
experience at the cutting edge of Japan's 
mobile game business. 

Takeaway: As the industry matures, you have 
to get smarter. It's no longer enough to be out 
early with some puzzle games, major studios 
and publishers are putting big money behind 
their mobile game bets. Find out where the 
niches are as we go around the room and 
discuss what everyone else is doing. Is it 
massively multiplayer? Is it messaging games 
through MIDP2.0? Is it more casual puzzles? 
Kick the tires of your competitors and bounce 
ideas off the carriers to see what might fly. 

Lecture - All 

Mobile Games: Lessons from Online Games 

Dan Scherlis See page 136 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 

A7, Convention Center 

The mobile games business is echoing the 
earlier evolution of online games, with similar 
uncertainties over business models and 
partnerships. In both cases, early participants 
expected retail-game publishers to take 
leadership, with deal terms familiar from retail 
relationships. In both cases, new or different 
players have taken leadership, and new 
financing models have evolved. And the 
successful games are those designed most 
closely for the new medium, while "shovel- 



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BUSINESS & LEGAL TRACK 



ware" and thoughtless ports have suffered. 

But mobile games have followed only part of the path of online games, 
with the most profitable terrain remaining largely unexplored. Online 
games stratified themselves into free (or inexpensive) casual games 
versus premium-priced massively multiplayer games, which were the 
most profitable online games (despite being identified as "core gamer" 
phenomena). Today, mobile games seek the "mass market," and are 
dominated by a small number of simple game types. Unlike online 
games, few mobile games take advantage of the network, offer 
substantial depth, or harness the potential for community-based 
gameplay. 

This session examines the structure of this new industry, the key players, 
and the products that are being delivered. Online games will be used as 
a case study with regard to consumer pricing & distribution, to 
partnership structures and roles, and to the likely leaders and success 
stories for mobile games. Specifics and examples are provided. 

The opportunity for premium and subscription-based mobile games are 
examined, in the context of the business and technical aspects of the 
mobile environment, including the incentives and culture of the network 
operators (carriers). Although massive 3D worlds are not practical on 
today's mobile devices, mobile games can learn from the principles 
shared by the online games that have succeeded in commanding 
premium pricing and long-term subscriptions. 

Takeaway: Mobile games, like online games, are a new medium that is 
different from retail-packaged games. Each of the business, technical, 
and creative elements affects each other; failure to consider each 
element in context of the others invites disaster. For online games, the 
classic retail publishers have not taken leadership, and mobile games 
will also see different players, different partnerships, and different deal 
terms. The most lucrative mobile games have not yet been created. The 
top mobile games take full advantage of the mobile network, building 
on community and multiplayer concepts expressed in premium online 
games. 

Panel - All 

Music Licensing for Videogames: How Popular Music and Artists 

Can Make Games Pop 

Nelson Bae, Seth Berg, Keith DArcy, Victor Rodriguez 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 
A2, Convention Center 

In this panel discussion, executives from a music publishing company, a 
record label, and a game development company discuss how to get the 
best popular music into your game. They present several issues: how to 
find the right person to contact to clear your music, what goes into 
music licenses for videogame projects, how to prepare and market a 
soundtrack release, and how to contract a popular artist to compose 
original music for your game. 

Takeaway: Participants learn music licensing basics: What's the 
difference between a synchronization license and a master use license? 
Who do you contact to clear synch and master rights? What are the 
necessary terms in a music license? The presenters discuss the basic 
principals of music supervision, how to budget for the various types of 
licenses a project requires, and how much time you'll need. They 
examine the structure and strategy of licensing for music-based games 
vs. music-enhanced games. What are the benefits of negotiating royalty 



rates vs. set fees for licensing? Do you need a music supervision service 
or can you do your own supervision, administration, and clearance? 

Intended Audience: The information presented in this panel is beneficial 
to game audio supervisors, game developers and publishing profes- 
sionals; anyone whose job it is to enhance the gaming experience by 
acquiring external copyrighted music elements while operating under 
time, budget and administrative constraints. General understanding of 
licensing contracts is helpful but not essential. 

Panel - All 

Music Publishing: A Primer for Game Developers and Composers 

Jeff Brabec, Todd Brabec, Shawn Clement, Steve Schnur, Jack Wall 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 
B2, Convention Center 

A lively panel discussing copyright terminology.common entertainment 
industry business models and practices, revenue opportunities for music 
assets, and establishing productive partnerships between music creators 
and game developers. 

Panelists include an entertainment attorney, a music publisher, a game 
developer, and a composer. This panel is moderated by a leading 
member of ASCAP. 

Takeaway: The attendees walk away with a better understanding of the 
business and creative aspects of producing and placing music in 
interactive media. Also, they gain a deeper appreciation of the value of 
establishing productive partnerships between the game development 
community and music creators. 

Intended Audience: Game developers and publishers, composers, and 
business and legal affairs professionals. 

Panel - Advanced 

The Negotiation 

Tom Buscaglia, Barry Friedman, Lee Jacobson See pages 117-141 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-spm 

B2, Convention Center 

Game attorney Tom Buscaglia referees a publisher/developer 
negotiation between Barry Friedman and Lee Jacobson. These three 
gentlemen have combined game industry experience of 50 years and 
have logged thousands of hours negotiating contracts, deals and 
disputes. They present a condensed version of a negotiation that, in real 
life, could take days or even weeks to complete. Attendees have an 
opportunity to ask questions of them concerning what occurred during 
the negotiation for purpose for some of their actions and challenge the 
results of what occurred. 

Attendees are presented with a draft of a contract terms to be 
negotiated. These terms are in a form presented by a fictitious publisher 
to a similarly fictitious developer. Attendees also receive a "red-lined" 
version of the same agreement containing revisions to the original 
agreement made by the developer's counsel. There is also be a brief 
description of the relative bargaining positions of the parties including 
the need of the publisher for content for a game within the genre 
presented by the developer and a developer's experience as well as 
potential interest from other publishers in the project. Every effort is 
made to have this presentation of the negotiation represent a realistic 
scenario. 




BUSINESS & LEGAL TRACK 



The panel start with a point by point 
discussion of issues that were raised in the 
developer's response to the initial proposal of 
the publisher. Each side then discusses their 
preparation and outline their tactics and goals 
prior to beginning the negotiation. The mock 
negotiation then begins. Their discussion 
demonstrates how some deal points, 
important to one party in the contract, are 
often concealed within the negotiation 
process. Parties may also discuss certain issues 
which are, in reality, merely bargaining chips 
intentionally inserted within the agreement 
by one party or the other in order to be able to 
appear flexible on some issues while taking a 
much harder position on others. 

Takeaway: The presenters use their skills in an 
effort to show how what is often a very 
adversarial process can be successfully 
accomplished in a congenial and professional 
manner, even when the stakes are high. 

Throughout the presentation those in 
attendance periodically are given an 
opportunity to ask questions of the presenters 
on the issues raised during the course of the 
presentation. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 

Online Games Business: Best Practices, or 

Learning from the Smart (and Not So 

Smart) Things Other People Do 

Jennifer MacLean See page 730 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 

E, Convention Center 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

L, Convention Center 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

L, Convention Center 

Online games have grown up, and as an 
industry we now have a great deal of 
collective experience. At the same time, 
interest in developing online games has never 
been higher. These roundtables provide a 
forum for industry veterans to share their 
experiences-good, bad, and ugly-while 
learning best practices and reaffirming or 
disproving the conventional wisdom that we 
are beginning to generate around online 
games. Does a 50-year-old housewife really 
play games? Does a persistent world equal a 
massively multiplayer game? Is customer 
service as important as everyone says it is? 
Does anyone care about online play on a 
console? And how much money do online 
games really make anyway? Get these 
answers, and many more, directly from the 
industry 



Takeaway: Members of the online games 
industry share their experiences, including 
successes, failures, surprises, and dispelled 
and/or confirmed conventional wisdom in a 
series of roundtables. Three roundtables are 
held, and focus on persistent worlds, casual 
games, and alternative platforms, including 
consoles and wireless/handheld devices. 
Participants learn what has worked and failed, 
how companies have been pleasantly 
surprised by unforeseen success and not-so- 
pleasantly surprised by unexpected disaster. 
Industry veterans share their experiences and 
opinions while learning best (and worst) 
practices from each other. Developers with 
interest in online games get a realistic look at 
what has and has not worked. 

Intended Audience: Anyone with experience 
or interest in the online games segment 
should attend. Experienced developers share 
their war stories and learn from each other; 
new participants can also learn from the 
successes and failures of industry veterans. 

Lecture - All - Expo Pass Session 
Pitching an Original IP: Notes from the Field 
Chris Charla See page 120 for bio 
Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 
Salon III, Marriott 

Getting the chance to develop an original IP 
into a game is the holy grail for the 
independent developer, as well as for many 
teams inside larger companies. Taking an 
original IP to market is the riskiest play a 
publisher can make, but the one with the 
greatest potential rewards. How can an 
independent developer, or a team inside a 
larger company successfully pitch an original 
IP, or totally new game style? Digital Eclipse 
has gained considerable experience since it 
first started showing an original game, and 
engine, behind closed doors, at last year's GDC. 
This one hour session shares some of the 
successes and failures the company has 
experienced over the past year, and in the 
process helps other developers, whether 
independent or part of a larger organization, 
understand what it takes to attempt to get 
funding for their original projects. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave with a better 
understanding of both the general things that 
they need to successfully present an original 
game idea, as well as the specific things that 
the top tier (and second tier) publishers are 
looking for today when evaluating an original 
IP (or, to a lesser extent, an original engine). 
Additionally, attendees leave with a good 
understanding of where their work pitching 



and developing an original IP will lead, even if 
their game doesn't get made, there could be 
beneficial outcomes (as there already have 
been for Digital Eclipse). 

Roundtable - All 

The Publisher's "Rules of Acquisition" 

Tom Buscaglia See page 120 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 

Pacific, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 

E, Convention Center 

Friday, March 26 • g-ioam 

E, Convention Center 

Game developers often have real problems 
dealing with publishers. One of the main 
reasons for many problems is an inability on 
the part of developers to understand the 
publisher's viewpoint because developers can 
not understand the publishers value system. 
This discussion group identify and discuss the 
publisher's "Rules of Acquisition" that guide 
their decision making process. 

These "Rules of Acquisition" are loosely based 
on those of the Ferengi race in the star Trek 
television series. The most successful traders 
in th known universe, every decision of a 
Ferengi is dictated by these rules since 
everything in the life of a Ferengi revolves 
around the acquisition of wealth. 

This entertaining and educational discussion 
starts with some "rules" that the presenter 
has developed in attempting to assist his 
developer clients in understanding the 
behavior of publishers. The discussion group 
with then work toward developing more Rules 
of Acquisition to help us understand why 
publishers do what they do. 

Takeaway: Attendees gain some insight into 
the mind set of a business person. They obtain 
a set of basic principles that often guide the 
publishers business decisions. Participants 
have an opportunity to contribute to a 
growing body on knowledge and help each 
other gain a better understanding of how to 
deal with their publishers. 

Intended Audience: Artists, designers, 
programmers and animators with a high 
artistic sensibility, but without any coherent 
business experience or motivation. Developers 
whpo have had difficulty in dealing with 
publishers and believe that it is because they 
know more about what they are doing than 
the publisher does. And anyone else who 
thinks that publishers just don't get it. 



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-56- 



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BUSINESS & LEGAL TRACK 



Lecture - All 

A Road Map for Peace: Redefining the Publisher-Developer 

Relationship 

Joe Minton & Jon Walsh See pages 73; & 139 for bios 

Friday, March 26 • 10:30-11:30301 

Bi, Convention Center 

The videogame industry should be enjoying golden days. Revenues are 
over $io billion a year and there is a greater mass market penetration of 
gaming than ever before. With all this industry success, why is it that 
the relationship between publishers and developers continues to be 
widely described as "adversarial"? 

Developers want to create great games, ensure their games get proper 
exposure and attention, keep their project pipelines full and build their 
studios. Publishers want to publish great games, manage financial risk 
on their development capital, strengthen retailer confidence in their 
products and keep their portfolios competitive. Both parties want to be 
financially rewarded for their efforts. 

This talk explores the idea that the interests of a publisher and a 
developer, while different, are largely complimentary and that it is 
possible to generate winning results for both parties by approaching the 
traditional publisher-developer relationship differently. 

Topics to be discussed include: 

- Clarifying and cultivating respect for the roles and interests of the 
developer and the publisher in game development and commercial 
exploitation 

- Synergistic communication and feedback channels 

- Studio planning in the context of these redefined relationships 

- Intellectual property ownership 

- Appropriate risk allocation and reward models 

Listen to the president of veteran developer Cyberlore Studios and the 
president of publisher Groove Games as they articulate this new view of 
relations based on partnership, project risk allocation and mutual long- 
term benefit. 

Takeaway: Uncovering the ways in which the underlying interests of a 
developer and a publisher are complimentary. Understanding the capital 
risk-allocation and reward model employed by publishers which drives 
their project funding decisions. The basic time, budget, and royalty 
mechanics of a sample publishing deal using this approach. 

Intended Audience: This presentation is intended for game publishers 
and developers of all levels of sophistication, from start-ups to veterans. 

Round-table - Beginner 

Secrets of Successful Indie Developers 

Steve Pavlina See page 133 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 

L, Convention Center 

Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 

E, Convention Center 

Friday, March 26 • 4-spm 

E, Convention Center 

What does it take to succeed as an independent game developer? Is it 
possible to make a decent living creating and selling your own games 
via online distribution and shareware channels? The answer is a 



definitive yes. Many so-called "indie" developers are making over 
$100,000 annually writing and selling their own games over the 
internet. In 2001 both the New York Times and Time Magazine ran 
separate stories that shed some light on these previously unnoticed 
internet profiteers. The shareware market has changed radically in just 
the past 2-3 years, making it easier than ever to sell your own games 
with virtually no marketing budget required. If you are already selling 
your own games or are thinking about doing so, then join us in this 
session to trade tips and share success stories. We'll discuss what works 
and doesn't work in the indie scene, including low-budget marketing 
techniques, distribution methods, third-party licensing, and more. Let's 
learn from each other by pooling our experiences and resources. 

Takeaway: Attendees specifically learn what it takes to succeed as an 
independent game developer, including how to make a profit selling sell 
their own games online. This includes learning what types of products 
are most likely to succeed, effective low-cost guerilla marketing 
strategies, licensing opportunities, web site design, distribution 
methods, and more. 

Attendees considering going independent gain a solid understanding of 
the skills needed, and those who are already selling online take home 
many new ideas they can use to increase their sales. Dozens of specific 
resources are provided, including low-budget marketing services, 
automated order processing systems, key distribution opportunities, and 
development resources. 

Lecture - All 

Spare No Expense: Starbucks and Aeron Chairs for Everyone 

Mike McShaffry See page 131 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 4-5pm 

Bi, Convention Center 

Game development budgets and studio budgets are much more 
complicated than a simple multiplication of person-months and average 
salary. If your studio has any dream of making a profit, you must 
consider extra costs for administration, office space, utilities, capital 
expenditures, and idle time. This presentation takes you through the 
actual expenditures of a 20-person game studio and shows you how to 
predict and control studio costs, and how to make the right choices to 
prevent turning your workplace into a gulag. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn what a small studio might spend its money 
on, strategies to control those expenditures, and the best way to present 
project cost info to producers, publishers and investors. 

Panel - Advanced 

Starting a New Studio 

Erik Bethke, Alex Garden, Demis Hassabis, Rob Huebner, Mike Kulas, 

Lewis Petersen See pages nj-i4i for bios 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

A2, Convention Center 

Starting a brand new studio is one of the most complex and risky 
endeavors in most developers' careers. Even with years of industry 
experience, there are hundreds of small details that you probably don't 
know about the process, any one of which could spell the difference 
between failure or riches. 

This panel brings together studio founders from a wide variety of 
companies. Some have started a company and failed, others have 
thrived, still others had their companies purchased or split. One even 



-57- 



BUSINESS & LEGAL TRACK 



moved his company to the other side of the 
world. Each studio has its own story, and each 
story has important lessons for those 
considering following in their footsteps. The 
moderator asks the hard questions, gets the 
straight answers, and makes sure the 
audience gets a chance to get the information 
the books and magazines won't tell you. 

Panel - All 

The State of the Web Downloadable 

Games Industry: A 2004 IGDA Online Games 

White Paper 

Steven DeBenedictis, Greg Mills, Derrick 

Morton, Andrew Phelps, Wade Tinney, John 

Welch See pages 117-141 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 

B2, Convention Center 

The IGDA Online Games Committee, now in its 
third year, is releasing three free white papers 
at GDC 2004. Each is an exploration of the 
online games business as it relates to a core 
product area where independent developers 
are making interesting investments and/or 
revenues: 

- Web/downloadable games 

- Persistent world games 

- Mobile games 

The presentation is focused on the 
web/downloadable games topic, consisting of 
panel lecture and O&A. Content of the presen- 
tation is not focused on pure business, but is 
from the business perspective. For example, 
the presentation addresses what technologies 
are practical, what designs lead to sellable 
games, and what production techniques are 
used by leading developers to make their 
businesses run more efficiently. 

Takeaway: Attendees at this session learn 
about the business, production, and technical 
issues faced in online game development and 
how experienced developers and distributors 
have approached those issues successfully, or 
not so successfully. 

Intended Audience: The audience for this 
presentation is composed of business leaders 
and production and technical management of 
current or future online game developers as 
well as management from companies 
interested in learning how they can become 
involved in online game distribution. People 
attend this session to gain valuable insight 
into areas where strategic game development 
and distribution decisions will be made and to 
have the opportunity to meet, debate, and 
learn from leaders in the online games 
industry. 



Lecture - Intermediate 

Storytellers vs. Puzzle-Makers: New Traits 

of Successful Games 

Kevin Bachus See page nj for bio 

Friday, March 26th • 4-5pm 

Fi, Convention Center 

The next few years are going to be 
treacherous for those of us tasked with 
uncovering the next blockbuster hit. The old 
rules that dictate what makes a sure-fire hit 
no longer seem to apply as consumers' 
expectations continue to leapfrog the 
capabilities of our industry's talent pool. What 
are we to do when the games that sell best 
seem to have almost nothing in common? Are 
we out of touch with our customers, or is 
there an even deeper, more troubling 
challenge ahead? If you're a publisher, how do 
you make and justify better product 
acquisition decisions? If you're a developer, 
how can you position your concept and 
capabilities to meet the publishers' ever- 
increasing demands? And where do IP 
licensors fit into the mix? This session 
combines specific examples of the latest 
trends, explore the concepts that worked and 
those that didn't, and provide specific 
guidelines that can be used immediately to 
navigate through the coming storm. 

Lecture - Beginner 

Understanding the Elements of Employee 

Compensation 

Peter H. Friedman See page 723 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 

Salon III, Marriott 

Who is an employee? What are typical 
employee benefits? Why is there an ongoing 
debate about stock options? How do 
companies deduct fringe benefits and when? 
Answers to the above questions and your own 
issues to be discussed. 

Takeaway: The primary ideas that are taken 
away from this section is who is an employee 
and who is an independent contractor, what 
are the employer obligations to either one of 
them, what are fringe benefits and how are 
they taxed, and finally the controversy over 
incentive stock options. 

Lecture - All 

The Well-Fed Freelancer: A Survival Guide 

in 24 Easy Lessons 

Francois Dominic Laramee See page 129 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 

A7, Convention Center 

While business opportunities for freelancers in 
the game industry have grown by leaps and 



bounds over the past few years, actually 
making a living as a full-time freelancer still 
requires a great deal of preparation and 
effective strategy. 

This presentation discusses the tricks and 
techniques developed by the speaker over six 
years of successful (albeit occasionally 
stressful) freelancing experience. Topics to be 
discussed include prioritizing, self-marketing, 
managing the freelancer's finances, and 
acclimatizing oneself to the realities of the 
freelancing market. 

Takeaway: How to decide what services you 
sell, and to whom. How to protect your 
financial security despite the lack of regular 
paychecks. How to maximize the return on 
your marketing effort. How to avoid the 
pitfalls associated with a home-based 
business, especially the temptation of procras- 
tination. 

Intended Audience: Practicing freelancers 
eager to enhance their business, as well as all 
developers who are considering a switch to 
the freelance lifestyle. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

What to Do When it All Goes to Hell: 

Lessons Learned Shutting Down a Game 

Studio 

James Gwertzman See page 725 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 

A7, Convention Center 

Escape Factory, Ltd., opened its doors in 2000, 
and closed three years later in 2003. They had 
everything going for them: money in the bank, 
incubation with Valve, passionate and 
talented employees, and a multi-millon dollar 
PS2 and Xbox development deal signed within 
their first year. So what happened? 

This talk analyzes and dissects their failure 
and highlight extremely valuable lessons that 
they figured out hard way. They learned more 
in the six months it took to take Escape 
Factory apart than in the 2.5 years they spent 
putting it together in the first place, especially 
since in their case the most fatal mistakes 
were made after their first game was 
cancelled. 

The video game industry is incredibly 
competitive with razor-thin profit-margins for 
all but the most successful studios. Learn from 
their mistakes so you won't make them 
yourself. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn key mistakes to 
avoid both on the way up and on the way 



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-58- 



WWW 



gdconf. 



com 



BUSINESS & LEGAL TRACK 



down. Attendees also walk away with an understanding for what 
problem situations feel like "in the moment." Anyone can diagnose 
problems after the fact, but what are the signs of a trainwreck as it's 
happening and what can you do right then and there to prevent it? 

Intended Audience: This talk benefits anyone thinking about founding a 
new game studio or in a position of responsibility at an existing one. 

Roundtable - All 

You Have Built a Successful Game Development Business: Now How 

do You Sell It? 

Paul Heydon See page 126 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:303:30pm 

Pacific, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

Pacific, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 

E, Convention Center 

Many game developers build up successful businesses but do not realise 
good value for the business when they go to sell it. By preparing in 
advance, a game developer can sell their company for a strong price. This 



roundtable will include various people who have sold a video game 
developer and will use their experiences to talk about the key issues to 
consider when thinking about selling your business. Strategic 
partnerships could make a world of difference which is why it is 
important to work with more than one publisher but also the types of 
publishers whom would be best to buy your business someday. The 
other key issue is to have a good advisor, be it a lawyer or banker, who 
can provide you with good professional advice to ensure that you 
achieve as as good a deal as possible. Other issues that are covered 
include: recent M&A deals in the sector and implications, valuations of 
public game companies and implications, key legal issues, negotiations 
and timing. 

Takeaway: People learn the key things they need to know in getting 
ready to sell their business and how to go about it. They also learn how 
to work out potential valuations for their business, how to select an 
advisor, negotiation skills and timing issues. 

Intended Audience: This session would benefit all game developers be it 
start-ups or experienced. Ideally someday, most developers would like to 
sell their business to realise value for their efforts and also for their 
investors. 




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Entertainment Experience First, Videogame Second: 
The Making of The Return of the King 



Neil Young 

Wednesday, March 24 « 
A3, Convention Center 



2:30-3:30pm 



As the videogame medium matures and its audience broadens, so the need to create more powerful 
and compelling entertainment experiences grows. From art game to blockbuster, the values that we 
strive to infuse into our products now mirror and approach those of other dominant entertainment 
forms, but with the added complexity inherent in interactivity. 

At one end of this spectrum is the blockbuster, whether original or adapted. A strong game delivered 
at the right moment has the potential to touch many millions and to generate revenues in the same 
league as hit films. Like its blockbuster film counterpart, its visibility alone has the potential to make 
or break careers and companies. It involves the highest of high stakes game design. How can game 
developers craft experiences with entertainment and production values that match blockbuster 
films without getting sucked into death spirals of unmanageable teams, diluted game designs, or 
never-ending product cycles? 

Using The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King as a backdrop, this session reviews the team's 
learning experience regarding how to approach the task of adaptation, idea management through a 
large scale team, the shape of the game's design, and how innovation, content, and features can be 
balanced with schedule management to avoid compromising any of them. 

Intended Audience: Attendees leave this session with key concepts and insights as to how they can 
craft products that deliver, first and foremost, an entertainment experience. 



Neil Young 

Neil Young is the vice president and executive in charge of production at Electronic Arts and is currently 
leading development on The Lord of the Rings games based on the New Line Cinema license. British- 
born Neil joined the staff at Probe Software in 1990, working on a wide variety of titles for Acclaim, 
Sega, Hudson, USGold and Virgin Interactive. Neil moved to the United States, where he went to join 
Virgin Interactive, where he produced Disney's Aladdin, Jungle Book, Toonstruck, 11th Hour, among 
many others. He was promoted to vice president for Product Development. In April of 1997, Neil was 
named vice president and general manager of ORIGIN Systems, a subsidiary of Electronic Arts based in 
Austin, Texas. During this time, Young supervised the launch of the highly successful Ultima Online. In 
1999, Neil left ORIGIN to become vice president and executive in charge of production at Electronic 
Arts, where he founded Synthetic. With Synthetic, Neil was the creator and driving force behind 
Majestic, the first Internet-based interactive game. 



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-60- 



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GAME DESIGN TRACK 




Creating compelling, immersive games requires understanding, visualizing, demonstrating and 
tuning the interactions of an ever-increasing number of game tools and systems. While game 
designers need to understand and exploit the possibilities of new technologies such as realistic 
physics, facial expressions and lighting techniques, they must also continue to master the 
traditional disciplines of drama, gameplay and psychology. Choosing a focus, balancing the 
elements and forging a complete experience is the designer's role. The Game Design Track 
explores the challenges and ramifications of the interaction between new technologies and 
established techniques. 



Lecture - Intermediate 
Adventures in Character Design 
Tim Schafer See page 136 for bio 
Thursday, March 25 • 4:15-5:^01 
J3, Convention Center 

To create a truly immersive game experience with a compelling fantasy 
world, you have to populate that world with real characters. Not just 
characters that behave realistically on the screen, but characters that 
ARE real to you, the game's creator. The more you know your own 
characters, the more real they will become, and the more they will help 
draw the player into your game's imaginary word. It's not enough for 
your characters to have distinctive speech patterns and tics. They need 
actual histories, motives, dreams, and secrets. Then they will have real 
depth with which pull the player in, and your fantasy world will be come 
a real place that the player loves to visit, and can't wait to get back to 
when they leave. 

Takeaway: This session explores techniques to get to know your own 
characters, and help bring them to life. Examples are drawn from Tim's 
past games (Day of the Tentacle, Full Throttle, Grim Fandango) as 
well as his current project, the upcoming Xbox game Psychonauts. 

Lecture - Beginner 
Anatomy of a 2D Side-Scroller 
Luis Barriga See page n8for bio 
Friday, March 26 • 4~5pm 
J3, Convention Center 

With the advent and proliferation of the Gameboy Advance, web-based 
entertainment and numerous game-friendly cell phones over the last 
few years, 2D game development has become a sizeable sector of the 
gaming industry. This lecture presents and analyzes the fundamentals of 
a genre that dominated the market back in the days of 8-bit and 16-bit 
consoles and is enjoying a revival: the character based 2D side-scroller. 

The classics of this popular genre wrote many of the rules that are now 
applied to games in general, thus a dissection and analysis of their 
elements and nuances will be of interest to the majority of game 
designers in general and 2D game designers in particular. Starting off 
with characters and their action sets, the lecture then covers the topics 
of environments, encounters, and levels with a good amount of detail. 

Takeaway: No one learns quantum physics without Newtonian physics, 
and most literature majors read a large number of the classics. If 
videogame design is to be regarded as a serious area of human 



expertise one must analyze and learn from what others achieved earlier. 
Attendees become familiar with the principles that built the character- 
based interactive experience in the form of side-scrollers and learn 
general applications of these principles both to 2D and 3D. 

Intended Audience: This lecture is aimed at designers who have an 
interest in 2D side-scrollers, revisiting gameplay fundamentals, or 
enriching their 3D game with tried and true techniques. 

Panel - Beginner 

ArtModJam 

Peter Brinson, Mike Caloud, Mary Flanagan, Sky Frostenson, Robert 

Nideffer, Celia Pearce, Eddo Stern See pages 117-141 for bios 

Friday, March 26 • 9-io:3oam 

A7, Convention Center 

Empowered by the increasing proliferation of moddable game engines, 
and incubating within a petri dish of open-source and modding culture, 
a new generation of artists are using game modificaiton as an artistic 
practice. These artists use techniques of skinning, patching, and 
modding to create a wide array of interactive art works, framed as 
performance, virtual installation, or"machinima" (films made'on 
location" within video games.) These works can be seen on web archives, 
in raves, galleries and art events, and even in museums. The ArtModJam 
at GDC will be a fast-paced event showcasing live demonstrations of 
some of the most interesting, original, controversial and enteraining 
examples of this emerging art form. 

Takeaway: This session can be seen as a compliment to the experi- 
mental game workshop in that it introduces participants to new 
applications of game technology and culture, new genres and ideas. It 
also provides insight for those interested in game fan culture, and 
developing modding tools and products targeted at the modding 
community. 

Intended Audience: This session is targeted at game designers and 
artists, as well as developers who are interested in trends in game 
modding and fan culture, and those who service fan-based modding 
communities. It will also be of interest to students of game design, 
educators and researchers. 

Lecture - All 
Behavioral Game Design 
John Hopson See page 126 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 
A6, Convention Center 




GAME DESIGN TRACK 



Behavioral psychology offers an objective set 
of tools by which to understand and predict 
player reactions to game designs. By 
understanding what our game designs ask of 
our players, we can ensure that we choose an 
effective game design for any given circum- 
stance. What is being offered here is not a 
blueprint for perfect games, it is a primer to 
some of the basic ways people react to 
different patterns of rewards. Every computer 
game is implicitly asking its players to react in 
certain ways. Psychology can offer a 
framework and a vocabulary for 
understanding what we are already telling our 
players. 

Takeaway: Attendees take away a basic 
understanding of how players react to the 
major types of reward structures and have 
simple guidelines for bringing out the kinds of 
player behavior they want. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Beyond Fun: Setting Aesthetic Goals & 

Sticking to Them 

Craig Derrick & Tim Stellmach 

See pages 122 & 138 for bios 
Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 
Ji, Convention Center 

Many people say the "fun factor" is the most 
important thing in game design. The problem 
is that saying it doesn't keep you from getting 
into the mid-project doldrums and wondering 
just what is supposed to be fun about this 
thing anyway. If Quake is "fun," and Animal 
Crossing is also "fun," then where does that 
leave a designer trying to communicate his 
vision to a producer, reviewer, or teammate? 

This session presents aesthetic goals as a 
design tool. It surveys different means of 
categorizing entertainment values, and 
demonstrates how to apply these critical 
frames to game design. The presentation 
discusses how to analyze entertainment 
value, formulate design goals, and to get from 
aesthetic to functional requirements. It 
focuses on work processes that the designer 
can use to identify what must be done and 
what might go wrong in realizing his vision. 
Case studies include Thief, Crash Nitro Kart, 
and others. 

Takeaway: Design is an intentional process, 
requiring setting and pursuit of goals. 
Formulating useful entertainment goals 
requires more specific quality descriptors than 
"fun." Various formulations exist of specific 
types of fun, each with its own perspective. 
While analogy to existing games provides a 



goal formulation, by itself it limits the 
designer to imitation. Good work processes 
can help ensure that teams meet a project's 
entertainment goals. 

Intended Audience: The session is directed at 
game designers and project managers seeking 
ways to understand the creative process, or 
understand how there can even be a process 
when it comes to creativity. Attendees should 
have a broad knowledge of game genres, and 
genera! familiarity with game development. 
Basic knowledge of critical theory of games 
may be helpful but is not necessary. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The Civilization Series: How to Maintain a 

Successful Franchise 

Soren Johnson See page 127 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 

J3, Convention Center 

Creating a franchise is the often elusive goal 
of many publishers and developers. The dream 
is achieving regular profits with minimal risk 
built off a loyal following. Although much 
attention has been given to the difficulty of 
creating a franchise, maintaining one is a 
separate, and often equally formidable, 
challenge. How should the design balance 
improving accessibility (for the newcomers) 
with increasing depth (for the veterans)? What 
are the core elements of the design which 
reflect your franchise's identity? How much 
should one listen to the vocal, dedicated fan- 
base? Can one (and should one) count on their 
loyalty? Is it ever appropriate to expand the 
franchise into a new genre? 

To answer these difficult questions, this 
lecture analyzes how the developers of the 
Civilization series have maintained their 
franchise's success through four major 
versions of the game. Using Civilization III as 
a case study, the challenges and trade-offs of 
designing within a gaming tradition become 
apparent. Accordingly, a general set of rules to 
follow, and pitfalls to avoid, are identified to 
help designers keep their own franchises 
thriving. Finally, the lecture discusses how 
these practices apply to the upcoming 
development of Civilization IV. 

Takeaway: Attendees gain an understanding 
of the tensions inherent in designing for a 
successful franchise, with a focus on balancing 
the needs of the series veteran with those of 
the newcomer. Also, the talk emphasizes that 
adding new game features must be balanced 
with removing or simplifying old ones to 
prevent the franchise from growing too 



complex. If the manual starts getting bigger, 
the audience starts getting smaller. 

Intended Audience: This lecture is open to 
anyone interested in designing a successful 
new game within a well-established franchise. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 

The Challenge for New Ideas in Online 

Console Gaming 

Shekhar Dhupelia See page 122 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 

Plaza, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

Santa Clara II, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 

Plaza, Hilton 

Console Gaming has taken hold, and the 
number of people playing continues to grow 
with each online console release. However, 
with the increasing developer use of "third- 
party platforms" and "cross-platform API's", 
there has come a disturbing trend - a lack of 
innovation. This roundtable is a study of the 
latest innovators in the genre, as well as 
what's just over the horizon. 

Takeaway: The best and brightest ideas to- 
date in online console games, and how they've 
pushed the envelope. Ideas to minimize 
testing time and cost with new online 
designs. Techniques on how to structure very 
simple online gameplay mechanincs, so as to 
foster a new online community and give the 
game that all-fabled "stickiness". 

Sponsored by Softimage 
Creating Characters, Models & 
Environments for Half-Life 2 
Michael Isner & John Morello 

See pages 127 & 737 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 
g-ioam • 12-ipm • 4-5pm • 5:30-6:3opm 
Ai, Convention Center 

Get up to speed on Half-Life 2 and Source 
Engine development with this rolling 1 -hour 
training session, repeated 4 times during 
the day. 

This session covers the entire character 
creation and build process, from choreography 
and character layout using the dedicated Valve 
Source Engine tools, to the deployment of the 
resulting character in a sample environment. 

Learn how to make and animate high-quality 
Half-Life 2 characters with the free 3-D art 
environment, SOFIMAGE|XSI EXP for Half-Life 
2. Instruction will include modeling, texturing, 



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GAME DESIGN TRACK 



enveloping, animation, and the all-important export pipeline. 

Takeaway: A working knowledge of how to model, texture, animate and 
export models and characters for Half-Life 2, including an 
understanding of Valve's Source Engine content creation pipeline, and 
techniques for using the free SOFTIMAGE|XSI EXP for Half-Life 2. 

Intended Audience: This session is for any artist or developer that is 
interested in modding Half-Life 2, building games atop Valve's Source 
Engine or simply understanding the content creation techniques and 
processes behind this extraordinary game and game engine. Basic 3D 
content creation experience required, intermediate skills recommended. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Creating the Right Mix of Static Versus Dynamic Content in a 

Massively Multiplayer Game 

Rich Vogel See page ijgfor bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 

A2, Convention Center 

The challenges for developing MMOG content are huge. Unlike single 
player games where you have on average 40 -60 hours of game play for 
one person, MMOG need on the order of 3 to 6 months of content to 
support several thousand players. The average MMOG takes three years 
to develop with teams up to 65 plus people. Every year the bar gets set 
higher and higher. 

This session delves into the design challenges of building content for 
MMOG. There are many different approaches ranging from a total 
sandbox (dynamic) to totally handcrafted content (static). What are the 
right choices? Is there a good mix of the two? Should you do one and 
not the other or both? What is the right level of content? Where's the 
bar today and where will it be in two years? What are the design consid- 
erations for each approach? What works and what fails? 

This lecture talks about the design considerations for each approach and 
answer the above questions as well as the pros and cons of each 
method. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn the different design approaches to 
developing each type of content. The goal here is give designers a good 
overview of each approach in order for them to determine the right mix 
of content for their game. 

Intended Audience: This is an intermediate design lecture intended for 
the designer and producer of online worlds. 

Lecture - All 

Cross Platform User Interface Development 

Rob Caminos & Tim Stellmach 

See pages 120 & 138 for bios 
Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 
A7, Convention Center 

"Poorly designed objects can be difficult and frustrating to use. They 
provide no clues or sometimes false clues. They trap the user and thwart 
the normal process of interpretation and understanding. Alas, poor design 
predominates." - Donald A. Norman, The Design of Everyday Things 

While Ul is often the last thing a developer thinks about designing, it is 
always the first thing a player will see before playing the game. There 
are gamers out there who won't even play a game if the Ul doesn't 



make sense or is too frustrating to navigate. So what are the elements 
that make a user interface good or bad? How do you get a great looking 
Ul with minimal resources? How do you make a Ul that will work for all 
platforms and multiple languages? How does Ul on a console differ from 
the PC? This session covers user interface development and various 
methods used to address these challenges. 

The case studies for this topic are Vicarious Visions' Crash Nitro Kart 
(PS2, Xbox, GCN, and GBA), Jedi Knight: Jedi Academy (Xbox), Retro 
Studio's Metroid Prime (GCN), Bungie's Halo (Xbox), and EA Sports 
BIG's SSX Tricky (PS2).The focus of this session are general rules for Ul 
design on a visual and cognitive level, cross-platform considerations, 
localization considerations, outlining console related issues with Ul, and 
bringing the Ul of a PC title to the console. 

In addition the presenters examine excerpts from the Donald A. Norman 
book The Design of Everyday Things and how they apply to User Interface 
design, and present a brief postmortem of G.U.I. DO., a proprietary 
scripting language developed for User Interface implementation. 

Takeaway: The takeaway of the presentation are an outline of general Ul 
development practices that will make console Ul development faster 
and easier. Applying principles from The Design of Everyday Things to Ul 
design. Techniques for easier localization. Examples of various kinds Ul 
designs and techniques for T.R.C. compliance across all platforms. 

Lecture - Beginner 

Designing Games for Coin-Op and Internet Gambling 

Andrew Mound See page 737 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 121pm 

Salon III, Marriott 

As an industry, gambling games financially dwarf virtually every other 
kind of entertainment. Pachinko, for example, experiences $250 billion in 
sales per year. This is double the size of the Japanese auto industry. 

The designs for these games generally begin on a spreadsheet, rather 
than a storyboard. And their play times are often measured in seconds, 
rather than minutes. Unlike console and arcade games, gambling games 
can literally change a player's day, week, month, or life. 

This presentation gives an overview of the different generes of gambling 
games offered around the world in both physical and internet versions. 
It also explains the psychology behind creating a paytable, and how that 
paytable can be married to a game's interface and visual elements. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn about the different game genres available 
worldwide (AWP, Pachinko, Australian-style, etc.), and the process that is 
required to create mathematically viable versions of these games. 
Localization issues, such as reglations and game personality is also 
explained. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Entering the World: Cognitive Dissonance and Immersion in 

Electronic Games 

Hal Barwood See page u for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 

J3, Convention Center 

Much of life and all of art is marked by the differential processing of 
contradictory inputs, cognitive dissonance. Think of a dinner roast made 
from a slaughtered animal; think hot headlines and cold history; think 



GAME DESIGN TRACK 



movies flowing from hundreds of separate 
shots; think games made from puppets, 
snippets of geometry, hit points, interfaces, 
and artificial boundaries. How do human 
beings make sense of an entertaining 
experience, let alone enjoy it? Coleridge's 
"willing suspension of disbelief" is the 
everyday answer. A question for game 
designers is: how can we encourage the 
process? Are there lessons to be found in the 
allied arts? Or must developers rely on 
manipulating features unique to games? This 
talk imagines that immersion is an important 
goal of design, that cognitive dissonance is an 
important barrier, and explores the 
consequences. 

Takeaway: Attendees catch a glimpse of the 
phenomenology of games, how they exist as 
collections of disparate elements, how the 
elements conflict with each other, and how 
the human psyche knits the elements 
together. With this information and the 
accompanying discussion, they should begin 
to recognize some of the major issues in 
designing immersive games. 

Intended Audience: This is a session for 
working game designers who like to analyze 
what they do. No special knowledge is 
necessary, although the topic is philosophical 
in nature. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The Evolution of a Franchise: The Legend of 

Zelda 

Eiji Aonuma See page 117 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 

J3, Convention Center 

From the introduction of the original The 
Legend of Zelda in 1986 to the graphic design 
of 2002's eel-shaded The Legend of Zelda:The 
Wind Waker, The Legend of Zelda series has 
undergone many significant changes over the 
years. Some modifications were accelerated by 
technological improvements and others 
stemmed from the desire to adjust theme or 
graphic representation. Eiji addresses the 
challenges faced by Nintendo's development 
teams while creating The Legend of Zelda: 
Ocarina of Time, The Legend of Zelda-. 
Majora's Mask, and The Legend of Zelda:The 
Wind Waker, and how decisions were made 
to innovate, while maintaining the fun and 
integrity of this storied franchise. 

<i» This lecture is simultaneously translated. 
Please arrive early to pick up your headset. 



Lecture - All 

Experimental Gameplay Workshop 

Jonathan Blow See page ngfor bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-6pm 

J2, Convention Center 

This workshop provides a platform for 
designers to showcase their risky new work. 
Each designer gives a dense 15-minute presen- 
tation, illustrating how their new game design 
is different from what has come before, and 
explaining what they hope to achieve through 
this experimentation. 

By explicitly acknowledging the existence of a 
community of experimental game designers; 
the objective is to legitimize gameplay- 
oriented research and development. 

Takeaway: Game design can be a field of 
newness and excitement. 

Intended Audience: Game designers, people 
interested in being game designers, and 
people interested in new and creative 
gameplay ideas. No other prerequisites are 
necessary. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Four at a Time: Techniques for Maximizing 

Enemy and Object Placement 

Chris Cross See page 121 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • i2-ipm 

A3, Convention Center 

Game design for consoles is always a balance 
between features and limitations. There are 
many ways to try and take advantages of the 
hardware at hand, but ultimately the final 
battle versus these limitations that take place 
during the implementation of Levels, specif- 
ically NPC and Object placement and 
management. The lecture touches lightly on 
some of the Design Philosophies utilized 
during the development of the console Medal 
of Honor titles. 

The title "Four at a Time" refers to the amount 
of NPCs that could be active at one time in 
original PlayStation version of Medal of 
Honor and Medal of Honor: Underground. 
The limitations were so extreme this talk is 
tailored towards those tools, trials and 
workarounds and specific techniques. Also, the 
lecture illustrates the transition to the PS2 and 
how that affected our approach. The goal of 
the lecture is to be able to takeaway 
techniques that you can apply in your own 
projects, regardless of genre, and at least a 
new way of looking at the problems and 
solutions for some of the limitations put on 
NPC and Object placement. Interactive worlds 



are becoming increasingly complex with some 
of these techniques you should be able to turn 
technology limitations into strengths both for 
the end product and implementation method- 
ologies. 

Lecture - All 

14 Ways of Drawing Players in with an 

Opening Cinematic 

David Freeman See page 123 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 

Ji, Convention Center 

Not all games use pre-rendered cinematics, 
and even those that do sometimes don't have 
one at the start. But the opening cinematic 
convention is still the choice solution for many 
games. Because pre-rendered cinematics are, 
in effect, short films, there are some hot tips 
which can be drawn by studying the opening 
few minutes of successful theatrical films. This 
discussion presents 14 distinct ways of using 
an opening cinematic making players 
spellbound and eager to keep going, dying to 
learn where the game will take them. 
Attendees learn these techniques in this 
dynamic workshop by game designer and 
writer David Freeman. Video clips help 
demonstrate these powerful techniques in 
action. 

Takeaway: Attendees come away with a 
wealth of new techniques for making an 
opening cinematic captivate players and get 
them excited about plunging into a game. 

Lecture - All 

From Script to Joystick: World-Building 101 

E. Daniel Arey & Bob Rafei 

See pages 117 & 134 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6.'3opm 
A2, Convention Center 

Jak II, the sequel to the best selling Jak and 
Daxter:The Precursor Legacy, represents 
over two years of intense design and 
production work. Naughty Dog's goal for this 
product was to bring story based gaming into 
the action platform genre as never before, in 
other words, to make the world, characters, 
and story more than just a mere backdrop to 
the action. To achieve this lofty goal, it was 
essential that Naughty Dog's design and art 
teams work closer together than ever to 
develop new process controls designed to 
keep the look and feel cohesive and true to 
the story vision across the entire play 
experience.With Jak N's 90 minutes of 
cinematics, detailed 10,000+ polygon 
character models, active living city, and a 
massive world three times the size of the first 



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GAME DESIGN TRACK 



game, Jak II quickly became a huge logistical and production design 
challenge. This session details the processes used to create and 
complete Jak II, defining lessons learned, tools required, and 
improvements made during the incredible and fulfilling journey from 
script to joystick. 

Takeaway: This lecture takes the you through Naughty Dog's art and 
design process of world, character, and game design creation. Attendees 
get a glimpse of the creative Naughty Dog style, and how the Jak II 
story, look, and gameplay were created nearly simultaneously to link the 
entire experience. Special focus is on the difficult process of marrying 
epic story to action platform gameplay, and how to keep it scalable 
under tough deadlines and constraints. 

Intended Audience: This lecture is intended for all levels of game design 
experience, but most benefit designers and artists looking for tools, 
experienced examples, and processes to help create and track large scale 
asset development merging story with gameplay. 

Panel - All - Expo Pass Session 
Came Design Challenge: The Love Story 
Raph Koster, Warren Spector, Will Wright, Eric Zimmerman 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 
A3, Convention Center 

What would happen if commercial constrains were removed the from 
the game design process? What if developers were free to create games 
that were radically experimental? How would designers react if they 
were confronted with some of the great unsolved game design 
problems? In the Game Design Challenge, you get to see how game 
design veterans answer these questions. 

A few months before the GDC, the panelists in the Game Design 
Challenge were given a design problem: come up with a concept for a 
game that tells a love story. At the Game Design Challenge session, they 
each present their solution. Each love story game concept offers a very 
different approach to this particular game design challenge, and each 
has been conceived for different gaming platform. In addition to 
presenting their game concepts, the panelists are able to critique each 
others' work and the audience is also be encouraged to join in the 
critical discussion as well. 

More than just a design exercise, the Game Design Challenge asks 
expert game designers to think on their feet as they address important 
game design problems. Their answers to the challenge just might 
contain the seeds of gaming's future. Expect an unpredictable session of 
innovative and unusual game design ideas along with free-wheeling 
dialogue and debate. 

Takeaway: Each game concept that the panelists present is a "snapshot" 
of the early game design process. In this way, the audience get a glimpse 
of how game designers formulate game concepts and begin to sketch 
them out into a full-fledged design. Critique, discussion, and debate is 
also an important part of concept development, and there is plenty of 
critical feedback among the panelists as well. Attendees will get a 
glimpse into some very original thinking about how to solve difficult 
game design problems. 

Intended Audience: This session is intended for game designers, project 
leaders, and others involved in the conceptual aspects of game design 
and game development. Anyone interested in new ideas and out-of-the- 



ordinary game designs is encouraged to attend. Bring an open mind and 
an interest in hearing unusual approaches to game design from some of 
the most established designers in the industry. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Came Design Methods of ICO 

Kenji Kaido & Fumito Ueda See pages 127 & 139 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 

J3, Convention Center 

Strikingly original titles don't happen by accident. Ico's creators set out 
with a deliberate plan to make a game that would instantly differentiate 
itself from other title: they wanted to create graphics that were 
beautiful, not just artificial or gorgeous by paying attention to detail, 
density, and reality. Throughout Ico's production, Fumito and Kenji did 
special attention to the cost/benefit analysis and a "minus design" 
philosophy to stand out Ico from overwhelming other existing titles. In 
this session, Fumito and Kenji explain how they created this innovative 
title giving the explanation of the product process. Fumito and Kenji 
also open some techniques for the game design and concept, and visual 
effects. 

••' This lecture is simultaneously translated. Please arrive early to pick up 
your headset. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Came Design: Risk and Return 
Masahiro Sakurai See page 13s for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • i2-ipm 
J3, Convention Center 

There is always an element of risk in trying to determine what is "fun" 
for a player. Although some try to apply a single theory of game design 
to reduce that risk overall, the presenter sees each game as an individual 
opportunity to define game payability. The presenter elaborates on 
design risks and returns from his own experiences designing the Kirby 
and Smash Brothers games for Nintendo. 

♦•» This lecture is simultaneously translated. Please arrive early to pick up 
your headset. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 

Came Designers and Development Teams 

David Wessman See page 140 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 

Pacific, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • 3~4pm 

Pacific, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 

Plaza, Hilton 

This session explores how game designers fit into the development 
team. We discuss the working relationships between game designers 
and artists, programmers, audio designers, testers, marketing, the 
publisher, and so on. Non-designers are especially encouraged to attend 

- previous sessions have shown their contributions to be extremely 
valuable! Specific topics include: 

- Who "owns" the design? And whose "vision" are you trying to realize? 

- What motivates the individual versus what motivates the team? 

- Understanding the technology, working within the limits or pushing 
them? 






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GAME DESIGN TRACK 



- Getting the assets you need when your 
design depends on others for implemen- 
tation. 

- As an iterative process, how can game design 
be done as efficiently as possible? 

- What about tools? It's been said that the 
better the tools, the better the game, but 
why? 

- Overcoming egos (your own and everyone 
else's.) 

Takeaway: Game design is a collaborative art 
that relies on everyone on the team 
understanding their roles and how they fit 
together. Effective teamwork depends on good 
communication and a shared vision. Each 
session's participants offer new and different 
ideas and solutions. 

Intended Audience: This session is for game 
designers and would-be game designers, and 
especially for those who work with them. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Game Narrative: What Would Aristotle Do? 

Warren Spector See page 137 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 3~4pm 

A6, Convention Center 

There's no shortage of games that don't even 
pretend to tell a story, in the traditional sense 
of the word. However, as we move more and 
more into the mainstream of media, from a 
business/audience standpoint, and as games 
come to look more and more like movies (or 
like the real world!), the importance of 
narrative seems clearly to be growing. Gamers 
seem more and more insistent that games 
involve them as deeply, and often in the same 
ways, movies do. And developers, whose 
rallying cry has always been "Interactivity! It's 
all about Interactivity!" seem bent on making 
games more story-driven, which means, 
almost by definition, less interactive. 

5b it behooves us to look at traditional 
narrative forms to see what we can crib from 
them. More important, though, it seems 
necessary that we examine the ways in which 
such cribbing really does represent dangerous, 
retrograde movement. We have to ask 
ourselves, "Can we craft interesting game 
stories without sacrificing interaction and 
falling back on cliches and conventions from 
other media?" 

This talk begins with that question, looks at a 
variety of traditional narrative approaches and 
assesses the ways in which games have 
applied and modified those approaches to 
greater and lesser effect. 



Takeaway: Attendees leave with a better 
understanding of traditional narrative 
structures and their application to games. 
More important, they'll leave with a look at 
one developer's thoughts on the dangers of 
traditional narrative and some (highly idiosyn- 
cratic) ideas about how we can develop game- 
specific narrative approaches. 

Intended Audience: Game developers and 
critics, anyone, really, who's interested in story- 
based games, can find this talk interesting and 
informative. No prior knowledge is necessary. 

Panel - All 

Great Games in 50k: Three Addictive Mobile 

Phone Titles 

Matthew Bellows, Mark Stephen Pierce, 

Matt Spall See pages 117-141 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 45pm 

Salon IV, Marriott 

Three accomplished mobile game designers 
present their creations, and talk about the 
nitty gritty details behind building them. The 
moderator, Matthew Bellows of Wireless 
Canning Review, will demo each game and 
comment on what makes it stand out from 
the crowd. The tenor of the panel is 
information rich and technically oriented. 

Takeaway: The audience gains insight from 
four mobile game experts about the current 
state of the art, the capabilities of the 
medium, and the challenges of creating a 
game for mobile phones. 

Intended Audience: In this session, designers 
and publishers getting involved in the mobile 
games segment get a perspective on what 
works on mobile. The only prerequisite is a 
curiousity about really small games. 

Lecture - All 

The Heart of the Hero 

Gerard Jones See page 127 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

A7, Convention Center 

Every genre and icon can be better understood 
by examining its origin. The superhero, now 
such a mainstay of movies and games, was 
once a new and startling creation, and by 
unraveling the cultural and psychological 
forces that compelled its creation we can 
deepen our understanding of why these 
superhuman action characters have only 
grown more popular in their seventy years of 
existence and how to create new superheroes 
that can speak more vitally to today's 
audiences. 



Gerard Jones, whose past books include Killing 
Monsters: Why Children Need Fantasy, 
Superheroes, and Make-Believe Violence, and 
whose superhero credentials include the 
creation of TV's Ultraforce and hundreds of 
comic books for Marvel and DC, is now 
finishing a major reexamination of the origins 
of the superhero and the comic book, coming 
from Basic Books later this year: Men of 
Tomorrow: The Unlikely Story of the Gangsters, 
Ceeks, and Mama's Boys who Invented the 
Comic Book. 

In his first public talk springing from Men of 
Tomorrow, Gerard shows how the superhero 
was born among the first generation "geeks" 
of early science fiction and has been an 
essential part of the formation and perpet- 
uation of "geek culture" as it has grown and 
become ascendant in entertainment and 
electronics. The concept sprang from the 
collision of contradictions: a culture of anti- 
violence in a period of extreme change and 
conflict, the personal struggles of timid 
adolescent boys in a macho society, an 
explosion of commercial sexual imagery in a 
prudish America, and the contradictory desires 
of marginalized people to fit into the greater 
world and also be true to themselves. These 
conflicts are in once again in collision, in 
different forms, and the relevance of bigger- 
than-life heroes is as great as ever. We can 
create more potent and popular heroes if we 
understand where superheroes come from 
and how they "work," psychologically and 
culturally. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The Interesting Thing About Bishops: 

Simulation Boundaries in Splinter Cell 

Clint Hocking See page 126 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

Salon III, Marriott 

Monolith's Craig Hubbard once observed;"ln 
real life, bishops can go anywhere they want. 
In chess, they can only move diagonally." 

This statement illustrates a fundamental 
concept in game design: we must make 
decisions about what aspects of our fictional 
world will be open to player interaction and 
what aspects of that world will be closed off. 
Like bishops in chess who have illusory 
freedom to move over the entire board, we 
want the player feel he has access to the 
entire world, while at the same time carefully 
limiting him to only a portion of it. Our ability 
to create rules and systems that disguise the 
difference between the 'black squares and the 
white' will directly impact the player's 



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enjoyment of the game and his feelings of agency in the game world. 

Using Splinter Cell to illustrate both successful and unsuccessful 
approaches, this lecture looks at ways to create a complex world that 
runs deeper than the surface of the game's interaction model without 
leaving the player feeling like he's watching the game instead of playing 
it. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave with a better understanding of where, why, 
and how to draw the line between systems that should be included in a 
game and those that should be left in the backdrop. 

Intended Audience: There are no prerequisites for the presentation, 
though the presentation is of particular interest to game designers, 
writers and level designers looking to create the feeling of a richer, more 
complex world. 

Panel - Intermediate 

Island Thunder and Raven Shield: Creating Believable Stories for 

Realistic Games 

Richard Dansky See page uifor bio 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-ii:3oam 

A2, Convention Center 

Aliens. Giant robots. Magical items. Lava. 

These are a few of the staples of computer game stories, and in 
generation after generation of games, they've made their appearance. 
But what happens when the fantastic is removed from the writer's 
toolkit, when all he's left with is the real world? Things get a little 
trickier when you can't make the rules of the world, because all of your 
players know how the real world acts, or at least, how they think it's 
supposed to. After all, a realistic game with a believable story can as 
immersive and powerful as one in a fantastic setting, while a poor 
realistic story, or one that's not believable, can damage the entire 
gameplay experience. 

However, story-building for a real-world based game brings with it its 
own unique challenges. Some of these, such as finding an appropriate 
villain, are obvious, whileothers are not. There are always risks, from 
contravening popularly held opinions of real-world events to having the 
headlines catch up with your game while it's still in production. And 
what happens when no one believes your meticulously researched 
backstory could ever have happened? All of these are difficulties the 
writer faces in concocting a believable game story, but all of them have 
solutions. 

This presentation, then, is a guide to creating realistic, believable stories 
for real-world based computer games, using Ghost Recon: Island 
Thunder and Rainbow Six: Raven Shield as examples. It covers story 
conception, creation and process, and includes discussion of research 
techniques, character creation, and the interaction between story and 
gameplay design. 

Takeaway: Participants leave the talk with a solid understanding of the 
necessities, challenges and benefits of creating believable game stories. 
They have a better knowledge of story techniques, research approaches 
and common pitfalls to avoid, as well as a base conception of the 
difference between "realistic" and "believable." The techniques covered 
in this talk apply to any real-world based game. 

Intended Audience: Game writers interested in working on real-world 
based games. Anyone looking to learn basic research and writing 






technique for games. Designers looking to integrate realism into their 
level and game designs. 

Roundtable - All 

Less is More? Design for Mobile Games 

Jim Blackhurst See page u8for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • i2-ipm 

Pacific, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

Plaza, Hilton 

Just what are the rules of mobile games design? How does that 
mythical beast known as 'gameplay' relate to games on mobile phones? 

What has been learnt in the traditional games industry that can be 
applied to mobile. Are there any valuable lessons learnt in the GBA and 
handheld space that can help us make better mobile games? Are their 
any other areas of content development such as web design, that can 
give us a heads up on best practices for Mobile games design and 
development? 

This roundtable promotes discussion and debate on which elements are 
essential ingredients to a mobile game, and which are just candy-floss. 
With mobile games we have the chance to learn from the mistakes and 
successes of games and platforms that have gone before us. Let's 
explore... 

Takeaway: The audience through their own participation take away the 
common consensus of what is best practice in mobile games design. 
This is a blend of ideas learnt from the Old School games design and the 
new discipline of design for mobile networked devices. 

Intended Audience: An interest in playing or developing mobile games is 
the only prerequisite for this roundtable. Members of the development 
community beginning or already involved with the development of 
mobile games would have the most to gain from attending, but the 
most valuable contributions could potentially come from areas of the 
traditional games development community that have been here before. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 

The Medium Maketh The Game: How Must Developers Adapt their 

Techniques for Constrained Platforms? 

Glenn Broadway See page ngfor bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 

L, Convention Center 

Friday, March 26 • 10:30-11:303171 

L, Convention Center 

To what extent does the platform affect the content of a game? Why 
don't we see point-and-clicks or flight sims on consoles; or fighting 
games on PCs? As new platforms such as mobile phones and iTV arrive 
do developers need to fully appreciate the factors that magnetise 
certain genres to platforms? 

Anyone working in these new arenas should be acutely aware of the 
technical constraints placed upon them (who could fail to notice a 64Kb 
limit?) and these certainly influence the types of games that get 
developed, but there are other factors to consider. The social habits of 
people playing mobile games can have a dramatic effect on the success 
of a particular product, and in this new age of online gaming there's 
never been a more 'connected' platform than the cell phone. 



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The main topic of discussion in these 
roundtable sessions are how developers 
should adapt their techniques and prior 
knowledge when working on new, constrained 
platforms. But if it turns into an argument 
about which is best, PC or console, then that'll 
be fun too! 

Takeaway: This roundtable appeals to anyone 
involved with game design, irrespective of 
genre or platform. The sessions may be of 
particular relevance to developers working 
within the mobile game industry (or for other 
constrained platforms such iTV). 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Open Spaces and How to Find Them in New 

Game Ideas 

Peter Molyneux See page 131 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 

A6, Convention Center 

As the games industry matures one could be 
forgiven for thinking that the possibilities for 
original game ideas are few and far between, 
but there are still plenty of opportunities to 
find and exploit in open spaces. More 
frequently, the old game genres seem to be 
blended and combined to create unique 
games which can't be pigeonholed. Similarly it 
is possible to take an established genre and 
put a brand new twist on it. Ironically while 
the technology gets more complex in some 
ways, game concepts are becoming more 
simplified. The presenter illustrates the open 
spaces exploited in games such as Fable, BC, 
Black & White 2 and The Movies. Yet finding 
an open space or hole in the market place is 
also only half the battle, it is the implemen- 
tation that makes a good game. The presenter 
shows how you can implement an original 
concept so that it fulfils all of its potential. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

A Peek Behind the Shoji: Japan's Videogame 

Market Today 

Ryoichi Hasegawa See page us for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 

J3, Convention Center 

You've heard all about the complexities of 
marketing games in Japan, the barriers to 
entry, and the alleged tastes of Japanese 
consumers. Well, nothing is impossible, and 
today, the landscape of Japan's videogame 
market is very different from what it was a 
few years ago, when those generalizations 
were formed. This discussion builds on the 
speaker's session last year about how to make 
your game successful in Japan, and focuses on 
answering many of the questions the previous 



session raised about the precise nature of the 
Japanese videogame market. 

The topics of discussion include: 

- Overview and update of the market 

- Retreating and developing trends 
-The changing shape of gaming 

- Following the Yen to mobile content 

- Abandoning the negative image of non- 
Japanese games 

- High sales of US and European developed 
titles such as Medal of Honor and GTA3 

- Introduction of the "CERO" rating system 

- Looking forward to more mature videogames 

»i» This lecture is simultaneously translated. 
Please arrive early to pick up your headset. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The Philosophical Roots of Computer Game 

Design 

Ernest W. Adams See page 117 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 4-5pm 

J2, Convention Center 

This lecture is a theoretical discussion of the 
historical, social and technological forces that 
produced the contemporary culture of 
computer game design and development. 
Although game design might seem to be 
primarily about making successful commercial 
products, in fact the subjects we choose to 
explore in our games are not necessarily 
dictated by the market, but are the product of 
our own peculiar philosophical origins. 

As digitaltechnologists we work with the 
classical tools of logic and order; as creative 
people we strive for the expression of 
romantic ideals. This tension between the 
classic and the romantic sides of our medium 
is the source of some of our more intractable 
creative problems. This lecture is not intended 
to offer specific solutions, but to enlighten 
and entertain. 

Lecture - All 

"Port" is a Four-Letter Word: The 

Challenges of Redesigning The Sims for the 

Console Market 

Michael Perry See page 133 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • g-ioam 

A7, Convention Center 

Will Wright's The Sims has become the best- 
selling PC game of all time,and has spawned 
several successful expansion packs and a 
burgeoning online community. In 2001, Maxis 
decided to bring The Sims to the console, and 
challenged Maxis veteran Michael Perry with 



the design task. In January 2003, Maxis/EA 
released an entirely redesigned version of The 
Sims for the PlayStation 2, with successful 
sales, excellent reviews, and the discovery of a 
whole new market for The Sims. How did 
Maxis, a PC-only game development studio, 
evolve console development expertise? What 
were some lessons learned in the redesign 
process that can apply to other PC games? 
Join Michael as he shares his experience of 
redesigning a game that is widely known and 
understood, and describes the process by 
which he learned that "port" is a four-letter 
word. 

Takeaway: Understanding the value of 
redesigning PC games for the console 

- Techniques for identifying design directions 
appropriate for console gamers 

- Methods PC development studios can use to 
successfully evolve console development 
expertise 

- Insight in to the inner workings of a 
successful game development studio 

- Inspiration to take current PC game designs 
to a level desired by console gamers 

Intended Audience: This talk is intended for 
game designers who are interested in 
bringing an existing PC game to the console. 
Game development team members and 
leaders who would like to understand a 
successful example of PC studio growth via 
game redesign will find this talk enlightening. 

Roundtable - Beginner 

The Power of Collectibles: Leveraging Your 

Player's Inner Obsessive-Compulsive 

Damion Schubert See page 136 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 

Plaza, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

Santa Clara I, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-ii:3oam 

Pacific, Hilton 

Whether it be stamps, coins, magic cards or 
beer cans, the concept of collecting as a hobby 
has proven again and again to be a powerful 
psychological motivitor, with a very broad 
appeal. In games, it can be even more 
powerful, as the designer can directly 
manipulate the variables that make it so 
compelling to the users. 

Many games include concepts of collectibility: 
varying dramatically in form and importance 
to the core game. Platform games, for 
example, often use some collection puzzle in 



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order to add replayability, whereas games like Magic the Gathering 
have collectability very much at the core. 

However, collectability is an even more intriguing concept in massively 
multiplayer titles, games which are fertile to the concept due to their 
persistence and their social nature. They also offer a much needed 
activity that is off the standard weary level treadmill, and offer a much 
desired commodity to fuel a virtual economy. 

Takeaway: The audience learns how to tap into the psychology of 
finding rare objects and completing matched sets to act as a force 
multiplier for their design. They learn the variables that can be toyed 
with to make these game systems even stronger, and they see proof of 
these concepts being used in existing games. Furthermore, they learn 
how to take advantage of the concepts of collectibility without adding 
undue code risk. They learn how to leverage these factors to greatly add 
replay value to a title. Lastly, viewers learn tricks to taking advantage of 
this concept in whatever genre they are working in, be it single-player 
console games or massively multiplayer worlds. 

Intended Audience: This talk is aimed at designers who hope to add 
great depth to their games without adding a lot of code or uncertainty. 

Sponsored by Sony 

PS9 

Dominic Mallinson & Richard Marks See page 130 for bios 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:15-5:^171 

C4, Convention Center 

Science or fiction? Join us as we repeatedly ask the question, "What if...?" 
and then seriously consider plausible ramifications. What if game 
machines had massive network bandwidth between one another? What 
if network latency was microseconds and not milliseconds (faster than 
light!)? What if compute power was not a limit (petaflop performance)? 
What if Al systems start comfortably passing the Turing test? What 
happens when we can no longer tell that a character is rendered? What 
if we all had true 3d displays? What if we have ubiquitous networked 
displays (on cornflake packets, clothes, walls...)? What if we have 
ubiquitous networked 3d cameras? What if games could do real-time 
motion capture in the home? What if a game machine could understand 
natural speech? What if a game machine knew if you were happy, sad, or 
bored? What if telepresence becomes commonplace (drive a real race car 
from your living room, visit real locations with real-time 3d sensing)? 
What if the cyberspace of science fiction was a reality? 

We will also provide technical opinions on the likelihood of when/if each 
question may be relevant, and for some questions we will show research 
results that represent initial steps. 

Takeaway: An awareness that technological breakthroughs and 
hardware advancements will continue to re-invent this industry, thereby 
keeping it healthy and fresh for years to come. Or at least a few good 
ideas for some science fiction novels. 

Intended Audience: All game developers interested in speculation as to 
how computer entertainment might evolve in the years to come. 

Panel - Beginner 

SciFi MMPs: Lessons from Star Wars Galaxies and Earth and Beyond 

Chris Klug, Raph Koster, Jesse Schell See pages 117-141 for bios 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

J3, Convention Center 




Since the days of Jules Verne, stories about futuristic space adventure 
have captured the human imagination. Film, TV, and then video games 
gave us new ways to engage in these fantastic worlds. Now massive 
networked gameplay adds new, deeper methods of interacting with the 
fantasy worlds of sci-fi adventure. Come learn about the hows and whys 
of this new medium as Raph Koster, lead designer of Star Wars 
Galaxies, and Chris Klug, lead designer of Earth and Beyond, discuss 
their philosophies about how to best create the ultimate sci-fi world. 

Raph and Chris consider many questions, including: 

- What is the role of story in a Sci-fi MMOG? 

- What are the pros and cons of worlds based on licenses? 

- What do people really expect from sci-fi space adventure? 

- Which is more important - flying spaceships, or walking around? 

- Who is more important to an MMOGs success. The hardcore, or the 
casual gamer? 

- What is the "right way" to interact with the player community? 

- Aren't these worlds just dressed up versions of Ultima and Everouest? 

- Is the market really big enough for more than one sci-fi MMOG? 

- What are the best and worst points of Star Wars Galaxies and Earth 
& Beyond? 

Be prepared for some truly thought-provoking discussion, as these two 
titans of design team up to talk about the past, present, and future of 
sci-fi MMOGs in what is sure to be a most memorable panel session. 

Takeaway: Space adventure MMORPGs are new, and the "right" 
approach to take for success is not clear. A debate between two 
competing designers, especially such well-spoken ones as Chris and 
Raph (who have both agreed to participate), and bring to light the many 
design issues that anyone who would create a space adventure 
MMORPG must face. 

Intended Audience: Anyone who is interested in the future MMORPG 
design. A basic familiarity with the elements of MMORPGs. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The Secret of Pac-Man's Success: Making Fun First 

Toru Iwatani See page 127 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

J3, Convention Center 

The games that enjoy breakout success are typically built on a wide 
range of key factors. Developers of a hit game may focus on as many as 
ten fundamental features, but once they release the title, gamers 
naturally find a deeper appeal through the process of playing through 
the game. While progressing through the title, the gamer experiences 
an increasing level of enjoyment, the most critical fundamental factor of 
game design. 

Based on his experiences creating groundbreaking hits like Pac-Man and 
Time Crisis, the speaker proposes that the most effective mantra for a 
game developer is "Fun First," remembering that games are made for, 
and open to, the public. Gamers simply won't keep playing a game that 
amounts to a list of chores, no matter how technologically impressive 
the title may be. Yet determining that "fun factor" is still an elusive 
concept, even after a quarter century of gaming output. The reasons 
how and why human beings experience fun is a field that deserves 
serious consideration, in light of the enormous revenue potential of the 
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In exploring how to make "Fun First," the 
speaker analyzes the following elements: 

- Play theory from game history and in 
practice 

- Taking a creative game idea and building the 
rules for it 

- Techniques of making and presenting a 
game plan 

- Understanding the gap between users and 
clients, and the solution to it 

- Managing multiple areas of game 
production 

-The roles and responsibilities of the producer 
and the creator 

-The critical steps in planning the production 
of a game 

- Observation > Analysis > Consideration > 
Hypothesis > Action > Evaluation 

- Methods of management demanded of the 
producer and the creator 

- The balance between interpreting gaming 
trends and driving the future of games 

<8* This lecture is simultaneously translated. 
Please arrive early to pick up your headset. 

Panel - Intermediate 

State of the Art: Anatomy of 3D Level 

Design 

Neil Alphonso, Ed Byrne, Heather Kelley, Matt 

Wood See pages 117-141 for bios 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-ii:3oam 

Ji, Convention Center 

What is a level designer? Over the course of 
the past decade, the role has come to define 
someone who rides the line between the 
established roles of programmer, designer and 
artist. Most 3D level designers [those of us 
creating 3D interactive and dynamic game 
space] exist in a multi-disciplinary position 
that touches on all aspects of the pipeline. 
Aside from the obvious architectural and 
design skills required, level designers also 
need to be excellent communicators, 
mediators and problem solvers, as most often 
they are the last stage in the production 
process, the point of entry where all things 
coalesce into actual gameplay. 

As level designers find firmer ground on 
development teams, common questions arise. 
What are the tools we should be using? As 
level complexity increases, how does the 
pipeline need to evolve? What are the basic 
skills a level designer should have? Four 
panelists representing four separate studios 
and viewpoints will tackle these questions, 



discuss their experiences and offer some 
answers and techniques for both established 
and aspiring level designers. 

Takeaway: This discussion aims to have the 
audience gain a better understanding into the 
often nebulous tenets of 3D level design, past, 
present and future, and insight into new 
design and implementation methodologies. 

Attendees also learn about the production 
pipelines and pressures that each of the panel 
members has experienced as a 3D level 
designer, the guiding principles that manage 
these pressures, the issues they can bring 
about, and potential solutions to difficulties. 

Intended Audience: This is an intermediate 
level panel discussion intended for anyone 
interested, or employed, in the field of level 
design. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Storytelling in Earth & Beyond 
Chris Klug See page 128 for bio 
Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 
B2, Convention Center 

People know many forms of storytelling, they 
know a lot about stories, and they are 
inundated with stories 24 hours a day. Then 
the writing team on Earth & Beyond had to 
figure out how to tell a story in the new 
environment of massive multiplayer games. 
This technology opens up a new stage upon 
which to tell stories, and players are the new 
actors in this new kind of drama. Debate has 
raged over how much of a story to tell, with 
one side saying, "All we need to do is to give 
the players the tools and they will tell great 
stories," and others saying, "Well, no, we need 
to give them something to hang their hat on; 
they need a story." The result is a situation 
equivalent to where the movie industry was in 
1905 or the TV industry was in 1950 or theater 
in ancient Greece. This seminar explains what 
EA learned, what they did right, and what they 
got wrong. 

A second theme in the seminar is how do you 
plan and schedule this kind of beast? The 
universe in Earth & Beyond is fairly large and 
the writing task is huge (65+ space sectors, 30+ 
starbases, 300+ NPCs, all with dialogue, 18 fully 
voiced N PCs with over 700 pages of spoken 
dialogue, a staff of seven writers). How does a 
fictional universe like that get created? How is 
it managed? What kind of editorial process is in 
place? How do you plan for the future? 

Takeaway: Attendees leave with an 
understanding of what it took to deliver a 



story in Earth & Beyond, how the audience 
responded to that story, and how it fit into the 
overall marketing plan for the product. In 
addition, a model for managing this scale of 
writing effort is presented. 

Intended Audience: This session would be 
useful especially to game designers, 
producers, and persons responsible for 
marketing games, especially massive 
multiplayer online games. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 
Storytelling in Games 
Bob Bates See page 118 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • i2-ipm 
D, Convention Center 
Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 
Pacific, Hilton 
Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 
Pacific, Hilton 

This roundtable assess the status of 
storytelling in games. The discussion focuses 
on where we are, where we think we can go, 
how to get there, and some of the problems 
we face along the way. 

Questions for discussion include: 

- How important is a good story to today's 
games? 

- What story moments have succeeded (or 
failed) in games published in the last year? 

- Which elements of traditional stories can we 
include in our games, and which must we 
abandon? 

-What is the value of "user-generated" stories, 
especially in multiplayer games? 

- How can we train game designers to be 
better storytellers? 

Takeaway: It has been said that "stories are 
our culture talking to itself, trying to decide 
what it should be." If that's true, storytelling 
games have as much opportunity to affect the 
world around us as do books and movies. As 
we learn to tell better stories in our games, 
our voices will inevitably start to be heard as 
part of the cultural conversation. 

Intended Audience: The session is intended for 
anyone interested in incorporating stories into 
games. No prior knowledge is needed. 

Sponsored by Tapwave 
Tapwave - A New Mobile Entertainment 
Platform to Showcase Your Talents 
Mitzi McGilvray See page 130 for bio 



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Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 
C4, Convention Center 

Tapwave™ has introduced a new category of Palm 05® based products - 
mobile entertainment gear. This session will cover the unique hardware, 
software and Palm OS (5.2T) enhancements that enable a breakthrough 
mobile entertainment and gaming experience. Specific areas of focus 
will include APIs for graphics, vibration, sound, Ul, and application 
management. Additional information will be provided on Tapwave's 
custom development environment, the X-Forge'" 3D game engine, and 
the business opportunity for Zodiac™ optimized applications. 

Takeaway: Start Developing on the Tapwave Platform Today! 

Intended Audience: Came Developers 

Lecture - Beginner 

10 Tricks from Psychology for Making Better Characters 

Katherine Isbister See page 126 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:306:30pm 

A6, Convention Center 

This session explores ways to make characters more real, interesting, 
and fun for players. The goal is to expand the audience with characters 
that appeal to a broader set of gamers. With the increasing powers of 
today's graphics and Al, it's easy to create an elaborate and expensive, 
but somehow "flat" character. A cheaper and often more effective 
shortcut is to use a little psychology. The more developers know about 
how people "read" other people in real life interactions, the better their 
chances of making an engaging and fun game character. 

In this session, attendees learn a few key ideas from social psychology 
that can help make characters that feel alive and really enhance a 
player's gaming experience. Topics include using social roles to set and 
deliver on player expectations, managing first impressions for maximum 
appeal and character clarity, the power of body language, using research 
about how gender affects gaming to build characters that appeal to 
women, and crafting player-characters that work at all four psycho- 
logical levels for players: fantasy, visceral, cognitive, and social. The 
discussion also addresses how developers can make sure achieving the 
effects they'd like, incorporating a bit of characterpsychology testing 
into their play-testing cycle. 

The session includes examples from well-known games (including Jak 
and Daxter.The Sims, Half-Life, Halo, Zelda: Win dwaker, and others) 
and look at why their characters work from a psychological point of 
view. You'll get 10 easy tricks you can apply to your own character design 
process. These are relevant for artists and animators, as well as 
programmers. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave the lecture with an understanding of a few 
key social psychological concepts that they can use to guide their 
character design choices. They leave with a practical understanding 
based upon seeing examples of these principles in action in well-known 
games, and have 10 tricks they can use right away in their own game 
design and production. They also have a list of sources for following up 
on principles of special interest. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Triangulation: A Schizophrenic Approach to Came Design 

Will Wright See page 140 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-ii:3oam 

A3, Convention Center 



You're the designated designer on a big-budget, high-pressure title. You 
have a budget, you have a team, now it's up to you - but you're stuck. 
Some seemingly minor issue has uncovered a fundamental flaw in your 
design. You rack your brain but can't seem to find a solution. What do 
you do? 

This talk covers practical approaches to applying various design 
methods. In particular what can you, as a designer, do when you don't 
seem to be getting traction with your current approach. Learning to 
jump out of your current mindset and attack from an entirely different 
point of view seems to be a key skill for dealing with "designer block." 

A few alternate mindsets include: 

- What am I shopping for? 

- What are the Nouns/Verbs/Adjectives? 

- Draw the Movie Poster 

- How would a player describe what happened? 

- Design the Toy 

-The player is always a genius 

- The player is dumb as dirt 

- What would my sister say? 

- How would Russian space engineers solve it? 

This talk is designed to provide practical responses to these issues. 

Roundtable - All 

User Interface Design 

Garner Halloran See page 125 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 

Pacific, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

D, Convention Center 

Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 

Pacific, Hilton 

The user interface is arguably the most important part of the game. A 
bad interface can cause the user to throw the game aside in frustration. 
This roundtable focuses on ways to make interface better and more 
user-friendly. Areas of user interface design that is discussed: Control 
Schemes, Expert vs. Novice Users, Text vs. Icons, Prototyping, Good and 
Bad Examples of Ul Design. 

Takeaway: Attendees have a better understanding of what constitutes 
good user interface design and techniques for improving interfaces in 
their own games. 

Intended Audience: Intended for designers, software engineers, and 
artists who work on user interface design. All levels of experience are 
encouraged to attend. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Wants and Instincts 

Tetsuya Mizuguchi See page 131 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

J3, Convention Center 

Where are games going in the near future in the US, in Europe and in 
Asia? Are there any differences in the desires of children and adults? 






-71- 



GAME DESIGN TRACK 



How do we incorporate human wants, desires 
and instincts into our game designs? Drawing 
on a Japanese TV show in which the speaker 
acted as the teacher of his alma mater, this 
session endeavors to "feel" the future 
possibilities in game and media design. 

'•'• This lecture is simultaneously translated. 
Please arrive early to pick up your headset. 

Roundtable - All 
Web-Based Games Roundtable 
Brian Robbins See page 735 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 
Santa Clara II, Hilton 
Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 
Pacific, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 10:3011:30am 
D, Convention Center 

Web-based games are any games played within 
a web-browser. Typically these games are much 
smaller both in terms of production time, 
budget, file-size, and length of gameplay than 
"traditional" games. However these games are 
also truly mass market, being played by millions 
of people every day. This 3rd annual series of 
roundtables discusses many of the issues 
involved in creating and maintaining web- 
based games, and the sites where they are 
played. Each day focuses on a single issue. Day 
one technology, Day two business models, and 
Day three community issues. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave the roundtables 
with a better feeling for what is happening in 
the web-based games industry. They gain 
insight into other people's ideas, as well as 
receive feedback on their own methods. 

Intended Audience: These roundtables are 
designed for developers and publishers of 
web-based games. Day one focuses on many 
of the technical issues involved in developing 
the games, and is targeted more to game 
programmers and designers. Days two and 
three focuses on business and community 
issues respectively; they are targeted towards 
decision and policy makers for web-based 
game developers and publishers. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

What Got Left out of Battlefield 1942 

Johan Persson See page 133 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 

Ji, Convention Center 

As feature, and content rich as Battlefield 
1942 may be, it was still subject to painful 
feature cutting during the second half of the 
project. What planned features did not make 
it into the game and why? 



Looking back now with most of the answers, 
what features did we get to regret having cut 
out, and what features had a negligible effect? 
Are there features or content in the game that 
we would have cut out, had we known what 
we know today? How well do the features we 
want to address today correlate to the 
features we felt were so painful to remove 
during the project? 

In short: in a perfect world, what would we 
have done differently? (Disregarding the fact 
that there would never have been a World War 
II in a perfect world.) 

Takeaway: Attendees leave inspired to take a 
new look at your current project and look 
again at what is it that really matters to your 
product and whereyou need to put your focus. 
Perhaps some of the cool features you so 
dearly cling to are not going to be what makes 
or brakes the game after all. 

Lecture - All 

Why We Play Games: The Four Keys to Player 

Experience 

Nicole Lazzaro See page ngfor bio 

Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 

J3, Convention Center 

Level completion, high scores, and cut scenes 
do not make a game great. Players want more 
than something to think, see, or do. What 
players value above all else are their emotions: 
their hopes, their fears, and their dreams. 
Entertainment that taps into who we are 
offers a more compelling and enchanting 
player experience. 

Why do we play games? 

- Emotion 

- Challenge 

- Enchantment 

- Social Interaction 

This class unearths recent treasures of 
creating exceptional entertainment through 
doing. It covers the four keys to creating player 
experiences from XEODesign's independent 
research of 30 core, casual, and non-gamers; 
and our experience in designing casual 
entertainment such as Cosmopolitan Virtual 
Makeover 2, the Mad Magazine Archive, and 
Shockwave games such as for 
ChevronCars.com. Additional insight comes 
from the fields of philosophy, psychology of fun, 
human computer interaction, and the arts and 
humanities. This class provides tools developers 
can use to understand why we play games and 
how to pump up the emotions in them. 



Takeaway: This talk focuses on XEODesign's 
four keys to player experience. It features 
research from the psychology of fun and 
effective computing to demonstrate how to 
get specific emotions out of game play without 
the use of pre-scripted story sequences. 
Attendees understand how to design deeper 
player experiences by understanding the 
several roles emotion plays in humans and how 
to increase their intensity. This talk also offers a 
reading list and printed guidelines for running 
payability studies and on observing player 
emotions while playing a game. 

Intended Audience: Game designers of all 
genres and all levels interested in increasing 
the emotional impact of their games beyond 
the use of cut scenes and scripted sequences. 
The class is particularly useful for advanced 
designers looking for new inspiration on 
building emotions in players. 

Lecture - Advanced 

Would the Real Emergent Gameplay Please 

Stand Up? 

Harvey Smith & Randy Smith 

See page 737 for bios 
Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 
B2, Convention Center 

"Emergent gameplay" is a popular industry 
buzz word these days, with more games 
claiming they have it and more publishers 
with their eyes on successful products like 
GTA3 wanting some of it for their games. But 
does anyone know what it really is, or are we 
all confusing it with something else? What 
good is it and what is the cost? Above all: how 
do you add emergent gameplay to games? 

This presentation takes a stab at defining 
emergent gameplay and describing how to 
create it. A variety of angles are covered, from 
traditional academic definitions of emergence 
to compelling examples from modern games. 
Topics include the costs, benefits, and risks of 
emergence, and the role of game systems, 
game mechanics, autonomous agents, and 
behavior models in creating emergence. The 
presentation focuses on practical recipes for 
designing and implementing emergent 
gameplay and concludes by discussing how to 
add it to real game examples fielded from the 
audience. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn about emergent 
gameplay, including how to recognize it, how 
to evaluate its appropriateness for their 
games, and most importantly how to create it. 
Attendees are exposed to specific examples 
and implementation strategies. 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



-72- 






www.gdconf.com 



GAME DESIGN TRACK 



Intended Audience: This presentation is intended for game system 
designers and level-builders who wish to create emergent gameplay on 
current or future projects. Attendees benefit from some background in 
game systems, game mechanics, Al unit design, and traditional theories 
of emergence. 

Sponsored by Xbox 
Xbox Developer Training Day 

Thursday, March 25 • 9-ii:3oam & 2-6:i5pm 
J1, Convention Center 

Join the Xbox Advanced Technology Group and special guest speakers 
from Pseudointeractive, High-Voltage, and Soundelux to learn about 
Microsoft's vision for the future of games. 

This day long tutorial goes into detail about how to create the best 
games on the most current and powerful software in the industry. All 
GDC attendees with a conference pass are welcome. Please go to room 
Ji in the convention center. Courses take place from 9-ii:3oam and 
2-6:i5pm. 



Lecture - Beginner 

Zoological Gardens: The Science of Creature Design 

Ian Klimon See page 128 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 4-5pm 

A2, Convention Center 



Building believable creatures for gaming environments is not as easy as 
may appear at first glance. Bringing creatures to life entails a lot more 
than taking an existing model, slapping a color in front of its name, and 
kicking it out the door. Why does this creature exist, and what purpose 
does it serve in the design of the world? What does the designer need 
out of this creature? What does the designer want out of this creature? 
What does the player need out of this creature? What does the player 
want out of this creature? What does this creature do when the player is 
not present? Most importantly, why is this creature there? A designer 
needs to be able to answer these questions before creating a new 
creature. Knowing these questions and thinking through the process of 
answering them allow designers to create creatures that leap off the 
screen and into players' homes. 

Takeaway: Attendees takeaway a solid understanding of the concepts 
underlying the creation of creatures for game worlds. 

Intended Audience: This lecture is intended for developers interested in 
the creation of unique creatures for their game worlds. The subject 
matter level ranges from beginner to intermediate. 



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There has never been a better time for women to 
redefine what's possible in the gaming industry. 

You're invited along with other exceptionally talented 
women to celebrate, network and live on the edge. 



Not only will you meet women that are not afraid 
to surpass what's been done; making the industry's 
best games. Your attendance will go beyond in making 
a difference, because for every women who attends, 
Microsoft will donate $25.00 to Breast Cancer Research 
through the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. 




WEDNEBDHV, mHPCH S4, BEID4 

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For questions and information, please email: 

wmngamer(a)microsoft.com 




©2004 Microsoft Corporation. All Rights Reserved. 

Xbox and the Xbox logos are registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corp. 



mEET 5nmE df the ujnmEN thrt kirke xbdx pdcki 



SHELLEY - ART LEAD 



LAURA - DIR. XBOX ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY GROUP 



How does the work that you do make 



What does the AH 



I am the Art Lead for Xbox. I lead a team 
of 6 artists. We are a shared resource 
which means we supply the art for multiple 
projects within the group everything from 
2D to 3D, web to print and interactive 
demos and prototypes for usability and 
concept development. 



I was a game artist before I came here 
and never thought of joining Microsoft until 
Xbox came along. I was in at the beginning 
of the console and really enjoyed being 
part of something so new and exciting. I 
am lucky to have the opportunity to build 
such a creative and skillful team - when I 
was hired I was the art team - watching it 
expand and grow to successfully handle 
the myriad of projects that land in our laps 
is incredibly rewarding. I have an excep- 
tionally varied work day - I am never bored 
and I am always in on the most exciting 
and innovative new projects - even before 
the majority of the company knows. 



The ATG group has helped hundreds of games 
to ship on time and at a higher quality bar. 
The ATG group has 218 years of games 
experience in all areas of game development. 
We do everything from helping an artist to 
get higher fidelity textures, a programmer to 
speed up the performance of their game, or 
helping a designer to map out a better set 
of controls. We help the entire community 
of developers and they in turn ship higher 
quality titles to gamers. 



I believe games are important to the 
world. Games changed my life and they 
change the lives of many people. Games 
are a unique medium as they are highly 
interactive and they bring people together 
to form life long relationships. I love 
having the chance to help make that 
community thrive, to help deliver better 
quality to the gamers in the world, 
I'm happy. 



ALICE - TECHNICAL PROGRAM MANAGER 



MAREN - CONSOLE & PERIPHERAL XBOX HARDWARE QC 



Describe your role? 



lat are your responsibilities? 



I make it easier for developers to build 
games on Xbox. For instance, I worked on 
creating a common download manager for 
Xbox games and creating a common library 
for the friends list UI. Now, adding a 
friend's list to a new Xbox game takes 
days instead of weeks. 



I am responsible for the quality of the xbox 
hardware products (console and peripheral 
devices). My impact is insuring that end 
customers have a positive experience when 
they purchase our products. 



I love playing games and I find software 
technology fascinating. For me, Xbox is the 
ideal place to work. We have the time, 
resources, and company commitment to 
make a great software platform for video 
game developers. 



My team is creative, driven, passionate and 
fun to work with. The Xbox products are 
leading edge. It's an exciting, diverse, and 
challenging company to be part of. I have 
been here 8 years and it feels like one! 



^ XGOX 



IGDA TRACK 




0igda 



international game 
developers association 




As a reflection of the IGDA's mission to foster the industry, the sessions in this track address the 
most relevant topics affecting the developer community today: violence and social issues; 
preserving our past; gender inequities; business practices, etc. The IGDA track offers a means by 
which developers can get involved - nearly all sessions are directly linked to committee work and 
outreach efforts. Attendees come away from the IGDA sessions empowered to make a difference 
in the game industry. 



Group Gathering - All 
Academics' Croup Gathering 
Matteo Bittanti See page 118 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 
IGDA Booth 

Do games stir your analytical mind? Are you 
interested to create models and theories that 
capture the essence and uniqueness of 
games? Are you teaching a new degree on 
game development? This Group Gathering is a 
place where you can meet other academic 
game researchers, teachers and professors 
who are visiting GDC. The emphasis is on 
informal discussion and getting to know other 
scholars interested in the world of games and 
game development. 

Takeaway: Contacts to other academic game 
researchers and teachers working with games; 
better idea of the current situation in the 
academic game research field. 

Intended Audience: Academic professionals, 
teachers, researchers and developers 
interested in the more fundamental or 
theoretical questions of games, their design 
and different forms of game playing. 

Roundtable - All 

Al Interface Standards: Open Beta 

Alexander Nareyek & Nick Porcino 

See pages 132 & 734 for bios 

Friday, March 26 • g-ioam & io:30-ii:3oam 

San Carlos II, Hilton 

You certainly know about OpenGL or DirectX. 
In short, our standards initiative is directed in 
the same direction - only for the domain of 
artificial intelligence. We are close to finalizing 
a first version and will present and discuss our 
drafts at the session. Thus, your final 
possibility to intervene! 

We are not going to have interesting 
discussions like if the third argument of the 



pathfinding API should better be a pointer and 
such things, but will discuss the general 
workings, functionality provided etc. Here is 
what you can expect: 

- Why are Al interface standards necessary 

-What's the benefit for you if you use the 
standards 

- API architecture overview: Modules for world 
interfacing, pathfinding, steering, finite state 
machines, rule-based systems and goal- 
oriented action planning 

- A brief guided tour through the single 
modules and their concepts and 
functionality 

- A look into the future 

-And discussions with your feedback of course 

- We will walk you through nice and easy 
application examples throughout the 
presentation. However, the focus is on 
communicating the big picture. You can 
always follow up the details in the draft and 
on the web. 

The roundtable is organized by the IGDA's Al 
Interface Standards Committee. More 
information about the committee can be 
found at: www.igda.org/ai/ai_committee.php 

Takeaway: Participants get informed about 
the goals, functionality and concepts of the Al 
interface standards proposed by the SIG. 

Intended Audience: The intended audience are 
all people involved in the game development 
process that are affected by Al-related 
standards - especially producers and game Al 
programmers. Al middleware producers and 
people involved in academic Al research are, of 
course, very welcome as well. 

Group Gathering - All 

Chapter Coordinators' Group Gathering 

Liz Wakefield See page 739 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 10:30-11:303171 

IGDA Booth 



Community-minded game developers 
volunteer to organize IGDA Chapters in cities 
around the world. This Group Gathering gives 
Chapter Organizers a chance to connect with 
each other and share successes and 
challenges. Through informal discussion we'll 
get to know each other and make contacts to 
facilitate inter-chapter communication 
throughout the year. 

Takeaway: Contacts to other IGDA chapter 
coordinators and ideas for effective chapter 
management. 

Intended Audience: All IGDA chapter coordi- 
nators, organizers, and advisors who are 
already involved with an IGDA chapter, or plan 
to be. 

Group Gathering - All 
Creature Artists Group Gathering 
Jason Wiener See page 140 for bio 
Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 
IGDA Booth 

Do you design monsters with nasty honking 
teeth, claws to turn prey to sashimi, and wings 
to blot out the sun? Would you like to learn 
how those parts could work together in real 
anatomy? Take a break from lectures to chat 
and draw! Explore the skeletons often Earth 
creatures to develop an understanding of the 
fundamental structures needed for various 
types of locomotion. What principles underlie 
the configuration of flying beasts? What 
structures does a creature design need to be 
aquatic, fast-moving, or tree-climbing? Once 
explained and discussed, these principles are 
applied in creative exercises to generate 
original designs. Come prepared to think, chat, 
and create! 

Takeaway: Participants gain an understanding 
of comparative skeletal structures and creative 
methods for applying this information to 
concept art. Come draw with us! 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of GDC 2004. 



-74- 



www.gdconf.com 



V 



IGDA TRACK 



Intended Audience: All drawing levels are welcome. This group 
gathering is intended for concept artists seeking a richer knowledge 
base in animal anatomy for creating creatures. 

Group Gathering - All 
Demo Sceners' Group Gathering 
Paul Bragiel See page ngfor bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 5:306:30pm 

IGDA Booth 

Demo Sceners and X-Sceners, come to meet and greet your peers. Share 
what you've been up to, some discussion about the Scene today, and 
relax with your friends. 

Takeaway: Networking with Demo Sceners in the game industry. 

Intended Audience: Demo Sceners, X-Sceners, and anyone interested in 
the Demo Scene. 

Roundtable - All 

Diversity in Game Development: Beyond Stereotypes 

Darrell Porcher See page 734 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 

San Carlos II, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • 9^ioam 

San Carlos II, Hilton 

At GDC 2001 an informal roundtable to discuss the role/existence of 
"minorities" in game development was held on the last day of the 
conference. The general consensus was that it was a very valuable 
experience and offered a tremendous exchange of information, ideas 
and contacts. As a result of that first meeting, at GDC 2002 a packed 
and lively roundtable discussion addressed topics on stereotypes, 
education, networking and barriers to the industry. The roundtable 
received great coverage and feedback. One suggestion was to open the 
forum to everyone at the conference, including non-badge holders and 
to make it more social. Many members of the discussions have formed 
friendships and business partnerships, since the first informal meeting. 
In 2003, we held a Group Gathering at the IGDA booth to focus the 
group a little on more specific topics At this roundtable we explore, in 
more detail, topics such as diversity in game design, promotion and 
marketing; challenges in gaining a more diverse game development 
community, etc. 

Takeaway: A new point of view and new friends. 

Intended Audience: Anyone with an open mind and heart. 

Roundtable - All 

The Education of a Game Developer 

Eric Zimmerman See page 140 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 

San Carlos I, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 

San Carlos II, Hilton 

The game industry continues to grow at a remarkable rate, and the 
academic study of games is also booming. But where will these new 
game developers and game scholars come from? What do they need to 
know? How will they be educated? And what impact will they have on 
the future of games? 



This roundtable is a forum for discussing the complex issues 
surrounding the training and education of those who would create and 
study games. The starting point for our discussion will be the IGDA's 
Curriculum Framework, a document that outlines an approach to game- 
related education, available at www.igda.org/academia. Is this 
document enough? Is it helpful in putting together a game 
development or game studies curriculum? What can the IGDA do to 
improve the document and assist educators in creating game-related 
courses, degree programs, and departments? 

Please come prepared to share your war stories from the educational 
front lines - or to give your opinion to educators who are desperate for 
input from professional game developers. In addition to discussing the 
Curriculum Framework, we will also be discussing larger issues related 
to game education and advocacy.The comments in these roundtables 
will be incorporated into the IGDA Curriculum Framework and into the 
ongoing activities of the Education Committee, so come and make a 
difference for the future of games and education. 

Takeaway: The purpose of the roundtable is to improve the IGDA 
Curriculum Framework, as well as to share approaches to solving the 
complex problems of educating game developers and game scholars. 
Attendees should be willing to share from their experience exploring 
teaching strategies, syllabus writing, and program curriculum design. 
From this discussion, a better understanding of the basic issues 
surrounding games and education as well as concrete approaches and 
solutions should emerge. 

Intended Audience: This session is intended for instructors who are 
teaching any aspect of game development, including game design, 
programming, visual and audio design, project management, or the 
legal and business aspects of games. Game studies scholars teaching 
classes from a humanities or social science approach should also attend. 
Current and recently graduated students who would like to comment on 
their recent experiences in game-related studies should also attend. 
Additionally, any game developer with an interest in the education of 
game developers, journalists, critics, and scholars should also attend. 

Lecture - All 

ESRB Explained: Behind the Ratings 

Marc Szafran See page 138 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 9-iiam 

B2, Convention Center 

After two years of development and millions of dollars invested in 
production, have you ever had a game rated M, for Mature, by the ESRB 
when your objective was to create a title for a Teen audience? Have you 
ever spent hours trying to figure out how and why one game gets rated 
E for Everyone, when another seemingly similar title receives a T for 
Teen? The ESRB will try to answer these questions and more as well as 
shed light on its ratings process. 

In this lecture, you see actual examples of content that have historically 
triggered a particular designation with raters. You'll see footage that 
helps to define the boundaries of each rating category, illustrating as 
precisely as possible where one rating category ends and another 
begins. Finally, you'll seethe details of how to prepare your product 
submission to the ESRB, and what happens once it has been received: 
Who rates your game? How do they rate it? How do different factors 
such as context and player control contribute to determining a final 
rating? What does "comic mischief" mean? What are the various 
violence descriptors and when are they applied? 




IGDA TRACK 



Understanding the ESRB's processes and 
requirements help you to achieve your rating 
objective and will ease you through the rating 
submission process. 

Takeaway: The general content boundaries for 
each rating category, submission requirements 
necessary for the rating of your product, what 
"pertinent content" is and how it will affect 
your product's rating, and an overview of the 
rating review process. 

Intended Audience: Designers, project 
managers, producers, publisher liaisons, 
product managers, project leads, and anyone 
responsible for content decisions. 

Roundtable - All 

Forward: A Working Session for Women in 

Game Development 

Sheri Craner Ray See page 124 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 

San Carlos I, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

San Carlos I, Hilton 

The Women in Game Development 
Committee has been in existence for three 
years and has made great progress in many 
areas. It's time to focus on the upcoming five 
years, develop a plan for the best way to focus 
our energies and a list of projects for us to 
focus on. We talk about the strides made so 
far and then focus discussion on the direction 
of the WiGD committee for the future, 
including projects for both the short and long 
term. Come prepared for construction conver- 
sation and be ready to sign up to help! 

Takeaway: Attendees are given an opportunity 
to participate in determining the direction of 
the Women in Game Development SIG as well 
as given a chance to be an active participant 
as well! 

Intended Audience: Anyone interested in the 
progress of women in game development. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 
Game Accessibility Implementation 
Thomas Westin See page 140 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 5:306:30pm 
San Carlos I, Hilton 
Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 
San Carlos I, Hilton 

Game accessibility is a new field for game 
developers in general. There are special games 
made for different groups of disabled, but 
accessibility is something for all, not just 
disabled (which are more users than you may 



think though). Although not the same 
problem, you can to some extent compare 
game accessibility with web accessibility, 
where an accessible design also makes the 
content accessible on units with low 
bandwidth, slow CPUs or small displays (e.g., 
mobiles/PDAs). The focus of the IGDA Game 
Accessibility Committee is to make regular 
games accessible. Game accessibility expands 
the target group of your game and hence it 
should be considered a financially important 
factor. It also enhances the user experience 
since it makes the game easier to use, and can 
provide the gamer with new game 
experiences. Finally, there is a social responsi- 
bility that should be taken seriously by the 
game industry as a whole to include all kinds 
of users in gaming and game development. 
Game accessibility can be hard or easy to 
achieve for certain combinations of games 
and groups of users. An accessible interface is 
not necessarily accessible for all, but 
accessible for more gamers. The question is to 
what extent you can make your game 
accessible and still make a living from your 
game. At the time of this writing the Game 
Accessibility Committee is working at 
compiling a white paper of accessible game 
designs. The roundtable session will discuss 
accessible game designs related to implemen- 
tation in regular game development. 

Takeaway: To what extent your company can 
implement game accessibility, considering 
enhanced target group and user experience 
versus financial issues. 

Intended Audience: Game interface 
developers, publishers, programmers, sound 
designers, graphic designers and others 
interested in game accessibility. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 

Game Credits: Towards Industry Guidelines 

Dave Weinstein See page 140 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 

San Carlos II, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 4-5pm 

San Carlos I, Hilton 

Far from there being an industry standard, 
game credits are often not standardized 
within a company. What is the difference 
between a Producer, Line Producer, and 
Assistant Producer? What is the difference 
between a Senior Programmer, Lead 
Programmer, and a Technical Lead? How much 
work should be contributed for an "Additional 
Programming/Art/Design" credit? How long 
should someone be involved with a project 
before receiving a full team credit? Is level 



building Art or Design? How should tools be 
credited? What about libraries? What about 
stock textures? Should we credit developers by 
specialty? By sub-specialty? Should there be 
"above the line credits", and if so, how should 
those be awarded? This is a focused 
roundtable to categorize how credits are 
currently being awarded around the industry, 
and to start looking at next steps in catego- 
rizing credits and developing recommended 
guidelines for crediting. 

Takeaway: Attendees come away with a better 
understanding of how credits are awarded at 
various studios and publishers around the 
industry, and of issues involved in assigning 
credits. 

Intended Audience: Professional developers 
and producers who have been through at 
least one full shipping cycle, especially if they 
have been in a position to decide on crediting 
for a game, or if they have been unsatisfied 
with the way credits were awarded. 

Roundtable - All 

IGDA Chapter Development 

Liz Wakefield See page 139 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 
San Carlos II, Hilton 
Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 
San Carlos I, Hilton 

Community-minded game developers 
volunteer to organize IGDA Chapters in cities 
around the world. Running a successful 
Chapter is hard work, but Chapter Organizers 
can learn from each others' successes and 
challenges. In this roundtable, Chapter 
Organizers discuss strategies to help IGDA 
Chapters better serve professional game 
developers. Specific issues to be addressed: 
how to plan compelling meeting agendas, 
effective meeting promotion, the importance 
of regular communication with Chapter 
members, how to recruit IGDA members at 
Chapter meetings, ideas to attract sponsors, 
and more. 

Takeaway: Ideas to improve IGDA Chapters. 
Strategies to address common Chapter 
challenges based on collective experience. 

Intended Audience: This roundtable is 
intended for current IGDA Chapter organizers, 
but anyone interested in starting an IGDA 
Chapter can benefit from listening to the 
discussion. 



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k. 



Panel - All 

IGDA Quality of Life White Paper Unveiling 

Scott Bonds, Dustin Clingman, Hank Howie, Francois Dominic Laramee, 

Greg LoPiccolo 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 
Salon IV, Marriott 

The IGDA Quality of Life Committee has spent the past several months 
preparing a White Paper on the causes and consequences of the 
industry's quality of life problems, including long hours, job insecurity, 
trouble maintaining a balanced life, and stress caused by uncontrollable 
projects, as well as some of the best ways that game studios and other 
companies have found to alleviate these problems and build better work 
environments. During this session, members of the Committee will 
present their findings to the community and solicit feedback to orient 
their 2004-2005 endeavors. 

Takeaway: The panelists share their findings on ways to organize teams, 
projects and companies in ways that maximize quality of life. 

Intended Audience: All developers committed to making the industry a 
more pleasant place to live and work. 

Group Gathering - All 
Journalists' Group Gatherings 
David Thomas See page 138 for bio 
Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 
IGDA Booth 

After a long slumber, game journalists are waking up to the realization 
that for games to mature, game writing and criticism must also grow 
up. Whether you write for a fan site or a mainstream publication, take 
the opportunity to check in with your hard-bitten journalistic peers. 
How can simple game reviewing grow into complex game criticism? 
How can game writers get more serious about what they do without 
taking the fun out of the subject? Is the bigger challenge to game 
journalism getting the industry to take what we do as more than 
product marketing, or getting our own editors to understand that video 
games are a beat worth consideration? Come down and share your war 
stories and moments of insight. Let's talk about writing about playing 
games! 

Takeaway: The goal of this meeting of the minds is to share thoughts 
about the current state of game journalism, the obstacles in the way of 
improving the art and craft of covering games, and to point out 
examples and people helping show the way. 

Intended Audience: Game journalists and writers, students interested in 
game journalism, and even like-minded industry analysts, in short, 
anyone who spends more time talking about the experience of games 
rather than the production of game titles gains from this discussion. 

Group Gathering - All 
Lawyers' Group Gathering 
Jim Charne See page 120 for bio 
Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 
IGDA Booth 

Attention: Lawyers who represent games industry clients - such as 
developers, publishers, middleware licensors, composers, artists, 



animators, programmers, designers, producers, agents. Come meet 
fellow practitioners in an informal setting at GDC so we can put a face 
to that email address or distant voice on the telephone. 

As deals get bigger and more complicated, we are seeing the emergence 
of an international games industry bar. Let's use this GDC opportunity 
and consider trends that may impact us as lawyers, as well as how we 
can all advance professionalism while continuing to serve clients to the 
best of our abilities. 

Takeaway: Bar association meetings and conferences have historically 
provided the opportunity for lawyers to discuss trends, issues, and new 
ideas in the law. This GDC session is the first time games industry 
lawyers from around the world will get together as a group in an 
informal discussion focusing on lawyers, the games industry, and the 
practice of law. 

Intended Audience: Lawyers and paralegals who work in, or have an 
interest in, the games industry. 

Lecture - All 

Learning by Design: Games as Learning Machines 

James Paul Gee See page 124 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

B2, Convention Center 

Good computer and video games are life-enhancing experiences. People 
enter new worlds and assume new identities. They become characters, 
rather than read about or watch them. They feel themselves extend into 
a virtual space where they can take personal risks beyond them in their 
daily lives. Computer and video games are more than entertainment in 
the modern world. They are a giant laboratory in which to discover new 
things about human motivation, emotions, values, and identity. In turn, 
such discoveries can lead to the design of deeper games. Good games 
are a laboratory, too, in which we can discover much about the nature of 
human learning and development. Whether they know it or not, the 
best game designers are also learning designers, designing spaces which 
entice people to think, feel, and learn in new ways. Good games are, in 
fact, "learning machines", devices that get themselves learned and 
learned well. Games like Deus Ex, Metroid Prime, Rise of Nations, and 
many others, are long and challenging. If few players managed to learn 
them, the companies that make them would fail. By necessity, good 
game designers have become adept at getting diverse learners to 
master their games, not by dumbing their products down, but by 
making them complex, intriguing, and yet learnable. Good computer 
and video games incorporate powerful learning principles into their 
designs, whether designers or players are aware of this or not. 
Furthermore, these principles turn out to be well supported by cutting- 
edge research on human learning, though they are exemplified in 
games much more powerfully than they are in today's schools and 
workplaces. At the same time, there are good reasons to believe that 
these learning principles are a large part of what makes people find 
good games "deep". In fact, future enhancements of games as learning 
machines can bring wider audiences to games and spread game 
technologies to wider uses in society. My talk discusses some of the 
learning principles good games incorporate and the ways in which this 
makes games life-enhancing for many players and can for many more. I 
also discuss the ways in which game designers and educators can work 
together to make game design an essential technology for thinking, 
feeling, and learning in modern life without killing games by making 
them "educational". 



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Takeaway: Good computer and video games 
are learning machines. Much of what makes 
them deep are powerful learning principles 
they surreptitiously use to get themselves 
mastered. Game technologies have the 
potential to transform learning and 
development in schools, communities, and 
workplaces. 

Intended Audience: Anyone interested in the 
role that games now play in society to 
enhance learning and human development 
inside families, communities, and schools -- 
and how this role can be yet further 
enhanced. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 

Long-Term Career Strategies: Advancing to 

the Next Level 

Ellen Beeman See page n8for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 

San Carlos I, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

San Carlos I, Hilton 

Are you already a professional in the game 
industry, but not sure how to achieve your 
long-term career goals? Facing some serious 
career challenges? This roundtable will be your 
chance to talk with game industry veterans 
who'll help you strategize over your current 
questions and plan for the future. Many of us 
enter the game industry with great career 
goals and ambitions, but no real 
understanding of how to achieve those long- 
term dreams. We've all heard the stories about 
the Vice President or the Executive Producer 
who started in QA and worked their way up, 
but once you've started in the game industry, 
what are the practical steps you can take to 
further your career? The goal in this session 
will be to allow developers to pose their 
questions directly to game industry veterans 
who have faced these same challenges. The 
problems that are addressed will depend on 
questions asked by the participants, but could 
include topics such as: how to be a great 
employee and someone that your company 
will value and promote, how to deal with 
situations at your company that could block 
your long-term career goals, methods for 
improving one's job and team skills and other 
techniques for guaranteeing job success, 
switching careers mid-track, how to know 
when it's time to leave a company, and an 
overall focus on long-term career planning. 
The participants in this roundtable should be 
working developers bringing questions or 
issues to be discussed, and industry veterans 
who would include game producers, Human 
Resources professionals, and others with 



practical and applicable game industry 
experience. 

Takeaway: Solutions for experienced 
developers who are facing specific problems in 
their careers, based on discussions with "old 
warhorse" veteran developers. The goal is 
useful, practical information that can 
immediately be applied to current situations 
and long- term planning for career goals. 

Intended Audience: Developers who have 
already successfully launched their game 
industry careers, but could use practical 
mentoring to achieve the next level in their 
careers. 

Lecture - All - Expo Pass Session 
Make Better Criticism: A Mature Form of 
Cultural Analysis 
Matteo Bittanti See page v8for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 
Salon IV, Marriott 

"If a tree falls in a forest and nobody hears it, 
does the tree make a noise? Does it even 
exist?" 

What does this classic philosophical dilemma 
have to do with video games? Nothing. 
Something. Everything. 

In this lecture, Matteo Bittanti argues that 
what the game industry really needs today is 
not (only) better games, but rather, better 
criticism. Whereas the production of games 
has made staggering advances in the last 
thirty years, the so-called professional game 
analysis has not really evolved. Rather, it 
regressed. Even today, the vast majority of 
video game magazines are simply "magalogs", 
consumer guides that talk about games in 
terms of their technical aspects, often relying 
on unintelligible, esoteric and self-referential 
argot. The professional game criticism does 
not really explain why games work, how 
games work and what effect they have on 
people. Will game criticism ever become a 
mature form of cultural analysis? Will it 
develop concise, systematic yet accessible 
concepts that apply to games, or will it remain 
a form of juvenile pastime? More importantly, 
can it become interesting for people who play 
games and for people who don't play (but 
always wanted to)? 

Takeaway: The GDC categorical imperative is 
"make better games." It's time for an update: 
"make better criticism."Why? Because if you 
can't explain if, why, how, and when the tree 
fell in the forest, nobody is going to care about 
the tree. This lecture provides some hints and 
tips on becoming better park rangers. 



Intended Audience: Game designers, game 
producers, game critics, and game players. In 
short, game people. 

Roundtable - Advanced 

Massively Excessive: Addiction or 

Irresponsibility? 

Damon Watson See page 139 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 

San Carlos I, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 

San Carlos II, Hilton 

The Massively Multiplayer Online Game 
("MMOG") stands just behind the violent 
video game on the public scrutiny firing line. 
Although there has not been a corresponding 
legislation explosion targeting the MMOG (as 
there has been with violent video games), 
today's MMOG has been blamed for failed 
relationships and marriages, bad parenting, 
even serious injuries and deaths (the 
Everquest Widows online discussion forum is 
riddled with these and other experiences). 

MMOG critics argue that game developers 
have designed MMOGs to be addictive and 
that it is from this design element that many, 
if not all of the alleged MMOG problems flow. 
The argument goes that but for the respective 
gamer's addiction to the MMOG, that 
particular gamer would pay more attention to 
his or her real life responsibilities. Some critics 
also claim that MMOGs should bear warning 
labels alerting buyers that MMOGs are 
addictive and not suitable for those with 
addictive personalities or related problems. 

Despite critical claims to the contrary, MMOG 
addiction has not been established as a 
diagnosable disorder. Many MMOG 
proponents argue that there is not, in fact, any 
such thing as MMOG addiction and that those 
who indulge in excess play do so almost 
purely out of irresponsibility. 

Lawsuits have been threatened and 
legislatures (at the local, state, and national 
levels) have demonstrated a willingness to 
promulgate anti-video game statutes with 
alarming speed and frequency; however, a 
large-scale public assault on the MMOG has 
yet to manifest. This roundtable will discuss (i) 
what developers and the industry can and/or 
should do (if anything) to stem the possible 
tide of anti-MMOG legislation or litigation and 
(ii) what developers and the industry can 
and/or should do (if anything) to help gamers 
play more responsibly- all of this with an eye 
toward maintaining integrity of game design 
and gameplay. 



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Takeaway: This roundtable discussion focuses on documented claims of 
MMOG excess and the resultant negative externalities, examine all sides 
of the debate (e.g., addiction vs. irresponsible gaming), provide a 
snapshot of anti-MMOG activity to date (including legislation, litigation, 
and support groups/ discussion forums), and field suggestions regarding 
what developers and the industry can and/or should do to address the 
issues. 

Intended Audience: This roundtable discussion is intended for anyone 
involved with MMOGs and have concerns over regulation, addiction, and 
other such negative externalities. 

Group Gathering - Beginner 
Newbie Artists' Croup Gathering 
Marc Mencher See page 131 for bio 
Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 
IGDA Booth 

An informal crash course on everything you need to know about having 
a successful career as a game artist. In this friendly, personal, and non- 
intimidating atmosphere you will learn how to research the market, 
meet the right industry people, access the unadvertised jobs, sell 
yourself, create the perfect demo/portfolio and resume, and profes- 
sionally handle interviews. Look for industry veterans to be on hand to 
chat with and learn from. 

Takeaway: The confidence and knowledge to not only get a job as a 
game artist, but to also manage a successful career. And also some new 
industry contacts. 

Intended Audience: Students, junior-level artists, and those looking to 
transition their art skills into the games market. 

Group Gathering - Beginner 
Newbie Designers' Group Gathering 
Marc Mencher See page 131 for bio 
Friday, March 26 • g-ioam 
IGDA Booth 

An informal crash course on everything you need to know about having 
a successful career as a game designer. In this friendly, personal, and 
non-intimidating atmosphere you will learn how to research the market, 
meet the right industry people, access the unadvertised jobs, sell 
yourself, create the perfect demo and resume, and professionally handle 
interviews. Look for industry veterans to be on hand to chat with and 
learn from. 

Takeaway: The confidence and knowledge to not only get a job as a 
game designer, but to also manage a successful career. And also some 
new industry contacts. 

Intended Audience: Students, junior-level designers, and those looking 
to transition their skills into the games market. 

Group Gathering - Beginner 
Newbie Programmers' Group Gathering 
Marc Mencher See page 73/ for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 
IGDA Booth 

An informal crash course on everything you need to know about having 
a successful career as a game programmer. In this friendly, personal, and 



non-intimidating atmosphere you will learn how to research the market, 
meet the right industry people, access the unadvertised jobs, sell 
yourself, create the perfect demo and resume, and professionally handle 
interviews. Look for industry veterans to be on hand to chat with and 
learn from. 

Takeaway: The confidence and knowledge to not only get a job as a 
game programmer, but to also manage a successful career. And also 
some new industry contacts. 

Intended Audience: Students, junior-level programmers, and those 
looking to transition their programming skills into the games market. 

Roundtable - All 

Practical Game Theory: Academics Fragging Developers 

Gonzalo Frasca See page 123 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

San Carlos II, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 4-spm 

San Carlos II, Hilton 

Game researchers who cannot tell Myth from Myst? So-called game 
theorists who never got fragged? Academics who never bought an 
import? Think again. Meet a new generation of gamers/academics who 
became game researchers for a very simple reason: they want to 
contribute to making better games. If you still have doubts come and 
test them on their game knowledge. And while you are at it, participate 
in an exchange between academic and industry players on what they 
can expect from each other and how they can implement a better 
collaboration. This panel reviews what has been done in video game 
research and theory during the last years, what is currently being done 
and which directions it may take in the future. Developers have specific, 
everyday needs that academics may not be able to fulfill. However, there 
also are other long-term game design issues that could be addressed by 
collaboration between scholars and developers. By bringing these two 
groups closer, this roundtable aims at helping them to know better 
what they can expect from each other. 

Takeaway: Academic study and theory could greatly contribute to game 
development if the industry establishes a partnership with it. A new 
generation of academics is passionate about games and they use that 
interest to explore new ways of taking the medium even further. 

Intended Audience: Both game developers and academics who want to 
explore new ways of collaboration. 

Roundtable - All 
Preserving Videogame History 
Simon Carless See page no for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • i2-ipm 
San Carlos II, Hilton 
Friday, March 26 • g-ioam 
San Carlos I, Hilton 

There are tens, possibly hundreds of thousands of archaic videogames 
released since the genesis of the games industry, more than 20 years 
ago. But until recently, they've been classed as ephemera, and no major, 
formal effort has yet been made to catalog and properly preserve them. 
So, we're going to be informally discussing the following questions: - 
What needs to be done to make perfect digital copies of archaic game 
software and related materials, for posterity? - What hardware and 



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software can we use to do this? - What 
metadata and associated information needs 
to be stored alongside the actual games? - Are 
we actually allowed to do it within US law, 
especially with regard to the DMCA? - How 
can we preserve development-based material 
not available to the general public, such as 
source code, original art assets, design docs, 
etc? - What lessons or resources can we use 
from fan-based, online projects? - Who should 
hold a master collection of archaic game 
software, how should it be stored and 
displayed, and what should it contain? 

Takeaway: Attendees get better 
understanding of how videogame history is 
slipping away, and what can be done to stop 
this from happening. 

Intended Audience: Those with an interest in 
preserving videogame history, and possibly 
some understanding of the technical means 
by which to do so. 

Roundtable - All 

Quality of Life: The Next Step 

Francois Dominic Laramee See page ug for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 

San Carlos I, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • iO:30-ii:3oam 

San Carlos I, Hilton 

The ICDA Quality of Life Committee invites 
developers to discuss their preoccupations 
with the current state of affairs in the 
industry Having completed its inaugural 
White Paper, the Committee will also solicit 
comments and suggestions on its 2004-2005 
projects. Join us if you have concerns and 
ideas to share with regard to developer quality 
of life. 

Takeaway: The participants share their 
experiences, discuss ways to make game 
development a more pleasant place to live 
and work, and provide input to the committee 
to orient their 2004-2005 endeavors. 

Intended Audience: All developers committed 
to making the industry a more pleasant place 
to live and work. 

Group Gathering - All 
Students' Group Gathering 
Alison Kelly See page njfor bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 
IGDA Booth 

Are you looking to network with other 
students and faculty from across the world? 
Or, are you a professional in the industry who 



would like to work with students and 
academics? 

This gathering is where students, academics, 
and professionals can come together to 
network with each other and discuss various 
issues and concerns. For students this is an 
outlet where you can gain insight from others 
on how to launch or expand a student 
chapter, finance your organization and how to 
work with your university, down to marketing 
and recruitment strategies. Also, find out 
about other student chapters and their 
direction and vision along with the successes 
and challenges they have faced. 

Professionals are encouraged to attend and 
network with the next generation of 
developers and game industry professionals. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave with strategies 
and a reference booklet for launching or 
growing a student IGDA chapter. Students, 
academics, and professionals are able to 
network with each other to build stronger 
ties. 

Intended Audience: All students, academics, 
and professionals interested in building 
stronger relations with each other are 
encouraged to attend. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 
Thievery or Flattery: Ethics and IP Rights 
Tobi Saulnier See page 136 for bio 
Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 
San Carlos II, Hilton 
Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 
San Carlos I, Hilton 

As the game industry matures and the stakes 
get higher, the role of intellectual property 
rights in defending and exploiting market 
success is increasing. We see plenty of new 
game request-for-proposals that make no 
bones about specifying exactly which game 
they want to copy; whether it is a wireless 
game copying a classic arcade game, or a fast 
follow "me too" console game. With the stakes 
growing higher in a turbulent industry, what 
previously would be simply accepted and 
perhaps dinged for being "derivative" now 
becomes a potential ethical issue and even a 
legal one. When is imitation flattery and when 
is it thievery? As game developers and 
publishers, the question of where the line is 
drawn, and how to know where it is now, has 
become more complex and risky. This 
roundtable focuses on the question of when 
being "derivative" is unethical or illegal, and 
when it is simply good business. 



Takeaway: Attendees come away with a 
deeper understanding of the state of the 
industry with respect to where the ethical and 
legal boundaries are now, and where they are 
moving. 

Intended Audience: The participants are 
assumed to have a basic knowledge of 
intellectual property rights in game 
development and be actively dealing with 
how to reconcile these legal and ethical 
limitations with the realities of the video 
game industry. 

Panel - All 

Towards Relevant Research: Collaboration 101 
Mark DeLoura, Robin Hunicke, Raph Koster, 
John Laird, Michael Van Lent, Will Wright 

See pages vj-i4ifor bios 
Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 
Salon IV, Marriott 

As increasing numbers of schools and univer- 
sities create programs for game studies and 
game research, the gap between applied work 
and theory becomes more apparent. What are 
the topic areas and research problems that 
developers would most like to see explored? 
What should students and researchers 
examine, measure, build and ponder in their 
stead? This panel of veteran developers 
discuss both technical and humanistic 
approaches to games research, weighing the 
pros and cons of specific approaches. In 
addition to evaluating current work, the 
panelists will discus their own pet projects 
and failed experiments, sharing insights about 
the areas most likely to benefit from 
extended, academic research. Discussion will 
balance"blue sky" thinking about potential 
projects and collaborations with honest, no 
frills talk about the realities of "keeping it 
relevant". 

Takeaway: Concrete feedback about current 
research and potential collaborations between 
academia and industry. The panel outlines 
strategic, high-level goals for technical and 
humanistic research as well as point out low- 
hanging fruit in specific research areas. 

Intended Audience: This session is intended 
for students, researchers, and developers who 
want to improve the focus and impact of 
academic games research. 



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Roundtable - All 

Violent Videogames: Threat or Menace? 

Daniel Greenberg See page 124 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:306:30pm 

San Carlos II, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

San Carlos II, Hilton 

New anti-videogame legislation seems to be increasing at the speed of 
Moore's law. This hot topic has never been more incendiary, with new 
state and federal laws criminalizing sales of violent videogames, 
mandating government enforcement of software ratings, and 
preventing games from depicting violence to law-enforcement officers. 
The government opened a new strategic front by funding a major study 
at the National Institutes of Health intended to measure the health 
effects of violent videogames on children. Senator Lieberman introduced 
the study saying "...beyond being offensive to our values, we should 
know whether this is helping to nurture misogynistic views and 
behaviors among young boys." Came makers are fielding more lawsuits 
from people attempting to link videogame violence to real-life horrors. 
Retail stores face more lawsuits over sales of games. And few people in 
the industry are untouched by the escalating issue. This roundtable will 
present the latest updates straight from the IGDA Violence and Social 
Issues Committee. Your questions and ideas are welcome as we work 
out issues from the developer's perspective. 

Takeaway: The roundtable provides updates on legislation, lawsuits, court 
battles, and other governmental reactions. The discussion will focus the 
sharing of ideas on what can be done about these events and issues. 

Intended Audience: This discussion is intended for all game developers. 

Group Gathering - All 
Women's Group Gathering 
Jessica Lewis See page i2gfor bio 
Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:30pm 
IGDA Booth 

Women in the game industry! Come "meet and greet" with other 
women who work on games. This is a time to network, share ideas, talk 
games and learn more about our professions. How can we make this 
industry more attractive to other women? Come share your opinion. Do 
you work on indie or commercial games? Come share your experiences. 
What kind of work culture exists at your office? Come share your stories. 
Are you thinking of trying something different within the industry? 
Come meet someone who is doing what you want to be doing. Do you 
want to mentor another woman as she breaks into the industry? Who 
mentored you? Come and offer your knowledge to others. 

This is a good time to meet people for the first time or to catch up with 
those you haven't seen since last GDC. 

Takeaway: Women attending this gathering should come away with a 
renewed sense of community and friendship as well as with new 
avenues to pursue for networking and support. 

Intended Audience: Calling all women in the industry! Whatever your 
discipline - designer, programmer, product manager, QA, writer, 
producer, aspiring game developer - time to get together to share ideas. 
All are welcome, whether full-time, part-time, contract, or student. 
Come contribute to a fast growing network of colleagues and profes- 
sional friends. 



Group Gathering - All 
Writers' Group Gathering 
Chris Bateman See page n8for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 
IGDA Booth 



With story and characters a demonstrated way to reach deeper into the 
mass market, the games industry stands at the threshold of a revolu- 
tionary new era - how can developers and publishers work better with 
professional writers, and how can writers integrate better into the 
development process? 

The newly founded IGDA Game Writers Special Interest Group invites 
you to come and discuss the nascent field of game writing. Now that 
we've published a white paper on the subject of game writing, what's 
the SIG's next step? Does the industry need and would they use a 
uniform script standard? How can writers and developers meet each 
other? Which of the possible non-linear narrative approaches will prove 
most robust and easy to integrate? How much game design experience 
does a writer need to function as a game writer? How can they best get 
that experience? What consequences do recent advances in audience 
demographics imply for the craft of game writing? 

Programming and art skills have become highly refined and impressive - 
it's time to make the same giant leaps in narrative design. We welcome 
constructive debate, and look forward to seeing you at this group 
gathering. 

Takeaway: Writing is a pretty solitary process -this is a chance to share 
experiences, techniques, and opinions. The shared objective is to work 
together to make better games. 

Intended Audience: This group gathering is intended primarily for game 
writers and writer-designers looking to meet with other people working 
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interest in game writing are welcome to attend. 



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THE ART & SCIENCE OF MAKING GAMES 




-81- 



PRODUCTION KEYNOTE 





Production Through Collaboration: Escalating Demands 
on the Producer 

David Perry 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 
A3, Convention Center 



In 2003, Shiny Entertainment shipped their most complicated production yet - Enter The Matrix for 
Atari. They released the game in all major languages worldwide, day and date with the theatrical 
release of The Matrix Reloaded from Warner Bros. Many gray hairs later, this keynote presents the 
tough lessons learned, tackling subjects ranging from the tricks that you can use to find or make a 
license, to getting taken seriously by Hollywood studios (even if you're not EA).The discussion delves 
into the specifics of how to approach a licensor or studio with your ideas, find the hook that will get 
their attention, deal with agents, keep the deal focused on what your team needs, and what to expect 
when you end up at a table with intellectual property and licensing attorneys. The keynote then 
focuses on the post-deal scenario, explaining the techniques Shiny used to handle A+ Hollywood talent 
(or how not to handle them), work with the film crew, capture and manage shared assets, deal with 
studio confidentiality, and manage the day to day relationship with the studio/licensor. Finally, the 
discussion focuses on production, relating how to plan to make money from the game, deliver on time, 
get marketing and PR support, pitch the game, get support from sales, actually make money from the 
game, hold onto a license, and plan for the future. 

David Perry 

David Perry is the president and founder of Shiny Entertainment, Inc. A 21-year game industry veteran, 
David launched his professional career at just 15 years of age by writing video game programming 
books in his native Northern Ireland. Since then, David has developed 32 games (serving as lead 
programmer on 24 of them), totaling 88 individual retail titles across 23 video game platforms. All told, 
David's games have totaled more than $500 million in retail sales. David sits on the Advisory Board of 
the Came Developers Conference and is a regular speaker at industry conferences, award shows and 
industry research organizations. His last project was Enter the Matrix, a #1 game made by working in 
close collaboration with the writer/directors of the Matrix universe, for more information visit: 
www.dperry.com, www.shiny.com, www.enterthematrixgame.com. 






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www.gdconf.com 



PRODUCTION TRACK 






Game production values are at an all time high and the demands upon game producers 
continue to grow. Producers must manage expanding development teams, skyrocketing budgets, 
larger games and a growing global market to create games that stand out from the crowd and 
find an audience. Production track sessions continue to offer proven tools and techniques to take 
a project from pre-production to shipping, on time and under budget. However, as dramatically 
more sales occur within the top 10 games, the Production track will help tighten a producer's 
focus by looking more clearly at the market and the resources needed to put out these games. 



Lecture - Intermediate 

Accurate Prediction and Other Organizational Myths 

Starr Long See page ugfor bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

A2, Convention Center 

The speaker describes strategies for organizing your project so that you 
can better allocate schedule, resources, and budgets. The speaker 
attempts to debunk standard organizational myths like accurate 
schedule prediction and massive pre-production. The speaker describes 
these topics from over 10 years of personal experience as both a QA 
tester and a producer. The speaker will emphasize the need for organi- 
zation and discipline in a maturing industry. 

Takeaway: Attendees come away from the lecture with an 
understanding of how to successfully manage a game from beginning 
to end. Attendees learn how to keep things simple and organized in 
order to achieve their goals. Attendees know what mistakes to avoid by 
learning which standard organizational practices are inappropriate for 
the interactive industry. Finally they come away with a set of strategies 
to help them make games, on time and on budget. 

Intended Audience: Attendees that most benefit from this lecture are 
managers who aredirecting and/or producing mid-size to large scale 
games. 

Lecture - All 

Artist Management in a Small Games Company 

Di Davies & Steve Derrick See page 121 for bios 

Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 

Bi, Convention Center 

This session focuses on the challenges and rewards of managing artist 
talent: preparing artists for platform changes, scheduling artists and 
capabilities for project allocation, career development, introducing 
structure, developing the artist's eye for quality, motivating artists to 
innovate, understanding accountability, responsibility and developing 
"big picture" perspective. 

Traditional techniques in developing game art must be coupled with 
technical aptitude and an awareness of what is coming up next. 
Keeping artists focused on doing a great job while balancing opportu- 
nities for growth is a significant challenge in a time when budgets are 
shrinking, scope is increasing and companies are just trying to get the 
job done. Artists are constantly challenged to take art standards to new 
levels of quality, and in the mad rush of project after project it is all too 



easy to find talented people slipping through the cracks. What are the 
strategies that can make it all work? What are the strategies that fail? 

Takeaway: Techniques and tips for anyone who manages art teams in 
small companies. 

Intended Audience: Artists, art managers, or those interested in learning 
more about art management. 

Lecture - Beginner 

Automation Recipes: Automation Ideas to Save Project Time and 

Money 

Jennifer Boespflug See page ngfor bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 

A2, Convention Center 

Throughout the game industry, many people think automation means 
"not applicable" or "too expensive." Game teams choose not to 
automate for several reasons: test lacks technical expertise, 
programmers prefer game coding instead of automation, or 
management does not have a cost benefit model for automation. 
However, several types of automation can reduce time or cost for many 
projects. This sessionintroduces the concepts behind game automation 
and walk through a cost-benefit model. People walk away with the 
ability to evaluate if automation makes sense for their team, along with 
some useful automation recipes: 

Random Input: Idle computers mean wasted resources. The cheapest 
way to put these to work is with random input automation. It can take a 
developer two days to create a tool to send random input to the game. 
Run this tool at night on everyone's machine to trap random crashes. 

Build Verification Tests: Broken builds and build verification tests can 
consume many hours over the course of a project. By writing 
automation that loads up each level, samples frame rate while 
teleporting to several locations in each level, and sends out e-mail with 
the results to the team, build stability increases and test time decreases. 
If a project lasts longer than a couple of months, money can be saved 
with some of these examples. 

Combat Matrix: How long does a combat matrix take to test? Many 
games never run a complete combat matrix of all character levels, all 
character classes, wielding all weapons, wearing all armor, casting all 
spells, against all enemies because there can be tens of thousands of 
tests. However, with a few simple test hooks, a complete automation 
matrix can become a quick nightly stress test within a couple of days. 



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PRODUCTION TRACK 



Takeaway: Attendees leave this presentation 
with the ability to evaluate if automation 
makes sense for their team, along with some 
useful automation ideas. There are several 
types of in-game automation that are simple 
to implement and will save most all projects 
both production time and money People learn 
how to implement a cost-benefit model for 
evaluating what types of automation will save 
their project money. People learn what types 
of testing tend to return the most value when 
automated (repetitive tasks like build verifi- 
cation tests, tasks requiring precision like 
performance benchmarking, localization). 

Intended Audience: The intended audience for 
this tutorial includes producers, game 
developers, QA testers and tool developers for 
all gaming platforms, including PC, Xbox, 
PlayStation and Camecube. There are no pre- 
requisites for this tutorial as it covers theory, 
design, implementation and deployment of 
game automation. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 

Being Competitive Without an Unlimited 

Budget 

Jeremy Longley See page ngfor bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:303:30pm 

E, Convention Center 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

E, Convention Center 

Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 

L, Convention Center 

Over the last year there has been an 
increasing trend for the likes of Electronic Arts 
to put 100+ people on the development of 
high-profile, guaranteed earners like LotR, 
Bond and Potter, with the focus of the team 
on hitting the street date, rather than the cost 
effectiveness of the development process 
itself. As the average cost of development of 
these high-profile AAA titles creeps ever closer 
to the $ioM mark, and the gap between the 
handful of 'unlimited budget' titles and 
everything else widens, how do the rest of us 
stay competitive? 

Idea Takeaway: A frank and open discussion 
about how to alter and restructure production 
methods to keep up. Some options include 
contract staff, outsourcing, floating staff 
between teams, licensing technology and 
content, co-marketing opportunities, or 
targeting specific market sectors; but are 
these enough, or do we need to be more 
radical in our approach to the design and 
development of games, and the shape of 
companies that create them? 



Intended Audience and Prerequisites: Anyone 
involved in the production of a game with a 
finite budget; anyone who has or who is 
interested in exploring alternatives to the 'one 
team in one room' approach to game 
development, or anyone who believes that this 
can still work. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Building Big Licensed Games with Big Teams 

Don Daglow See page 121 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 4-5pm 

Ji, Convention Center 

Big licenses require big teams, funded by 
companies that are playing for big stakes. You 
not only have more creative people developing 
the game, you have more business people 
trying to oversee and approve each step of the 
process. 

On The Lord of the Rings:The Two Towers, 
based on the Peter Jackson film, Stormfront 
Studios had over 50 team members working on 
the game. In addition to the usual specialized 
producers, EA dedicated major resources to 
making sure the asset supply lines and the 
feedback loop both functioned smoothly with 
individual and corporate licensors. 

How do we manage big teams, serve multiple 
masters and still produce high quality games? 
And how do we do it on especially rigid 
schedules because of the need to coordinate 
with hard-dated movies, TV shows, or other 
properties? 

This session shares how one major developer 
approaches this challenge. Some of the 
answers lie in philosophy and attitude, others in 
the minutiae of good processes and procedures. 
The audience helps guide where the discussion 
is focused in the second half of the hour in 
order to home in on specific relevant issues. 

Takeaway: Teams need to understand how 
licensor approvals work, and why the system 
actually does make sense. Passion can flourish 
on a team doing a licensed project, just as it 
can on an original. 

The phases of preproduction, demonstration, 
production and closing all place different 
stresses on big teams, and different demands 
on managers. Licenses place additional, 
incremental demands on each phase, 
demands that can be anticipated and planned 
for in the process. 

Intended Audience: Attendees who benefit are 
team leaders and project managers on 
licensed projects. Licensors and executives 



who wish to have a greater perspective and 
understanding of the development process on 
licensed titles. Project members within big 
teams who want to be a proactive force for 
quality and planning. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Creating a Monster RPG: The Light and the 

Dark Side of Development on Star Wars: 

Knights of the Old Republic 

Casey Hudson See page 126 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

A6, Convention Center 

BioWare's Star Wars: Knights of the Old 
Republic started development as an 
ambitious role-playing game set in the Star 
Wars Universe. In the end, it achieved almost 
all of its original design goals and went on to 
set sales records, becoming one of the most 
critically acclaimed RPGs of all-time. This talk 
will cover the entire development process at 
BioWare, from concept to completion, of this 
large and complex project. 

With a length of 40-60 hours, a complex rules 
system, 20,000 audio assets (including 14,000 
lines of spoken dialog) and a 90+ man-year 
schedule, the physical size of the game alone 
presented a significant challenge to the 
developers. Further challenges faced by the 
development team at BioWare involved 
complex testing efforts, licensing and approvals 
processes, the support of large-scale Marketing 
initiatives, managing co-development of two 
SKUs (Xbox and PC) and management of the 
BioWare online community. 

BioWare's producer/project director of Star 
Wars: Knights of the Old Republic discuss 
the challenges faced in development as well 
as the methods used to achieve the original 
design goals on this ambitious game while 
still keeping marketing, PR, and licensing 
responsibilities in balance. 

Takeaway: For audience members of all levels 
of experience, this presentation should 
provide insight into the development of a 
game with a unique combination of 
challenges. The ideas and methods discussed 
in the presentation will be applicable to game 
projects of any size. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Developing and Mastering 36 Different 

Sku's of One Title Simultaneously for the 

PS2 & Xbox 

Gavin Cheshire See page 120 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 

A2, Convention Center 



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www.gdconf.com 




PRODUCTION TRACK 



Club Football 2004 was Codemasters first foray into the Soccer action 
genre. The title was developed for simultaneous release on October loth 
2004. Sounds easy? 18 different sku's per soccer club on both PS2 & Xbox 
- 36 in all! The lecture covers the trials and tribulations of developing 
multi-platform product centered around a core game which is then re- 
skinned as different versions. 

Takeaway: Production orientated this lecture is aimed at the 
development/production community and how to handle multiple sku 
development. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
The Easy Route To Console Online 
Shawn Hargreaves See page 125 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 
A7, Convention Center 

A discussion of the various options for an Xbox or PS2 online title, 
ranging from fully fledged multiplayer to a simple online scoreboard or 
a few extra downloadable levels. How much code do you have to write 
to support each of these online features, how long does it take, and 
what kind of things tend to go wrong? To what extent can you rely on 
existing server features and client-side libraries versus developing your 
own from scratch, and what are the quality implications of this? How 
can you leverage fan websites and existing online communities to add 
depth without requiring any specific new game features at all? 

Takeaway: There are many options in the online world, ranging from full 
multiplayer support to just a simple hiscore table. What are the choices, 
how long do they take to implement, and how much do you really gain 
from each of the possible features? 

Intended Audience: Anyone interested in adding online support to their 
game, especially where that might not be the main focus of their 
project. This is a high-level overview, but could be of interest to some 
programmers as well as producers. 

Lecture - All 

Growing a Dedicated Tools Programming Team: From Baldur's Gate 

to Star Wars Knights of the Republic 

Don Moar See page 737 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 

Fi, Convention Center 

As BioWare's games become more complex, having fast, stable and easy 
to use content creation and asset management tools becomes 
increasingly important. From Baldur's Gate to Neverwinter Nights to 
Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic and beyond, each project has 
required more from its tools than the last. Enter the tools programmers. 
These people form the group whom BioWare's designers, artists and, in 
some cases, even game programmers depend upon to help them make 
their games. The primary mandate of this group is to help the teams 
manage their vast quantities of game data in a safe, reliable and 
efficient manner. 

The approach to tools programming at BioWare has changed signifi- 
cantly since 1996, when the company was founded. Until 1999, tools 
were created by one of the game programmers. At that point, a formal 
team was created where specialized programmers would be assigned to 
focus on tools development over the long term and across all new 
projects. Starting with two, the team has now grown to sixteen 
programmers working on four projects. Their responsibilities include 



writing content creation tools for the art and design teams, and the 
end-user, asset management tools for the resource pipeline and 
localization process, and change tracking tools for the QAteam. 

The right tools delivered at the right time during the project will help 
your team stay focused on the product and hopefully allow them to 
complete it sooner and at less cost. This lecture describes how the 
lessons learned managing the growth in size and changing roles and 
responsibilities of the BioWare tools team can be applied to your project 
and company. In addition, it details some of the mistakes that have been 
made during that time and how similar problems may be prevented in 
the future. 

Takeaway: This lecture is about getting the right people to write the right 
tools at the right time for your project. The attendee can expect to get 
some advice on how to do so and see some of the consequences of failure 
without having to experience them first hand. The attendee also are given 
some suggestions on how to manage the tools development process. 
Finally, the attendee may find some new ways to make their development 
teams more productive by giving them ideas for new tools. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The Impact of Middleware Technologies on Your Game Development 

Julien Merceron See page 77 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 

A2, Convention Center 

Your position regarding Middleware has a serious consequence on the 
way you handle the different phases of your development, resources and 
manage the risks. First, the speaker hightlights the Strategical issues 
behind using Middleware, he will then, according to Ubisoft experience 
& attitude, answer questions such as: the impact it has on the different 
phases of your Project Life Cycles, the effect on quality /time/budget 
parameters, the profile of the developers you need, how to select your 
Middleware, etc. War and Peace stories are told both from a production 
and technology standpoint, to highlight the keypoints. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The Interface: How to Create an Effective Audio Schedule 

Alex Brandon See page ngfor bio 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

A2, Convention Center 

Audio is rapidly becoming as high-budgeted an item in games as it is in 
films. Process and technology are changing just as rapidly. What once 
was viewed as a task that involved the creation of a few hundred files by 
one person to pass to programmers for implementation is now a full 
fledged chunk of the game development pie requiring careful planning. 
The presenter went through an eye-opening and educational gauntlet 
with the development of the audioinDEusEx: Invisible War, and 
through this session he shares a variety of production options from his 
experience. 

Takeaway: Producers gain a clear plan of what to do during the pre- 
production, production, and post-production of the game development 
cycle. They are also able to manage resources more effectively and create 
more compelling audio as a result. 

Intended Audience: Producers, lead programmers, project directors, and 
audio directors. 



7 



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PRODUCTION TRACK 



Lecture - Intermediate 
Managing the Hydra: Successfully Running 
Multiple Projects in a Videogame Studio 
Ray Muzyka & Greg Zeschuk 

See pages 732 & 747 for bios 
Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 
A7, Convention Center 

This talk details BioWare's approach to 
developing multiple concurrent projects in a 
dynamic and challenging environment. The 
company currently runs between five to seven 
simultaneous projects with a staff of close to 
one hundred and seventy people. BioWare's 
past titles include multiple million-selling 
titles such as the Baldur's Gate series (on the 
PC), the Neverwinter Nights series, and Star 
Warsr: Knights of the Old Republic. BioWare 
is currently hard at work on Jade Empire, an 
upcoming Xbox RPC, plus several other as-yet 
unannounced major projects for PC and 
console. BioWare has had a very low staff 
turnover of approximately 3% annually, 
averaged over the past nine years the 
company has been in operation. The company 
has also approached growth very carefully 
since its inception and has received many 
growth and business awards (such as 
appearing multiple times in D&T's North 
American Fast 500 growth companies list). 
BioWare's two founders discuss the methods 
they used to create an environment capable of 
generating multiple simultaneous 'AAA' games 
while still managing to keep BioWare 
independent, growing, and profitable, as well 
as a good place to work. 

All of the methods described in this talk are 
grounded in common sense, and the 
approaches described are flexible enough that 
they can be modified to suit the specific 
situations other studios may be faced with. 

Takeaway: The talk examines topics like 
identifying company goals, setting company 
values, aligning a company's culture with its 
goals, deciding on the specific structure of the 
studio, building rules of operation for the 
studio, and setting up communication 
systems that are responsive and objective, and 
describes the details of systems appropriate 
for different sized companies, not only for 
large developers, but also for small and 
medium, sized developers. 

Intended Audience: Studio heads and 
producers at independent developers, 
producers and senior managers at internal 
development studios of publishers, or 
managers or project leads at any rapidly 
growing company (be it developer or 



publisher). Production and/or management 
experience at a developer, or an interest in 
studio or project management. 

Roundtable - Beginner 

Managing the OA Process 

Chuck McFadden See page 730 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • g-ioam 

D, Convention Center 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

Plaza, rlilton 

Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 

D, Convention Center 

What does the OA department do, and is there 
a better way to do it? This roundtable 
examines a variety of OA philosophies and 
how they can be applied in today's market. It 
explores ways to build OA teams without 
falling into standard traps along the way, as 
well as improving the developer-tester 
relationship. 

Takeaway: Attendees gain and understanding 
of QA's nature and how that nature might 
evolve in the changing market. Attendees 
learn how to organize OA teams better and 
improve methods of communication between 
them and all members of development. 

Intended Audience: All game development 
professionals (not just OA people) can benefit 
from this rountable. No prerequisite 
knowledge is necessary in order to contribute 
to the discussions. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Master Your Game's Domain: Data-Driven 

Asset Management 

Rick Holtrop See page 126 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 

Bi, Convention Center 

This session covers areas of asset 
management for both single-player games, 
and massively-multiplayer client/server 
applications. It shows how to use a database 
to foster an environment where content can 
come online quickly, with little to no 
intervention by programmers who have long 
ago finished a game system. The speaker looks 
at procedures by which artists, designers, and 
translators can submit their work on their 
own time. Most importantly, this presentation 
points out specific techniques that can 
provide easy avenues of content creation and 
management over long years of live service. 

In the first segment of the session, the 
speaker presents some possible definitions of 
"game assets," and continues on to explore 



some different stages of their existence 
during development. He discusses ways of 
storing these assets, how to let game code 
know of their readiness, ways to leverage 
further definition and management, and 
white-glove techniques as they are readied for 
prime time. The speaker also discusses using a 
game database as an always-up-to-date 
documentation resource. Through the power 
of SQL (the database standard for communi- 
cation), data can be mined more quickly and 
efficiently than other storage techniques (text 
files, Excel documents, game code). 

In the second segment of the session, the 
speaker follows an example set of assets 
through a life-cycle. He begins where they are 
born from artists, raised and taught by 
designers and programmers, and disciplined 
by quality assurance. With the correct 
application of tools, live teams and producers 
can serve as omnipotent watchers over the 
data that, in essence, is the game. 

At the end of the hour, attendees leave having 
experienced the life-cycles of some example 
assets. They have a better understanding of 
the important milestones in an asset's 
creation, and they realize the benefits that a 
data-driven approach can offer. 

Takeaway: Attendees are presented with 
practical examples of implementing data- 
driven designs in an MMORPG.They gain an 
appreciation of the steps necessary to make a 
game work under these circumstances, along 
with a better sense of direction when 
beginning a project. Further resources for 
study and reference are provided, as well as 
personal contacts for additional direction. 

Intended Audience: Most people involved in 
PC game development should find points of 
interest throughout the session. A basic 
understanding of any part of the creation 
process, or an interest in databases, serves as 
solid grounding for the discussion. No 
fundamental training in database software is 
necessary, as simple concepts are used 
throughout. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 

MMO Communities: Fans and Flames 

Kevin O'Hara See page 732 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • i2-ipm 

E, Convention Center 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 

L, Convention Center 

Friday, March 26 • iO:30-ii:3oam 

E, Convention Center 



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PRODUCTION TRACK 



Massively Multiplayer Online Games can find extended life through 
well-managed communities or a painful demise from a "pit of despair". 
In this focused roundtable, we will explore issues such as how do deal 
with grief forum posters, what website tools are most useful, and how 
to most effectively involve your dev team with the player community. 
We'll also discuss the different goals of pre-launch, beta and live game 
communities. Bring your community success stories and words of 
warning to this open discussion. 

Takeaway: Attendees should learn the following from the roundtable: 
The difference between a pre-launch community, beta community and 
live product community. How to engage the community and direct their 
collective energy. How best to deal with individuals intent on disrupting 
a community. What tools work best in community management. 
Success and failures of other attendees with regards to community 
management 

Intended Audience: Should have interest in or direct involvement with 
online communities for massively multiplayer or large-scale online games. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Producing Motion Capture and Animation 

Jarrod Phillips & Tom Tolles See pages 133 & 138 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • g-ioam 

Bi, Convention Center 

This session deals with producing high quality motion capture on time 
and on budget. Time and preparation mean money when it comes to 
motion capture. The speaker discusses how you can plan ahead, 
coordinate the shoot, direct the actors, obtain props, deal with wire rigs 
(for certain kinds of stunts), etc., to get the most of your shoot. Time and 
money-saving techniques for looping and blending moves as well as 
matching skeletons, reviewing and ordering moves, and maintaining 
motion libraries are also discussed. 

Panel - Intermediate 

Producing Orchestral Scores for Games 

Scott Cuthbertson, Chuck Doud, Simon Pressey, Steve Schnur, 

Tommy Tallarico, Chance Thomas, Jack Wall See pages 117-141 for bios 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

Salon I & II, Marriott 

In this panel, the speakers discuss making orchestral scores for games a 
reality from the point of view of the producer.The topics include how an 
orchestral score might benefit your game, developing and selling the 
budget, working with your composer to make an immersive and 
interactive score, choosing the orchestra, exploring the cross- 
promotional potential of an orchestral soundtrack and the added 
revenue from selling the soundtrack CD or publishing money collected 
from ASCAP & BMI. Key points to be addressed are the specific 
production methods, the standards of excellence and how an acute 
attention to detail is required to reach any degree of success in an 
orchestrated soundtrack. 

Takeaway: All the info and data you'll ever need to help green light a live 
orchestra into your budget. 

Intended Audience: Producers who are interested in using a live 
orchestra for their project. Composers who would like to get additional 
information to use as artillery to score their next game. 



Lecture - Intermediate 

Producing Programmers: Strategies for Managing Technical Staff 

James Vlad Ceraldi See page 120 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

Fi, Convention Center 

Many producers who have a non-technical background run into 
technical hurdles when trying to manage programmers. It's difficult to 
arrange the development of a steam train when you don't really 
understand technically how to make a steam train. How long will it take 
to create the engine? What's the best way to go about it? How do you 
know when a programmer is misleading you? How do you know when 
to worry? When is it time to bring in support? How do you manage risk? 
How do you cope with programmer turnover? What are the pitfalls of 
using middleware? Why do programmers sometimes turn into 
bottlenecks? What team structures can help overcome bottlenecks? 
How do you communicate with programmers, give feedback, and track 
their progress? What are some tried and true techniques for task 
estimation? Can design reviews and code reviews help? How can you 
break down communication barriers between programmers, artists, and 
designers? 

In addition to answering these questions, the presenters delve into 
some common programmer myths and syndromes: 

- Not invented here 

- The mythical man month 
-The black box syndrome 
-The loner 

- Goldplating 

- The black hat syndrome 

- Rewriting everything 

Takeaway: After attending this talk, you take away some battle-tested 
strategies for managing technical staff, delivered by two producers who 
are former programmers. 

Intended Audience: Attendees are professional game developers who 
have shipped at least one game, and are involved in the management of 
technical staff. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Re-awakening a Classic: Prince of Persia: A Case Study 

Yannis Mallat See page 130 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 

Ji, Convention Center 

While still beloved by many, the Prince of Persia franchise was to be 
buried into oblivion when one up-rising studio started to blow off the 
dust. Lying below were tremendous efforts of a team, confidence & 
doubts under pressure, clear goals & fuzzy means, creation & multi- 
platform production management and the most humane adventure 
epic. Therefore, the Flame could light the Shadow for good. 

How did we approach such a license? How, from deep within the 
concept, can we guarantee a game that is deserving of the original 
legacy? And how to ensure the success of 15-years; could it really survive 
the technology? 



% 



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PRODUCTION TRACK 



The session shares how the Prince of Persia 
team overcame these challenges, while 
keeping a backbone methodology and 
production process. Maintaining the right 
balance of creation versus production is 
among the answers. 

But it raises a more fundamental question. As 
Hollywood is cashing in on big remakes, it 
seems more difficult for video games . . . What 
are remakes and their chances of success in 
our industry? 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Republic: Lessons Learned 
Demis Hassabis See page us for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 
Fi, Convention Center 

Republic was a large, original and 
outrageously ambitious project built on a 
newly created platform of cutting edge 
technology. It was also the first game 
produced by Elixir Studios as a company and 
had the added pressure of garnering a coveted 
Edge front cover early in its lifecycle. In 
hindsight, taking these factors into consid- 
eration, it was not altogether surprising that 
we came up against several major issues 
during the course of development and as a 
result the game experienced serious slippage. 
These issues occurred in a diverse range of 
areas from dealing with investors, to 
evolutionary design, to innovative technology, 
to company structure. Although it was a very 
long and difficult road we managed to 
overcome all these problems to finish the 
game. Republic might not have ended up 
being the epic we had initially hoped for but it 
is still a unique game, something that not 
many can claim to have done, and one we are 
all very proud of. 

However, perhaps more important than 
releasing the game was what we learnt from 
the experience. During the protracted 
development of the game Elixir went through 
many major changes with regards to 
development philosophy and structure. The 
benefits of these improvements are being 
reaped today with the exceptionally smooth 
progress of our next projects, the first of 
which is Evil Genius. So Elixir continues to 
thrive, and is all the better for the traumatic 
growing pains it experienced. This talk 
presents in detail the mistakes made, the 
issues faced, and the solutions decided on. 

Takeaway: How to avoid some of the pitfalls 
of creating ambitious cutting edge games as a 
relatively small independent and live to tell 
the tale 



Intended Audience: Anybody involved in the 
production of big original games, people 
interested in start-ups, designers of innovative 
games, programmers creating cutting edge 
technology. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Requirements for a Next Generation 
Massively Multiplayer Online Game 
Gordon Walton See page 739 for bio 
Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 
J2, Convention Center 

Though there have been more massively 
multiplayer online game launches, none can 
yet be called next generation beyond the old 
stand-bys of Ultima Online and Everquest. 
This session outlines the presenter's 
requirements for a next generation MMOC. 
This covers service recommendations along 
with specific design and development 
requirements. 

Takeaway: The attendee understand what 
specific features and services define a next 
generation massively multiplayer game from 
the speakers point of view. 

Intended Audience: A knowledge of massively 
mulitplayer games currently on the market. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Seven Years of Max Payne 
Markus Maki See page no for bio 
Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 
Bi, Convention Center 

The lecture looks back to the seven years of 
development of the two Max Payne games 
and the brand, touching Remedy's evolution 
on the way as well. The talk addresses 
development mostly from the project leads' 
aspect, outlining some of the tools, production 
methods and ways of working Remedy uses as 
well as digging up the past for often 
humorous examples of what definitely should 
not be done. Additionally, the talk looks at 
some of the key elements on how the Max 
Payne franchise has evolved and how the 
brand has been built from the ground up. 

Takeaway: The attendees get to hear fun 
stories and larger scale challenges there have 
been during the development of Max Payne 
and The Fall of Max Payne, and get some 
insight on the approach the team has taken to 
successfully complete the games. 

Intended Audience: Anyone who is interested 
to hear the story on how the Max Payne brand 
was built and how a small startup developer 
evolved during the process. No prerequisite 
knowledge is necessary. 



Lecture - Intermediate 

SOCOM II: Creating a Compelling Online 

ConsoleGame 

Seth Luisi See page 130 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 

Bi, Convention Center 

With the mass market acceptance of online 
console gaming comes all new challenges. 
Console game developers are now faced with 
the difficult task of creating not just an 
innovative and cutting edge single player game, 
but also an in-depth, easy to use and compelling 
online game experience. Using the practices and 
lessons learned during the creation of SOCOM: 
U.S. Navy SEALs and the sequel SOCOM II as an 
example, this lecture will focus on how to 
overcome the online console gaming frontier. 
The topics to be covered include managing the 
resources conflict between single player and 
multi-player, creating a competitive online 
game, designing an online Ul which a console 
player will understand and the challenges and 
pitfalls of developing an online console game. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 

Tools and Tool Development: Production 

Track 

John Walker & Dave Weinstein 

See pages 139 & 140 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 
D, Convention Center 
Thursday, March 25 • 4:15-5:^1x1 
D, Convention Center 
Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 
D, Convention Center 

Traditionally, it's been common for tools to be 
considered scutwork, assigned to junior 
programmers, and with low requirements for 
stability and usability. Modern games require 
dedicated tools programmers, or even entire 
tools teams. What are the issues involved in 
dedicated tools production, tools groups, and 
how do you handle tool development that 
supports multiple projects, often on multiple 
platforms, and increasingly across 
development studios? 

Takeaway: A better understanding of the 
issues involved in scaling from dedicated tools 
programmers inside of game projects to 
dedicated tools groups. 

"Best practices" to keep a tools group from 
being treated as a "spare programmer holding 
tank" rather than a serious part of game 
development. 

How to better facilitate the communications 
between tools developers and the teams that 

See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



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www.gdconf.com 



PRODUCTION TRACK 




are using them. "Best practices" on supporting a common tool across 
multiple projects (usually with very different milestone and ship dates) 
and multiple platforms. 

Ways to build maintainable tools provided do what the clients (in this 
case, the artists and designers, and occasionally engineers) want, and in 
a way that they find easy to use. 

Intended Audience: Producers, tools group managers, and engineering, 
art, and design leads. Experience with existing tools and product 
lifecycles is desired, as that provides a baseline as to the state of tools in 
shipping games. 

Round-table - Advanced 

User Created Content: Is it worth it? 

Trent Oster See page 133 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 

Plaza, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 •g-ioam 

D, Convention Center 

Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 

D, Convention Center 

User created content. Sounds like a nice concept doesn't it? It's free 
content right? Not quite. There are some substantial costs associated 
with user created content and supporting your content creators. This 
roundtable serves as a forum to discuss our collective experiences in 
supporting user created content and the decisions made along the way. 
The moderator directs the discussion and relate relevant experiences 
from the development and ongoing support of Neverwinter Nights. The 
discussion touchs on the possible implementations of user created 
content in various game genres and the challenges involved 

Takeaway: The atendee should come away from the session with an 
appreciation of the challenges associated with supporting user created 
content leading up to and following release. 

Intended Audience: The intended audience for this discussion includes 
developers who have supported user created content in that past and 
anyone debating supporting user created content in a current or future title. 

Lecture - Intermediate - Expo Pass Session 

User-testing in a Hostile Environment: Overcoming Apathy and 

Resistance in Game Companies 

Bill Fulton & Ramon Romero See pages 123 & 135 for bios 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-ii:3oam 

J3, Convention Center 

The importance of formal user-testing methods (i.e., methods developed 
by psychologists and HCI/Usability researchers for testing products with 
consumers) as a means of improving games in development has been a 
growing topic of interest among game developers in the past few years. 
However, mere anecdotes and examples of the value of these methods 
are unlikely to get a game company or publisher to 'dip a toe in' and 
even investigate these formal methods; getting them to 'take the 
plunge' and make large changes to the standard game development 
process that increase costs can be seemingly impossible and take years. 

The primary goal of this talk is to share some insight in ways to 
advocate user-testing in a company where important staff may be 
apathetic or resistant to changing from the usual development process. 
The secondary goal is to share some guidelines for how to create user- 



testing processes that raise the likelihood that user-testing will 'catch on' 
and eventually become integrated in the standard development cycle. 

This talk is the 3rd in series on user-testing and games, and is designed 
for an audience that understands the basic concepts of user-testing, 
believes that they are valuable, and wants to begin 'evangelizing' user- 
testing to a company that is apathetic or even hostile to the idea. This 
talk does NOT make the case that user-testing is useful, go into detail on 
specific user-testing methods or show anecdotes from real gamers, 
because that was covered in two previous GDC talks. Both talks can be 
downloaded at www.microsoft.com/playtest/publications.htm. 

This talk is a case study from two of the four founding members of the 
Games User-testing Group at Microsoft Game Studios, which does user- 
testing on all titles that Microsoft develops or publishes. They have help 
grow the group from 1 researcher in 1997 to 37 in 2003. 

Takeaway: Members of the audience takeaway opinions and insight for 
how to overcome significant apathy or resistance about the idea of 
doing user-testing in a game company. The audience also gets principles 
for how to increase the likelihood that early user-testing efforts are 
successful, and prove their value. 

Intended Audience: The intended audience for this talk is anyone who is 
already convinced of the value of user-testing and is looking to 
"evangelize" it and have it play a greater role in a game development 
company or publisher. Designers, producers, and managers trying to 
advocate user-testing in their company, and HCI/usability professionals 
trying to break into the games business should find it useful. Having at 
least a conceptual understanding of the value of user-testing is 
necessary for this talk to be informative. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Using External Contractors Effectively 

Marc Aubanel See page ny for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 

Bi, Convention Center 

Have you ever been faced with project challenges that have exceeded 
the capacity of your team? Have you ever had the uneasy feeling that 
you don't have the best internal solution to all of you development 
needs? Are you unhappy with the quality level of certain aspects of your 
game? Have you ever been faced with timeline or budget challenges 
that put too great a strain on your internal development team? I will be 
presenting the advantages and the pitfalls to using external 
development for artwork, canned sequences, & audio all the way to 
complex engineering solutions with external groups. 

Takeaway: This lecture is for anyone involved with the production or 
management of games. Feel more confident in using external 
contractors in the making of your next game. 

Lecture - All 

Wallace and Gromit in Project Zoo: A Postmortem of a Licensed, 

Cross-Platform Game 

David Braben See page ngfor bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 3~4pm 

A7, Convention Center 

This talk looks at the issues arising out of delivering a licensed platform 
adventure game in today's mature but cutthroat climate. It addresses 
things that went wrong, things that went right, and how the team 
managed to stay on schedule and on budget. 



-89- 



PRODUCTION TRACK 



The game was developed in an unconven- 
tional way, where the design was allowed to 
evolve through the project without the 
associated slippage. It was also fully cross- 
platform development. The talk examines how 
this was acheived,the use of tools, 
technologies (such as 13,000 polygon in-game 
character models on the PS2) and includes 
demonstrations of the development process 
and the game itself. 

Finally it looks at the flexibility needed to 
work with a licensor, and the importance of 
this relationship. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn the factors that 
made this game's development process work 
well, and the things that didn't really matter. 
They also learn the importance of the 
developer/publisher/licensor relationships, 
and the mistakes to avoid. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Winning the Race Against Pirates and 
Crackers: Next Generation Copy Protection 
Erik Simon See page 137 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 
Bi, Convention Center 



It seems that the game industry has given up 
the race against crackers and the software pirate 
scene. Patches to remove copy protections (so 
called "cracks") and binary images of complete 
games are available for download simulta- 
neously with the release of a game or even 
earlier. It has been this way for many, many 
years and most industry executives seem to 
have quietly accepted that there is no workable 
copy protection method. 

This leciure shows ways to even the odds in the 
war against piracy. It shows how to build 
individual software obfuscation on top of 
existing copy protection vendors that are able to 
withstand attacks for about three to four weeks, 
the critical time window in which most of the 
sales are made. The presented methods are 
already proven in the wild. 

While some technology is discussed, the lecture 
is also shedding some light on the current state 
of the piracy underground, why the pressure of 
illegal copying is currently much more critical 
then ever before, and how a personnel structure 
and project planning is chosen to implement 
advanced software obfuscation without 
delaying the development team. 



Takeaway: Attendees gain understanding of 
individual copy protection methods that are 
able to withstand attacks for several weeks 
and how to set up a department in a 
development or publishing organisation 
which can develop this technology. They take a 
look at the inner workings of the software 
piracy scene. And they might be surprised to 
learn that there are indeed ways to achieve 
what most people in the industry stopped 
hoping for: having the most important, initial 
sales window free of pirate copies. 

Intended Audience: This session is intended 
for lead and senior level developers and 
publishing executives seeking answers about 
a high-end, working and compatible CD or 
DVD based copy protection or client based 
non-online protection in general. 
Programming and technical knowledge is not 
a prerequisite, except for small part of the 
lecture describing the principles of advanced 
copy protection. The session has a focus on 
the PC as the platform where piracy is most 
widespread, but all discussed methods can be 
applied to console formats. 




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-91- 



PROGRAMMING KEYNOTE 





A Candid Look at the Issues and Rewards of 
Bleeding Edge Engine Development 

John Carmack 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 
Civic Auditorium 



Keynote attendees go inside the mind of industry visionary, John Carmack, for a candid and topical 
discussion about game development, technology, and the ideas that feed his appetite for innovation. 

Among other topics, John addresses two central themes: architectural strategy and entropy in the 
development process, and orders of magnitude relating to Doom 3. He'll elaborate on how id 
Software's highly-anticipated title chews up one million times the power that Shadowforce, his first 
game title, did and explain why he's looking forward to the next million. 



John Carmack 

John Carmack, the technological patriarch and co-founder of id Software, is responsible for some of the 
most compelling and successful PC game titles of all time, targely self-taught, John cranks out the 
most in-demand and technically mind-boggling 3D graphics engines in existence. These engines, which 
are licensed by leading game development companies, are found at the heart of all id Software titles, 
from the revolutionary Wolfenstein 3D and blockbuster Doom to the successful Quake and the 
newest smash hit Return to Castle Wolfenstein. A "technology purist," John's devotion to pushing the 
limits of hardware and software to their bleeding edge and beyond fuels id's development team to 
create games that exceed even their wildest expectations. Almost single handedly responsible for the 
advent of the first-person adventure/shooter genre of gaming, John and the id Software team have 
proven themselves to be ahead of the curve in almost every respect. With games like the Quake series 
and Doom (the second best-selling computer game of the 90's) to his credit, it is clear that John is more 
than a technological visionary, but also a cultural trendsetter. Before co-founding id Software in 1991, 
John worked at Softdisk Publishing. In his spare time, John oversees the design, construction and 
launch of guided rockets through his other venture Armadillo Aerospace. He also enjoys theoretical 
math and physics research. 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of GDC 2004. 



* 



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www.gdconf.com 



PROGRAMMING TRACK 





As platforms mature, it takes more effort than ever to produce a game that will capture the 
attention of the public and press. The challenges facing a programmer in 2004 are no longer 
how to build systems, but how to build systems that create dense, cinematic, and reactive 
environments that push the envelope both technically and artistically. The Programming track 
focuses on the challenges facing game developers working in today's market - mature consoles, 
a highly competitive sales environment and increased demand for very high production values in 
games - and prepares programmers for the technology of the next generation. 



Sponsored by Trymedia 

ActiveMARK Tutorial 

Mike Pohl & Andres Torrubia See pages 133 & 138 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 

C4, Convention Center 

In-depth tutorials designed to optimize the developer and end-user 
experiences with the most powerful game protection available. Learn 
specific ways to use the ActiveMARK SDK and Packaging tools: 

See the step-by-step real-time process for packaging an application, 
including setting trial criteria, modifying in-game pages and end-user 
experience. Create user interfaces that will integrate seamlessly with 
the look and feel of your game. Set up custom business rules using the 
ActiveMARK SDK. 

Takeaway: A step-by-step 'how to' on using the ActiveMARK 
development tools. 

Intended Audience: Programmers who implement in-game security for 
PC games. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Adding Spherical Harmonic Lighting to the Sushi Engine 

Christopher Oat See page 132 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 

A3, Convention Center 

Spherical Harmonic (SH) based lighting solution have entered the 
mainstream of real-time graphics. This relatively new lighting technique 
offers many advantages to engine programmers in both performance 
and advanced lighting realism. 

The internal engine and shader library that ATI's demo team uses for 
their cutting edge technology demos will be the case study on how to 
add support for SH lighting to a real-time graphics environment. This 
session will discuss artist usability, the preprocess tool chain, and 
runtime issues and solutions they have encountered while adding SH 
lighting support to their tools, shader library, and engine. 

Takeaway: Attendees gain an insight into the various steps necessary to 
add spherical harmonic lighting to their graphics engine. Those new to 
SH lighting are introduced to various lighting techniques that utilize SHs 
for fast and robust real-time lighting. Advanced programmers that are 
already familiar with SH lighting gain valuable information for 
integrating SHs into their engines. The entire pipeline from artist 
interaction to runtime managing of SH light sources and SH lighting 



shaders will be covered using the Sushi engine as an example. 

Intended Audience: The intended audience for this session are graphics 
programmers who are looking to expand their graphics engine to 
incorporate SH based lighting techniques. 

Lecture - Advanced 

Advanced Real-Time Reflectance 

Daniel Baker, Naty Hoffman, Peter-Pike Sloan See pages 117-141 for bios 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-spm 

A3, Convention Center 

Recent advances in graphics hardware and APIs are enabling game 
developers to use increasingly general reflectance models in their 
games. However, physics and computer graphics research has generated 
a large body of knowledge about material reflectance which has not yet 
been leveraged by game developers. 

This talk starts with the basic physics of reflectance, and continues to 
explain the deficiencies of the most commonly-used model (Blinn- 
Phong).The presentation covers various reflectance models used in the 
computer graphics literature (such as Cook-Torrance, Ashikhmin-Shirley, 
Ward, La Fortune and others). 

Practical implementation methods for these reflectance models on 
modern programmable hardware are used to realistically render several 
real-world materials. The presentation concludes by discussing the 
integratation of these models into the game development pipeline. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave with a grounding in the principles behind 
reflectance models and efficient ways to use them. They will be able to 
implement, use, and modify advanced reflectance models in their 
games, and integrate these models into the toolchain and development 
pipeline. 

Intended Audience: This presentation is intended for graphics and 
engine programmers with an understanding of real-time graphics and 
basic calculus. 

Sponsored by ATI 

Advanced Shader Effects with ATI 

Thursday, March 25 • gam-5:i5pm 
A8, Convention Center 

Programmable graphics shaders are now a standard feature on a wide 
range of graphics hardware. The introduction of the DirectX 9 and 
OpenCL high level shading languages ensures that these high end 



-93- 



PROGRAMMING TRACK 



features are accessible to a mainstream 
audience - enabling the creation of 
compelling visual environments and special 
effects. 

Join ATI's 3D Application Research Group for a 
series of presentations that take an in depth 
look at the state-of-the-art in programmable 
shader effects. Topics that will be covered 
include: 

- Introduction to RenderMonkey, DirectX HLSL 
and OpenGL Shading Languages. 

- Depth of Field techniques 

- Hair Rendering 

-The GPU as a general purpose computation 
device 

- and other advanced rendering techniques 

The presentations also include a number of 
practical development and optimisation tips 
from the ATI demo and RenderMonkey teams. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave with a solid 
understanding of current shader techniques 
and development practices, along with 
practical ways that these can be introduced 
into games. 

Intended Audience: These presentations are 
aimed at game programmers looking to 
improve their knowledge of shader 
programming and to introduce some of the 
latest techniques into their titles. Some 
familiarity with shader programming is 
required for the advanced topics. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Al: Cameplay & Design: A Marriage of 

Heaven or Hell? 

Jonty Barnes & Peter Molyneux 

See pages n8 & 737 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24, • 5:30-6:3opm 
J2, Convention Center 

As Al becomes ever more complex, does this 
open the door for more or less gameplay? 
Lionhead's Jonty Barnes and Peter Molyneux 
demonstrates the benefits and drawbacks Al 
can have on gameplay anddesign, by looking 
at games from the past, present, and future. 

Technology advances are always exciting and 
it is tempting as a developer to incorporate 
cutting edge technology wherever and 
whenever possible but a designer must always 
remember that the gameplay experience 
must be the primary consideration in any 
game design. However, used well, sophis- 
ticated Al can open up innumerable gameplay 
and design possibilities. This session looks at 



what has now become possible in the field of 
Al and what impact and effect it has on the 
games of the future. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Al and Design: How Al Enables Designers 

Brian Reynolds See page 134 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-spm 

A3, Convention Center 

Whether you're a programmer who's always 
wanted to work on the game design or a 
designer who thinks there might be 
something to this "programming" thing, here's 
your chance to talk with someone who has 
worked both sides of the fence. We'll focus on 
Al and the ways in which Al development does 
(or should) overlap with the game design 
process, drawing case studies from the 
presenter's experiences as lead designer for 
Rise of Nations, Alpha Centauri, and 
Civilization II. We'll talk about why delaying 
Al development "until the design docs are 
final" is a wasted opportunity, and how both 
Al and Design benefit from simultaneous 
prototyping. We'll explore not only the 
traditional use of Al to determine goals and 
strategy for computer players, but also the 
critical role of Al in supplying "personality" to 
computer-controlled characters. Perhaps most 
importantly we'll talk about the sometimes- 
unexpected ways Al techniques can be 
invaluable in content generation. 

Takeaway: New ways to integrate game 
design with Al development, and how Al can 
be uniquely valuable in content generation. 

Intended Audience: Programmers, Designers, 
and especially Programmer-Designers! 
Knowledge of basic C++ programming 
techniques is helpful but not essential. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 

Al in Computer Games Roundtables and 

Interactive Discussion 

Eric Dybsand, Neil Kirby, Steven Woodcock 

See pages nj-i4ifor bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 

Santa Clara I, Santa Clara II, Plaza, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

Santa Clara I, Santa Clara II, Plaza, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • iO:30-ii:3oam 

Santa Clara I, Santa Clara II, Plaza, Hilton 

On the first day, we propose to host multiple, 
simultaneous Artificial Intelligence 
Roundtables (AI-RT) in adjacent rooms. Each 
AI-RT session provides the GDC 2004 attendee 
with the opportunity to discuss general Al 



related topics with other developers. The 
sessions remain small in size to promote 
discussion. All topics of interest in the field of 
computer game Al design, development and 
implementation will be available for 
discussion. This is the traditional general AI-RT 
that has been offered every year of the 
conference. 

On the second day, we propose our 
simultaneous AI-RT sessions are focused on 
the topics of "Al in RTS/Wargames" 
(moderated by Steve Woodcock), "Al in RPG 
and Adventure Games" (moderated by Neil 
Kirby) and "Al in First Person Games" 
(moderated by Eric Dybsand). Each of these 
unique AI-RTs focus on computer game Al 
issues that are specific to the genres above. 

On the third day, we propose in lieu of the AI- 
RT sessions, that we chair an "Al for Beginners 
- Interactive Panel Discussion" for the purpose 
of encouraging those who are new to Al in 
Computer games to ask questions and obtain 
answers and engage in discussion on Al 
related topics at a more comfortable level. This 
discussion encompasses any topic of 
computer game Al and is intended to provide 
information to those people in game 
development who are unfamiliar with Al in 
computer games. 

Takeaway: The general topic session appeals 
to the experienced Al developer. The Genre 
Specific session focuses on special Al needs, 
and a "Beginners" session, allows so-called 
"dumb" Al questions to be asked and 
answered in an unpressured environment. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Artificial Potential Fields for the Control 

of Navigation and Animation 

Bryan Stout See page 738 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 4-5pm 

A6, Convention Center 

In the field of robotics, one of the most well- 
established approaches to the problem of 
motion control, moving to the goal while 
avoiding obstacles, has been artificial 
potential fields. APFs are virtual forces 
imagined to emanate from game objects, the 
goals attracting, the obstacles repelling. The 
various forces on the agent are combined to 
automatically generate the desired motion. 
This approach has been used in a variety of 
robotic applications, from robot arms in 
manufacturing to mobile robot navigation, 
indoors and outdoors. It has been very popular 
for several reasons: it is easy to understand; it 
has a low computational burden; and it is very 



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flexible, adapting to stationary or moving obstacles, to single or multiple 
agents, to completely known or unknown or uncertain terrain, and to 
varying constraints on agent motion. Despite all this, APFs are virtually 
unknown in the game development community. 

This lecture summarizes the major ideas in the use of APFs over the past 
quarter century, and show how they can be applied to games. The major 
topics include the theory behind APFs; designing appropriate potential 
and/or force functions; algorithms for using APFs in both navigation and 
animation; avoiding or escaping from deadends and other local minima; 
enforcing stability in motion; conforming to dynamic constraints; vortex 
fields and other APF variations; application to avoiding collisions with 
moving obstacles; and application to multi-agent movement in flocks or 
formations. These principles are illustrated with software demos 
developed to accompany the presenter's book. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn about the theory of artificial potential fields, 
and their properties. They learn about many of the various ways they 
have been used, and the attributes of these implementations, so they 
can determine which methods would be best for their needs. They learn 
about possible problems with their use, and ways these problems can be 
avoided. 

Intended Audience: This presentation is for those responsible for 
programming the behavior for agent navigation, or those who are 
looking for ways to include obstacle avoidance in their animation 
system. Familiarity with vector calculus is helpful, though not required. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Beyond Finite State Machines: Managing Complex, Intermixing 

Behavior Hierarchies 

Michael Mateas & Andrew Stern See pages 130 & 138 for bios 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

A3, Convention Center 

Developers generally want more richness and reactivity in their Al 
agents. However, cleanly and elegantly managing the complexity of 
intermixing hierarchies of Al agent behaviors is very hard. The 
traditional finite state machine approach is simply not capable of this 
level of sophistication. This lecture describes the presenters' approach 
and attempts at solving this problem in Facade, an interactive story 
discussed last year at GDC. 

In doing so, the presenters discuss several specific issues, including 
techniques and data structures for representing and managing 
intermixing hierarchies of parallel and sequential behaviors. In their 
solution, this involves the use of preconditions, context-conditions and 
success-tests, versus traditional if-then conditionals. Another issue involves 
the use of priorities and conflicts, for both managing low-level body 
resources and the pursuit of multiple, overlapping high-level agent goals. 

Furthermore, the presenters describe some effective ways they found to 
use and organize behaviors (idioms). These include smaller idioms for 
achieving powerful agent functionality in relatively few lines of code, and 
broader idioms for structuring interactive conversation and narrative. 

Along the way the presenters touch upon some general lessons learned, 
such as the advantages and challenges of moving away from sequential, 
imperative programming (C++) towards parallel, behavioral 
programming, including the new difficulties of debugging that arise. 

Additional issues discussed include the use of joint behaviors as a 
method for avoiding ad hoc communication between asynchronous 



agents, and reflection, which allows meta-behaviors to monitor and 
modify the state of other behaviors, particularly as a technique for 
responding to the player's actions. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn design and implementation idioms for 
structuring complex, hierarchical, character behavior. This includes 
idioms for authoring tightly coordinated multi-character behavior, such 
as conversation behavior. Techniques include the use of meta-behaviors 
to monitor and modify the execution state of other behaviors, and the 
use of joint behaviors to manage multi-character coordination (avoiding 
ad hoc communication). Finally, advantages and challenges of moving 
away from imperative programming (C++) to behavioral programming 
are discussed. 

Intended Audience: This presentation is of interest to programmers, 
particularly Al programmers. It is accessible to a broad range of 
experience levels, from beginners on up. It is especially beneficial to 
those with experience in designing and programming interactive 
character behavior. 

Lecture - Advanced 
Building a Million Particle System 
Lutz Latta See page ugfor bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 
A3, Convention Center 

Particle systems have long been recognized as an essential building block 
for rich and lively visual environments. Current implementations can 
handle up to 10,000 particles in real-time situations and are mostly 
limited by transfers of particle data from the main processor to the 
graphics hardware (GPU) for rendering. A full GPU implementation 
however does not have this bottleneck and can simulate and render one 
million particles in real-time on recent hardware. This allows a dramatic 
increase in the level of detail and also much smaller particles. Thus it goes 
back again towards the original idea of a particle being a minimal 
geometry element. The massively parallel simulation of particle physics on 
a GPU can be a flexible combination of a multitude of motion and position 
operations, such as gravity, local forces, and collision with primitive 
geometry shapes or texture-based height fields. This high level of realism 
allows particle systems to be used as gameplay element, such as for fog- 
like local invisibility. Additionally this technique can be combined with a 
parallel sorting algorithm, performing a distance-based sorting of the 
particles for correct alpha-blended rendering. 

Takeaway: The attendee learns how to tackle an important visualization 
problem, specifically, how to move particle systems completely into 
graphics hardware, where they belong, and thereby save CPU time for 
other problems. The attendee is shown the concept of using graphics 
hardware for physical simulation, and how the resulting pixel data 
(textures) can immediately be used as input geometry on modern GPUs. 
Additionally the attendee is introduced to the implementation of a 
parallel sorting algorithm, and gets to know the benefits of high volume 
and physically complex particle systems for player immersion. 

Intended Audience: The presentation is mainly intended for 
programmers, especially those handling graphics or physics system 
programming. Familiarity with the basic concepts of graphics hardware 
programmability (shaders) is necessary and knowledge of the current PC 
GPU generation capabilities is a plus. Ideally the listener has already 
designed a particle system or has implemented similar physically-based 
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Roundtable - All 

By the Books: Solid Software Engineering 

for Games 

Noel Llopis See page ngfor bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • g-ioam 

Santa Clara I, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • g-ioam 

Santa Clara II, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 

Santa Clara II, Hilton 

Games are getting to be more and more 
complex projects, involving many people, long 
schedules, and large budgets. The traditional 
method of coding "on the fly" (also called "code- 
like-hell" and "hack-and-slash") doesn't scale 
well to projects of this size. In this session we 
discuss what software engineering techniques 
are currently being used across the game 
industry. We talk about what works, what 
doesn't, and what could be done differently. 

Each day the roundtable concentrates on 
different topics related to software 
engineering for games. 

On day one the roundtable focuses on what a 
company can do right away to improve their 
development process. We'll talk about what 
techniques have the biggest payoff for the 
least amount of risk. This is intended primarily 
for groups who want to improve their process 
through software engineering but want a few 
pointers to get started. We'll talk about how 
software engineering can improve the final 
product, and we'll share what worked and 
what didn't. 

On day two the roundtable focuses on 
methodologies and processes. We'll cover 
extreme programming, iterative 
programming, more classical approaches such 
as the waterfall model. We'll talk about how 
group size and project type can affect the 
process and discuss what works best for each 
case. We'll discuss the issues such as 
communication, design, architecture, or team 
organization. 

Finally, on day three, the roundtable concen- 
trates on languages and tools. It is true that 
no tools are necessary to apply good software 
engineering techniques, but they can often be 
a big help. We'll cover design tools (from old- 
fashioned whiteboards to UML tools), version 
control tools, testing tools, defect tracking 
tools, etc. 

Takeaway: This session aims to increase the 
awareness of software engineering in the 
games industry, discuss people's experiences, 



and give participants new ideas on how to 
improve their development. 

Intended Audience: Anyone interested in 
software engineering: both those who are 
successfully applying software engineering 
techniques, and those who want to improve 
their development process. 

Sponsored by NVIDIA 
Cinematic Effects II: The Revenge 
Kevin Bjcrke See page n8for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 
A8, Convention Center 

With the latest graphics hardware, there are 
more opportunities than ever to incorporate 
techniques from film into games. As the 
worlds of interactive computer games and 
offline-rendered films continue to converge, 
adopting such techniques allows game 
developers to improve their storytelling and 
enhance gameplay. In this session, attendees 
learn practical and efficient ways to add new 
cinematic effects to their games. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn how to incorporate 
techniques from film into their games to 
enhance storytelling and gameplay 

Sponsored by Metrowerks 

CodeWarrior Game Development 

Technology 

Roger Edgar See page 123 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 3~4pm 

Friday, March 26 • iO:30-ii:3oam 

Ci, Convention Center 

Metrowerks provides an overview of 
CodeWarrior game development technology. 
Additional topics include compiler 
enhancements, and how a developer can tune 
their application for the highest possible 
performance using our analysis tools. There 
will also be a special feature presentation 
regarding new technology soon to be 
available for upcoming platforms. 

Takeaway: Development technology and a 
view of our analysis tools. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The Collection and Applications of Metrics 

in an MMP Game: Lessons Learned from The 

Sims Online 

Larry Mellon See page 131 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 

A2, Convention Center 

Metrics are essential in the development and 
operation of massively multiplayer games. 



Valuable insights are available to 
programmers during debugging and 
scalability testing. Game designers get early 
and accurate feedback as to player activity and 
game tuning issues, while Operations can 
similarly track problem customers. 

Metrics are also a non-trivial sub-system. 
Without careful design, one is awash in a sea 
of data from hundreds to thousands of 
processes: unable to see patterns or digest 
results. Further, the volume and frequency of 
collected data has the potential to seriously 
disrupt the servers under study. 

Automated collection, aggregation and 
summarization of data were found to be 
critical in the implementation of metrics tools 
for The Sims On line. This talk summarizes the 
design of TSO's "embedded profiler" and 
lessons learned while fielding the system. 

Examples of practical, day to day applications 
of metrics during the development and 
operational stages of an MMP game are used 
to illustrate the value of fielding metrics 
gathering & analysis tools early in the 
development cycle. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn the importance of 
fielding metrics collection and analysis tools 
early in the development cycle. Takeaway 
messages include the various applications of 
metrics that make early fielding valuable, how 
to build a light-weight metrics collection 
system that does not significantly impact 
server load, and using such tools in the day to 
day operations of an MMP service. 

Intended Audience: This talk is aimed at the 
three major consumers of metrics in MMP 
games: developers, game designers, and 
customer service staff. 

No prerequisite knowledge of metrics 
collection and analysis is necessary; however 
attendees should have a moderate 
background in the development or operation 
of a massively multiplayer game. 

Sponsored by NVIDIA 
Coming to a Pixel Near You: Mobile 3D 
Graphics on the NVIDIA GoForce GPU 
NVIDIA Developer Technology Engineers 

Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 
C4, Convention Center 

In this session, NVIDIA will present an 
introduction to the latest GoForce GPU. The 
presentation will provide an overview of the 
chip's architecture, with a focus on its real- 
time 3D capabilities. In addition, attendees will 



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see demonstrations of the technology and learn how to get involved in 
NVIDIA's handheld developer program. Finally, the session will cover 
practical programming techniques that enable developers to effectively 
develop content for the latest CoForce GPU. 

Takeaway: Attendees will learn about the latest CoForce CPU, see 
demonstrations, and be taught how to take advantage of it effectively. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Common C++ Performance Mistakes in Games 

Pete Isensee See page ujfor bio 

Friday, March 26 • 2:303:30pm 

A3, Convention Center 

The Xbox Advanced Technology Group reviews dozens of Xbox games at 
the source code level, analyzing performance, pinpointing bottlenecks 
and recommending solutions. Naturally, the focus of these reviews is on 
graphics and Xbox hardware, but it's surprising how often C++ 
performance issues crop up in games. Even the most technically astute 
developers stumble when it comes to C++. This talk covers the most 
common issues seen by ATG, identifies treacherous language features, 
discusses the places to tread cautiously, and exposes some common 
misconceptions about a programming language that game developers 
use and misuse with abandon. 

Takeaway: Most game developers use C++ on a daily basis, but a 
surprising number don't give much thought to how basic language 
features and library components can affect the performance of their 
game. Even the best developers in the world are tripped up by C++ now 
and then. Attendees come away from this talk with concrete examples 
of how C++ misconceptions and misuse directly affect game 
performance. Programmers learn how to avoid these kinds of 
performance issues in their own games. 

Intended Audience: This presentation is designed for C++ programmers 
writing games for any platform. Although the talk is based on 
experience with Xbox and Visual C++, the key points apply to any game 
platform using any modern C++ compiler. The lecture covers a few 
esoteric corners of the language, but the focus is on common mistakes 
in the core language features. 

Sponsored by Nokia 

Creating Local Interactive Games for N-Gage 

Jari Saarhelo & Paul Whitaker See pages 135 & 140 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 

Ci, Convention Center 

Learn how to develop multiplayer games over Bluetooth for the N-Gage 
Mobile Game Deck, based on the Series 60 Platform from Nokia. 
Presentation includes an overview of the Bluetooth technology, N-Gage 
Bluetooth support as well as the Bluetooth gaming tools and libraries 
available from Nokia. We'll also cover the upcoming Bluetooth features 
in N-Gage. Members of the N-Gage technical team will be on hand to 
answer questions during and after the session. 

Takeaway: Developers understand how to build multiplayer games 
using Bluetooth technology 

Intended Audience: Developers interested in mobile game development. 



Lecture - Advanced 

Deferred Shading on DX9 Class Hardware and the Xbox 

Rich Geldreich & Matt Pritchard See pages 124 & 734 for bios 

Friday, March 26 • 4-5pm 

A3, Convention Center 

Deferred Shading is a rendering technique where all lighting/shading 
computations are delayed until after the scene is rendered. This 
technique is used in the non-realtime and raytracing world but only 
recently has become practical for realtime gaming on the PC and 
console. For the game developer this means a complete decoupling of 
geometry rendering from lighting, and removing the problem of 
determining which geometry interacts with which lights. This also 
eliminates traditional hardware limitations on the number and types of 
lights used. A deferred shading engine is capable of taking advantage of 
the latest hardware and delivering all the cutting edge shading effects 
you want: 100% per-pixel lighting, extensive material property functions 
(NDFs, BRDFs),true High Dynamic Range lighting, Volumetric and true 
3D shaped lights. The presenters, who have developed and shipped titles 
using deferred shading, takes the attendees from the high level 
concepts to the nuts and bolts of developing a deferred shading 
renderer. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave this session with a detailed understanding of: 

- What deferred shading is, and how it differs from tradition rendering in 
games and consoles 

-The advantages and limitations of deferred shading 

- How to implement a deferred shading renderer on both the PC and 
console environments 

- How advanced lighting and material features work within a deferred 
shading renderer 

- How rendering features such as shadows, anti-aliasing, and other 
effects work within a deferred shading renderer. 

Intended Audience: This lecture is designed for the graphics 
programmer who is already familiar with traditional 3D rendering and 
lighting techniques. Knowledge of DirectX (preferred) or OpenGL is 
necessary. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Destruction on a Diet 

John Crocker & Bruce Woodard 

See pages 121 & 740 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 
A6, Convention Center 

Environmental interactivity is at the core of some of today's most 
popular games. The days of sterile worlds deprived of any dynamic 
elements, save the primary players, have passed; gamers have come to 
expect a living, evolving, reactive landscape. A few simple behaviors and 
a flexible means of placing them in the hands of artists can go a long 
way toward creating a fun and immersive player experience while using 
only minimal run-time resources. 

This presentation follows the evolution of techniques for environmental 
interactivity successfully used in Twisted Metal: Black, War of the 
Monsters, and Downhill Domination. The lecture covers efficient 
methods for destruction and secondary Al, with a description of the 
entire process from asset creation, through the tool chain, and into the 
implantation of the run-time behaviors. Also discussed are the 






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implications of a changing topology with 
dynamic elements on Al and network play. 

Intended Audience: This lecture is primarily 
aimed at intermediate level tool and 
behavioral programmers, but beginner and 
advanced programmers may also take away 
useful ideas. Some familiarity with physical 
simulation, Al, and Maya may be helpful. 

Sponsored by Intel 

Developing Games for Cool New Desktop 

Technologies 

Thomas Loza See page xxfor bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 

Ai, Convention Center 

This class presents the upcoming platform 
advances that Intel will be introducing in 
2004. Developers will learn about High 
Definition Audio, PCI Express and PCI Express 
Graphics, Serial ATA Native Command Queuing 
and plenty more. Come prepared to wet your 
appetite on what will be possible for new 
games that take advantage of the latest 
technologies. 

Takeaway: With millions of PCs being shipped 
with new technologies, developers will gain 
the necessary information to take advantage 
of all the platform features. 

Intended Audience: Intermediate. Game 
development knowledge as it applies to new 
technologies. 

Sponsored by Nokia 
Developing Games for N-Gage 
Kirsi Kotilainen & Jussi Wacklin 

See pages 128 & 739 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 • 2:303:30pm 
C1, Convention Center 

Learn how to develop games for the N-Gage 
platform. Presentation includes an overview of 
the platform, detailed technical specifications, 
and tools introduction. We'll also tell you more 
about becoming an N-Gage developer and 
taking your games to market with Nokia. 
Members of the N-Gage technical team will 
be on hand to answer questions during and 
after the session. 

Takeaway: Developers understand how to get 
started in building games for the N-Gage 
Mobile Game Deck. 

Intended Audience: Developers interested in 
building games for the N-Gage Mobile Game 
Deck. 



Sponsored by Nokia 

Developing Native C++ Games for Mobile 

Devices 

Nokia Series 60 Technical Team 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-spm 
C1, Convention Center 

With a native C++ programming environment, 
Nokia's Series 60 platform presents a rich 
programming environment for developers. With 
10 million Series 60 devices on the market by 
the end of 2003 and five licensees representing 
roughly 60 percent of the mobile market, Series 
60 also presents an excellent business 
opportunity. This presentation covers detailed 
technical specifications, platform overview, 
development tools, game design guidelines, as 
well as information on working with Nokia to 
market and sell your titles. Members of the 
Series 60 technical team will be on hand to 
answer questions after the presentation. 

Intended Audience: C++ game developers 
interested in building mobile games. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Developing Wireless Location-Based Games 

Jay Aguilar See page 117 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 

Ji, Convention Center 

With the advent of more powerful cell phones, 
new cell phones now have GPS functionality 
or a form of location technologies that take 
wireless gaming to a new level. 

Unlike normal games, location will be the 
focal point going beyond the fixed world of 
normal gaming. 

These new location-based games utilize the 
technology in the handsets to create new, 
dynamic gaming opportunities with the use 
of their mobile phone and location. The use of 
the location of the mobile phone change the 
dynamics of gaming. 

Developers understand how to code using the 
phone's location, the development tools need, 
and the middleware tools that are needed for 
the new wave of wireless location-based 
gaming. 

Takeaway: The audience is able to identify the 
technologies used to create location-based 
games and understand what vendors to 
choose for their game/application. Also, 
members benefit by understanding the new 
trends of wireless development using both 
Java and C++ in the handsets. 

Intended Audience: The audience members 
are programmers/developers/product 



mangers that are interested in developing 
wireless location-based games. A general 
knowledge of Java & C++ and mobile/game 
architectures is helpful. 

Sponsored by NVIDIA 
Effective Handheld Development 
NVIDIA and Various Guest Speakers 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-ii:3oam 
C4, Convention Center 

In this session, handheld middleware 
developers are discussing a variety of topics 
related to developing interactive 3D content 
on the latest NVIDIA GoForce GPU. The session 
covers strategies for creating handheld games, 
as well as how to publish and distribute 
games in the mobile space. In addition, the 
speakers discusses the technologies they offer 
and share their own experience, tips, and 
tricks for developing handheld content. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn how to tackle 
content development for handheld devices. 

Roundtable - All 

Embodied Autonomous Agents 

Bryan Stout See page 138 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 

Santa Clara II, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:15-5:^171 

Santa Clara II, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 

Santa Clara II, Hilton 

Autonomous agents are entities that perceive 
their world and act within it. Embodied AAs 
have their world equal to the real world, in 
which they move, sense and are sensed, act 
and are acted upon. In our virtual game 
worlds, they are the entities we see on the 
screen, acting within the small worlds 
visualized in the display, as opposed to agents 
that operate on other levels, such as making 
strategic decisions or giving advice to players. 

The demands on embodied AAs are high: they 
are now expected to act only on information 
they should reasonably perceive; their action 
animations have ever-growing standards of 
realism; they may even be expected to show 
different attributes and personalities from 
each other. This roundtable provides the 
opportunity to discuss the issues developers 
face when implementing embodied AAs, and 
share perspectives and possible solutions. 

Each day of the roundtable focuses on a 
different stage of the "perceive-think-act" 
cycle. The first day focuses on sensing and 
perception, and issues such as data 



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transmission (line-of-sight checks alone can take up more than the rest 
of the Al combined), data content (what exactly is sensed), queries vs. 
interrupts, and focus of attention. The second day focuses on decision- 
making, and issues such as agent memory, individual world represen- 
tations, beliefs, goals, personality, etc. as well as reasoning techniques. 
The final day covers action, and issues such as action representation, 
control over the animation, realistic action, physics, collision detection, 
etc. The specific issues discussed each day depends on the desires and 
contributions of the participants. 

Takeaway: The attendees come away with a better appreciation for the 
issues involved with embodied AAs: the problems developers have to 
deal with in their implementation as well as the solutions and ideas to 
try that they share with each other. 

Intended Audience: Programmers, animators, designers, or any other 
developers who wrestle with the issues involved with implementing 
embodied AAs. 

Sponsored by Intel 

Enhancing Software Performance with Intel® Compiler 

An Le See page ugfor bio 

Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 

Ai, Convention Center 

We will demonstrate the benefit of using the Intel Compiler to speedup 
the rendering of 3D graphics. This session is focused on the major 
optimization features of the Intel Compiler. Learn how to use the Intel 
compiler to optimize software for the latest Intel processors. 

Takeaway: After completing this tutorial, you should be able to use the 
Intel compilers to compile your application and optimize your code to 
take advantage of the latest Intel processors. 

Intended Audience: Software developers who are interested in 
improving runtime performance on the latest Intel Processors. 

Lecture - Advanced 

Fast Yet Realistic Deformation and Fracture 

James O'Brien See page 132 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 

A6, Convention Center 

This talk discusses the details of a simple to implement finite element 
method for modeling deformable solids. Although the mathematical 
underpinnings of continuum mechanics cannot be ignored, the main 
concern of the talk focuses on how one goes about implementing and 
using the techniques to generate interesting behaviors. In addition to 
basic elastic deformation, more advance techniques for plastic 
deformation and fracture are also covered. 

Takeaway: An understanding of a simple finite element method that can 
be used to model things that bend, jiggle, twist, break, shatter, and tear. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The Full Spectrum Warrior Camera System 

John Giors See page 124 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 

J2, Convention Center 

This lecture focuses on the details of the camera system technology 
used in the game Full Spectrum Warrior (FSW).The lecture covers the 



camera motion system, which is based on a modified version of the 
proportional controller often used in game camera systems. The lecture 
also covers the unique "autolook" feature that gives players a better 
view of the battlefield in situations where the view would normally be 
largely obstructed. Collision avoidance and high-level architecture 
considerations are also discussed, as well as techniques for providing 
feedback to programmers and designers, who need to "tune" the system 
for optimal performance. The lecture concludes with a discussion of the 
limitations of the FSW camera system, a summary of recommended 
practices, and ideas for future investigation. 

Takeaway: How to create fluid camera motions in real time using a 
modified proportional controller (MPC). How the unique FSW "autolook" 
feature works. Collision avoidance techniques. The importance of visual 
feedback for camera "tuning" and debugging. General recommendations 
for camera system design and programming. 

Intended Audience: This lecture is intended for anyone that is interested 
in 3D camera system programming. The presentation is primarily aimed 
at an intermediate level audience, but beginners and advanced 
programmers also be able to takeaway useful ideas from the lecture. 

Though familiarity with game camera system programming is helpful 
for understanding, it is not required. Programming experience and an 
understanding of 3D vector math are assumed prerequisites. 

Sponsored by Intel 
The Future of Handheld Caminc 
Rob McNair See page 130 for bio 
Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 
Ai, Convention Center 

Intel shows new technology for connected PDAs and cell phones that 
will meet the multimedia and 3D gaming requirements of these devices. 
The solutions incorporate a combination of software and hardware 
acceleration capabilities that will run advanced 3D games, DVD quality 
videos, and high-end audio, with advanced power management 
technology to provide the extended usage that is expected by the next 
generation user. Intel is enabling the infrastructure to allow reuse of 
game assets and to shorten time to market that will increase the ROI for 
titles on these platforms. Intel is providing standard graphic APIs 
optimized for the hardware capabilities integrated with leading game 
development suites. 

Takeaway: Developers can rapidly take titles originally developed for the 
PC or console and quickly move them to PDAs or cell phones based on 
Intel technology. 

Intended Audience: Beginners 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Game Mobility Requires Code Portability 
Guido Henkel See page 125 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 
Bi, Convention Center 

Developing games for the mobile market, such as phones and PDAs, is 
challenging in many ways. With literally every phone handset and PDA 
having its own technical specs, and featuring a variety of operating 
systems, one of the biggest challenges for successful developers in this 
field is to overcome these differences and create code that is easily 
portable into all environments without sacrificing performance. 



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Using concrete code examples this course 
explains techniques used by professional 
developers in the mobile space that ensure a 
high level of code portability, and code safety 
while allowing to make full use of each 
target's idiosyncrasies and features. It 
illustrates in concise examples how to build 
code and frameworks that can be ported to 
virtually any platform easily and efficiently. It 
explains how to work with and around 
hardware dependencies, without losing 
performance, and it kickstarts thinking in 
terms that are removed from operating 
systems and implementation languages. 

Takeaway: Attendees takeaway proven 
techniques that have been put to use in 
various published mobile games. These 
techniques are illustrated using actual code 
samples. It also instills ideas how to find and 
avoid pitfalls that may prevent their code from 
being portable to other platforms. 

Intended Audience: Audience members with 
experience in the mobile field on various 
platforms benefits the most from the 
techniques shown, as they are able to 
immediately put them to work in their own 
projects. But also programmers who are just 
getting started in the field or are just 
generally curious about cross-platform 
development benefit from the techniques 
presented here. 

Sponsored by NVIDIA 

CPU Gems Showcase 

Kevin Bjorke, Cem Cebenoyan, Matt Pharr 

See Pages 117-141 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:30^171 
A8, Convention Center 

This talk covers selected chapters from CPU 
Gems: Programming Techniques, Tips, and Tricks 
for Real-Time Graphics. The authors of the 
chapters will share their insight and present 
several relatively quick and easy techniques 
that can be adopted by game engines to 
increase realism. In the first segment covers 
ambient occlusion, a simple technique that 
mimics the effects of basic global illumi- 
nation. In the next segment, we will describe 
some improvements to perspective shadow 
maps that make them more usable in practice. 
The last segment covers image-based lighting, 
which (among other things) can be used to 
make environment maps appear to be local. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn about several 
relatively simple but useful effects from GPU 
Gems: Programming Techniques, Tips, and Tricks 
for Real-Time Graphics that they can 



incorporate and extend in their own projects. 

Sponsored by Intel 

Grow Your Market with Intel® Graphics 

Chuck DeSylva & Kipp Owens 

Thursday, March 25 • i2-ipm 
Ai, Convention Center 

This course will give you an introduction to 
creating code that plays well on Intel Graphics, 
the volume leading desktop and mobile 
graphics architecture in the industry* In 2004, 
Intel will be introducing their 3rd generation 
graphics core with hardware acceleration for 
Microsoft DirectXg. Intel Graphics will be on a 
growing number of client PCs - come learn 
how to take advantage of this unique 
architecture and provide compelling gameplay 
on the market-leading graphics solution. 
'Mercury Research "PC Graphics 2003 Updated 
Edition 4O2003" 

Takeaway: Good gameplay can be achieved on 
Intel Graphics by following a few key 
guidelines and taking advantage of Intel tools. 

Intended Audience: Basic 3D programming 
knowledge. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
High Dynamic Range Lighting 
Paul Debevec See page 122 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 
Ji, Convention Center 

This session shows how to create more 
realistic environments and lighting through 
high dynamic imagery and image-based 
lighting. The course presents how high 
dynamic range imagery (HDRI) covering the 
full range of light in the real world can as 
texture maps in real-time virtual 
environments and as realistic sources of 
illumination for CG objects and characters. The 
course explains the relationship between 
HDRI, Image-Based Lighting, and Global 
Illumination, and how the three can be used 
together to create renderings and composites 
with extremely high realism. Examples are 
given using renderings from LightWave 3D, 
Maya, RADIANCE, and the Arnold rendering 
system. HDRI file formats, manipulation 
software, special blur and glare effects, and 
issues surrounding gamma correction are 
presented. The session demonstrates new 
real-time realistic rendering techniques 
leveraging the programmability and HDR 
capabilities of the latest graphics cards. 

Takeaway: Light in the real world has an 
enormous dynamic range, which can make 



achieving realism with standard imaging and 
rendering techniques difficult. New image 
processing and hardware programming 
techniques overcome the dynamic range 
problems for real-time rendering which can be 
combined with global illumination techniques 
to produce vividly photoreal graphics. 

Intended Audience: This session helps artists, 
game designers, programmers, and especially 
people involved in lighting environments and 
characters. Participants should have 
experience with digital image processing 
(Adobe Photoshop), CG lighting (point light 
sources, surface normals, etc.), and would 
benefit from some knowledge of GPU 
programming. 

Sponsored by Trymedia 
Inside the Hacker Mind 
Andres Torrubia See page 138 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 
C4, Convention Center 

A content protection expert exposes the 
'hacker mindset' and provide specific tips on 
what to watch out for, how to save time, how 
to avoid costly security integration and other 
pitfalls. Popular techniques, tools and 
methods hackers use to attack an application 
and break its security will be demonstrated to 
illustrate how game protection can either 
protect your game. ..or fail it almost instantly. 

Takeaway: Find out where games are most 
vulnerable and how to minimize the risks of 
piracy. 

Intended Audience: Producers and 
programmers who oversee game protection 
strategy and develop in-game security for PC 
games. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Integrating Physics into a Modern Game 

Engine 

Brandon Moro See page 131 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

A6, Convention Center 

Physics is quickly becoming a basic building 
block of games in many genres. Originally 
players only expected accurate physics 
simulation in their racing games, but today it's 
a key selling point for first-person shooters, 
third-person adventures, even sports and 
puzzles. Whether you use middleware or roll 
your own, certain key decisions must be made, 
and certain common problems solved. In 
Starcraft: Ghost, we used a popular 



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middleware package as the basis for the physics, but the real challenge 
was in integrating the system into the project both technically and 
creatively. Specific issues this case study addresses include: how to 
simulated mixed systems of physical and non-physical objects, how to 
integrate physics properties and constraints in the game's art pipeline, 
how to setup efficient breakable objects, and how to optimize 
performance across multiple platforms. The talk also covers the specifics 
of successful use of ragdoll systems, collision handlers, and how to avoid 
common pitfalls. 

Takeaway: Through concrete examples and in-game demos, attendees 
learn more about how to integrate a physics system into a real game, as 
opposed to just a nifty demo. Attendees also leave with a better 
understanding of what is possible using physics in their own game 
engines. 

Intended Audience: This talk is intended for game programmers with a 
basic understanding of physics. 

Sponsored by Quazal 

Introducing Rendezvous: A Powerful and Flexible Solution for 

Developing an Online Lobby Service 

Mike Drummelsmith See page 123 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

A1, Convention Center 

Rendez-Vous represents Quazal's completion of the online gaming 
equation. In 2000, Quazal introduced a revolutionary way of doing in- 
game networking with its Duplicated Object technology. Now, Quazal 
introduces a cutting-edge lobby and matchmaking system, designed 
from the ground up to handle the needs of developers in 2004 and 
beyond. The Rendez-Vous technology is comprised of a number of 
interconnected services, covering all aspects of a modern lobby solution, 
from basic features such as authentication and account management, 
to advanced features including tournaments, downloadable/ uploadable 
content, and voice chat. This presentation introduces the Rendez-Vous 
product and its design to attendees, outlining the different services, how 
each works, and how they interconnect together to allow rapid 
development of a robust online gaming service. 

Takeaway: Attendees who hear this presentation should leave 
understanding the basic capabilities of the Rendez-Vous and Net-Z 
systems, with focus on Rendez-Vous as a strong and viable alternative to 
other online game service middleware. They should realize that with 
superior technology and cross-platform/cross-title capabilities, Rendez- 
vous is bound to become a serious new challenger in the online game 
lobby marketplace. 

Intended Audience: This is an intermediate level presentation, intended 
for network programmers and producers from teams planning online 
games in late 2004 and 2005. They should be somewhat familiar with 
the state of the industry and of competing solutions. 

Lecture - Advanced 

Lemke's Algorithm, The Hammer In Your Math Toolbox? 

Chris Hecker See page 13 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 

Ji, Convention Center 

The old saying, "if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail", 
is meant to be critical of the one-size-fits-all mentality to problem 
solving. However, in advanced game math you can transform a lot of 



problems into nails, and drive them home with Lemke's Algorithm for 
solving Mixed Linear Complementarity Problems (MLCP). And, as 
computers continue to get faster and programmers continue to not get 
faster, having a single hammer instead of a lot of special purpose tools 
is looking better every day.This lecture talks about the kinds of problems 
that can be transformed into MLCPs and why MLCPs are a sweet spot for 
solving interesting problems on computers, detail how to perform those 
transformations, and how to implement a Lemke solver. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave with knowledge of Lemke's Algorithm, its 
implementation, and its myriad uses throughout advanced game 
mathematics. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Light Scattering: Oh, that Looks Cool! Can we Have it in the Game, 

Real Quick? 

Thomas Engel See page 123 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-n:3oam 

A6, Convention Center 

Lately a lot of exciting new and old techniques to enhance lighting used 
in games have become technically feasible on current generation 
graphics hardware. Surprisingly, or perhaps not so surprisingly - a large 
number of these techniques have so far not made it into real game 
applications in any larger way shape or form, sometimes not at all. 

This talk illustrates the problems encountered and solutions found 
when trying to go from technology demonstration to real game 
application using Factor 5's latest game 'Star Wars: Rebel Strike' and the 
light scattering technique used in it as an example. Related technology 
used in the game are covered. A QA session ends this presentation. 

Takeaway: A better insight in the practical caveats of going from 
technical demonstration to real game application as well as some ideas 
to do light scattering even without DX8 or DX9. 

Intended Audience: Besides a quick introduction this talk does not try to 
teach the basics of simulating light scattering since good papers about 
the math are freely available. Hence it might be advisable to have some 
basic understanding of the technique before hand. But even people with 
no experience in the technique might take away a couple of interesting 
thoughts about the basic problems encountered when trying to go from 
technical demonstration to real game application. 

Roundtable - All 

Lua in the Gaming Industry 

Jonathan Burns & David Eichorn See pages 120 & 123 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 

Santa Clara I, Hilton 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 

Plaza, Hilton 

The embedded programming language Lua is becoming more and more 
widely used in the gaming industry. The beauty of this language is in its 
simplicity and flexibility; several games within Microsoft Game Studios 
employ the use of Lua for many aspects of their architectures, including 
scripting, game balancing, Al decision making, driving animations, Ul 
layout, and level building. The purpose of this roundtable discussion is to 
bring developers from the industry together to share in their experiences 
integrating Lua into their game projects. The goal is to spread awareness 
of the most popular uses of Lua and to also make any short-comings or 



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pitfalls apparent to those developers evaluating 
the use of Lua in their games. 

Takeaway: The audience are able to leave with 
a better understanding of Lua's place in the 
gaming industry. The many faceted uses of 
Lua in games are explored as attendees share 
in their experiences on their own projects. 
Pitfalls and shortcomings involved with Lua 
integration in games are also be explored, 
delving into issues such as performance using 
Lua and the Lua community. The attendees 
should have a greater awareness of how Lua 
can help their projects by the end of the 
roundtable discussion. In addition, it is hoped 
that the audience leaves with good contacts 
elsewhere in the industry for further 
discussion of Lua integration into their games. 

Intended Audience: Game developers and 
OA/Test are the targeted audience of this 
roundtable discussion. As the goal of this 
roundtable discussion is to spread awareness 
of Lua to the gaming community, no prereq- 
uisite knowledge/expertise of Lua is required, 
although it is hoped that some experienced 
individuals attend to help drive discussion! 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The Making of the Official Counter-Strike Bot 

Michael Booth See page ngfor bio 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-ii:3oam 

J2, Convention Center 

This lecture addresses the technical and 
design issues critical to the success of the 
official Counter-Strike bot, the most 
advanced FPS tactical multiplayer Al to date. 

The official Counter-Strike bot has received 
an enthusiastic reception from both newbies 
and veterans of the Counter-Strike 
community, largely due to the fact that it 
plays the game in a very believable, human- 
like fashion. The bots put on a "performance" 
that results in players feeling they are fighting 
against (and with) "worthwhile" opponents. 

Achieving this level of suspension of disbelief 
requires more than technical Al coding ability. 
It requires a thorough understanding of the 
game, insight into human limitations such as 
reaction times and attention prioritization, 
and a holistic sense of how to create a fun and 
believable "performance" from these disparate 
parts. 

Takeaway: The importance of simulating 
human limitations and techniques for doing 
so, approaches to waypoint-less navigation, 
mechanisms for automated map learning, and 
methods of robustly building decisions 



systems with finite state machines. 

Intended Audience: Basic familiarity with Al 
algorithms and terminology is recommended, 
but not required. Familiarity with Counter- 
Strike game mechanics would also be useful. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 
Massively-Multi player Engineering 
Jeff Johnson See page i2jfor bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 
Santa Clara I, Hilton 
Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 
Plaza, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 
Santa Clara I, Hilton 

The technical design of a massively- 
multiplayer game is significantly different 
than that of a single-player or traditional 
multiplayer game. A single-player game 
retains much greater control over the use of 
art assets and loaded resources. A typical 
multiplayer game does not have to deal with 
complex server/server or client/server 
interactions, and often relies on low latencies 
or a limited user population. These problems 
escalate in an MMP setting, and the solutions 
found can often impose drastic restrictions on 
both engineers and designers. This roundtable 
discusses how these problems resolve 
themselves in the "meat" of an MMP game 
engine, the code sitting between client/server 
networking and the graphical front-end. This 
layer is still an important consideration for 
developers using relevant middleware 
products. The leader opens with lessons 
learned in these areas during the course of 
developing three MMP games. World model 
design and the allocation of client versus 
server responsibilities are the primary focus of 
discussion. Participants are encouraged to 
bring their own wisdom and problems from 
their own development experiences. 

Takeaway: This roundtable enables partic- 
ipants to discuss the general issues of 
massively-multiplayer engineering, and how it 
differs from single-player game programming. 

Discusses the benefits and problems of 3D 
zone-based (e.g., Everouest), 3D seamless- 
world (e.g., Asheron's Call) and tile-based 
(e.g., Ultima Online) MMP world models, and 
how these impact client/server interactions. 

Allows for understanding on how world model 
design decisions impact gameplay options. 

Intended Audience: All game programmers are 
encouraged to attend, but programmers for 



MMP games or prospective MMPs are 
especially encouraged. Participants should 
have a basic familiarity with game 
programming and should be aware of the 
possible difficulties that MMP technical 
design presents. 

Sponsored by Microsoft 
Microsoft DirectX High-Level Shader 
Language Workshop 
Dan Baker & Kevin Gee 

See pages ny & 124 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • ioam-i2pm & 2-5pm 

Thursday, March 25 • ioam-i2pm & 2-5pm 

Friday, March 26 • ioam-i2pm 

C2, Convention Center 

To attend, you MUST pre-register at: 

- Microsoft DirectX Developer Day 
(March 23, ioam-6pm., Rooms A3/A4) 

- Microsoft Booth 

(March 24-25, ii:3oam-6:3opm., Booth #818) 

Learn DirectX High-Level Shader Language 
(HLSL) "hands on" from its creators, the DirectX 
graphics development team, by attending one 
of five FREE workshops held March 24-26 in 
Room C2 at the San Jose Convention Center. 

Takeaway: Until recently, only assembler-class 
tools have been available for authoring 
shaders, making debugging, maintenance and 
re-use of shader code a technical challenge. 
Now with DirectX 9.0 we have applied our 
core competencies in creating great developer 
tools to create a language that has all the 
familiarity of 'C'yet is tuned to run best on all 
programmable graphics hardware: Microsoft's 
DirectX High Level Shader Lanaguage (HLSL). 

Intended Audience: The HLSL Workshop 
Introductory Session is intended for 
experienced graphics programmers who want 
to know how to writeand use programmable 
vertex and pixel shaders using the massively 
flexible HLSL. Your instructors will be assuming 
knowledge of fundamental 3-D graphics 
techniques, including good matrix math. 

The Advanced session is for experienced 
coders who are already conversant with 
writing shaders and want to take their 
knowledge to a higher level. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Motion Capture-driven Simulation for 

Characters 

Victor Zordan See page 141 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 

A2, Convention Center 



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Simulation game engines (e.g. Havoc and Karma) are becoming 
increasingly popular, but the question of controlling characters in their 
frameworks is still mostly unanswered. Subtlies in the motion of 
animated, humanlike characters affect the believability, aesthetic and 
impact of animated agents in video games. While motion capture 
produces characters with stylistic detail in their movements, the data is 
difficult to edit and control, especially in a changing environment like 
those seen in the rich virtual worlds of current games. Dynamic 
simulation allows physical laws to dictate interactions under such 
circumstances, but controllers for simulated agents are difficult to 
construct because we do not know how to specify the details of human 
motion procedurally. In this lecture, we describe a technique for dynamic 
simulation driven by motion capture data as a means of controlling 
dynamic characters beyond the simple motion blending techniqes used 
thus far. Through combining simulation and motion capture, we work to 
retain the interactivity, reactivity, and non-precscribed effects of 
dynamics with the styliezed details of motion capture data. 

Takeaway: This lecture outlines a framework for taking advantage of the 
exciting potential allowed by full-body character dynamics alforded by 
recent advances in simulation technology (Havoc, Karma, etc.) Beyond 
ragdoll effects and simple blending, controllers and useful hi-c\s are 
introduced to maintaining precise control over simulated characters 
driven by motion capture. 

Intended Audience: This lecture provides an introduction and details 
regarding ourexploration with driving simulation with data recorded 
from human subjects. Participants should have a working knowledge of 
basic motion capture and blending as well as dynamics and be eager to 
learn about control for physics based characters. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Motion Synthesis 
Okan Arikan See page 117 for bio 
Friday. March 26 • g-ioam 
A6, Convention Center 

Realistic character animation is a crucial component of a successful 
game. Because the players interact with the synthetic characters, their 
motions must react to a variety of situations. Capturing or key-framing 
all possible motions that a game character may need to perform is 
impractical. The presenter shows two motion synthesis algorithms that 
can generate motions on the fly for a variety of user or game engine 
constraints by re-arranging frames from a collection of previously 
captured or animated motions. 

The first algorithm can synthesize motions that satisfy position and 
orientation constraints. For example, it can generate motions that visit 
user specified waypoints at specified times. One obtains the desired 
frames using a fast hierarchical graph search method. 

Motion demands can be more complex than just waypoint constraints. 
For example, one might need a motion that starts as a regular walk, 
then transitions to a surprised run, ending after five seconds at a 
particular spot. The presenter then demonstrates another system that 
can synthesize motions that meet such complex motion demands. The 
system uses an efficient hierarchical dynamic programming algorithm 
to search a database of motions for a sequence of frames that meets 
the demands while looking continuous. These methods can generate 
natural looking, life-like motions interactively. 

Takeaway: Motion synthesis is an important problem for creating 



realistic and interactive game characters. Data driven synthesis methods 
can generate very realistic motions that can be controlled very 
efficiently. Motions that follow user specified waypoints, or perform user 
specified actions, or interact with other motions while looking human, 
can be generated interactively. 

Intended Audience: This presentation assumes the audience is 
comfortable with traditional animation methods such as motion 
capture or key framing. A novice understanding of mathematical 
optimization or physical simulation is useful but not required. 

Roundtable - Advanced 

MULTIPLAYER TRICKS OF THE TRADE 

Dave Weinstein See page 140 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 
Santa Clara I, Hilton 

(Techniques that individual games and genres of games have used to 
cope with limited bandwidth) 
Thursday, March 25 • 4:15-5:^171 
Santa Clara I, Hilton 

(Techniques that individual games and genres of games have used to 
cope with real-world latency) 
Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 
Santa Clara I, Hilton 

(Issues and solutions that developers have found in developing multi- 
player games on proprietary platforms including Mobile Phones, Arcade 
machines and Consoles) 

Penn and Teller once said "We are professional liars." So are network 
game developers. The facts of Internet life make it necessary to resort to 
sleight of hand, misdirection, and other tricks of the trade to provide the 
game play the customers expect. This roundtable is a detailed study of 
three issues in multiplayer development, Bandwidth, Latency, and 
Development on Proprietary Platforms, each done as an entire session. 

Sponsored by NVIDIA 

Next-Gen Special Effects Showcase 

Cem Cebenoyan & Matthias Wloka See pages 120 & 140 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 

A8, Convention Center 

In this talk, NVIDIA Developer Technology engineers presents practical 
special effects developed for the latest graphics hardware. Each effect 
will be described in detail and demonstrated, in addition to being 
discussed in the context of integration with game engines. Finally, 
performance characteristics and optimization techniques will be covered 
for each effect. 

Takeaway: Attendees see a variety of stunning, new effects and 
techniques that they can integrate efficiently into their projects. 

Sponsored by Intel 

Optimizing Pixomatic for Modern Processors 

Michael Abrash See page 117 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 

A8, Convention Center 

It started with a goal so challenging it wasn't clear whether it was 
actually achievable-, to write a software rasterizer that was a suitable 
replacement, in both feature set and performance, for a DXy-class 






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graphics card. After a year of intensive 
research and experimentation on modern 
CPUs and memory subsystems, that goal was 
achieved; the result is Pixomatic, which may or 
may not the world's fastest full-featured 
software rasterizer (we think it is, but you 
never know what might be out there), but is, at 
the least, inarguably the fastest one Michael 
Abrash and fellow programmer Mike Sartain 
know how to write. 

In this lecture, Michael will discuss in detail 
the techniques he and Mike used to wring 
every drop of performance from today's CPUs 
for Pixomatic. The lecture will cover a wide 
range of rarely covered, practical optimization 
issues both old and new, including split 
load/stores, 64k aliasing, jump prediction, 
pointer chasing and memory latency, stack 
alignment, crossing cache lines, latencies 
between SSE, MMX, and general purpose 
registers, on-the-fly code generation, using the 
optimizer between your ears, and whatever 
other interesting topics pop up in the 
meantime. 

Takeaway: A better understanding of 
optimization for modern hardware. 

Intended Audience: Technical programming 
experience, assembly language knowledge 
useful. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The Physics-Sound System of Deus Ex: 

Invisible War and Thief 3 

Brian Sharp See page 132 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 

A6, Convention Center 

Integrating a modern physics engine into a 
game these days can be tough; one big 
challenge is making the physics engine "play 
nice" with your game's other subsystems. 
Among those subsystems is the sound engine. 
When a heavy refrigerator falls onto a sloped 
wooden floor, slides a ways down, and then 
finally begins toppling end-over-end the rest 
of the way, your game needs to be playing the 
right crashing and banging and scraping 
noises to make the interaction feel truly 
visceral. 

This talk describes the solution developed at 
Ion Storm for the games Deus Ex: Invisible 
War and Thief 3. The system is used in both 
games to model the sounds of physical 
interactions of normal world objects as well as 
more specific objects, like bullets, rag-dolling 
human bodies, throwing knives, and hand- 
held melee weapons like crowbars and 
blackjacks. 



Both of these games use the Havok physics 
engine, although the approach and solution 
described pertains to a wide variety of rigid- 
body - perhaps even soft-body - physics 
systems. 

Beyond the technical implementation, this 
talk also goes into considerable detail about 
workflow issues and the toolset that enabled 
designers and sound designers to hook up 
sounds on a general-purpose basis, then 
override those sounds at any level, all the way 
down to special-casing sounds for two specific 
objects in a level colliding against one 
another. 

No programming lecture is complete without 
frequent demos, so expect some good show- 
and-tell,too. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave knowing the 
specific implementation details of Ion Storm's 
physics-sound system, but furthermore 
understand the approach taken to the 
workflow, the tools used to hook sounds into 
the game, and also the various "gotchas," 
issues that arose during development to do 
with the physics-sound system and the 
various solutions and workarounds for them. 

Intended Audience: This talk is intended for 
programmers who are not necessarily experts 
in any one area, but who have a reasonable 
familiarity with rigid-body physics simulation, 
sound engines, and object/property systems. 

Lecture - Advanced 

Practical Implementation of High Dynamic 

Range Rendering 

Masaki Kawase See page 127 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:303:30pm 

J3, Convention Center 

HDR rendering gives new expressions to game 
graphics. As understanding of HDR and DX9 
high precision buffer format becomes more 
common, real-time rendering 3D game 
engines are starting to take advantage of this 
technology. But because the current selection 
of hardware still has various limitations it 
cannot simulate HDR perfectly. 

To equip HDR with restricted hardware 
abilities, we have to solve various problems. 

For game real-time graphics, the visual 
expression attractiveness is more important 
than rendering accuracy. It is difficult to create 
attractive images just from more precise 
calculation. It is important to understand the 
differences between HDR and LDR and which 
is appropriate according to the type of 
expressions. 



This lecture should help clarify some of the 
problems when equipping HDR, introduce 
some techniques of HDR expressions that are 
possible to use on present hardware, DX8 and 
DX9, and indicate the expressions that can be 
advanced from HDR. 

<§» This lecture is simultaneously translated. 
Please arrive early to pick up your headset. 

Sponsored by NVIDIA 

Practical Performance Analysis and Tuning 

Ashu Rege See page 134 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 

A8, Convention Center 

This talk starts with an overview of 
performance tuning, including advice for the 
latest hardware and programming trends. In 
addition, the session makes the suggestions 
more tangible with a step-by-step case study 
of an actual game. This approach will allow 
attendees to see how to apply theory and 
tools effectively to improve performance. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn the theory behind 
performance tuning and see a practical 
example of how to apply theory and tools 
effectively to improve performance. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Practical Physics for Articulated 

Characters 

Vangelis Kokkevis See page 128 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 

J2, Convention Center 

Advances in video game technology are 
driving a growing demand for physics-based 
algorithms that can generate realistic, 
interactive digital character motion. 
Unfortunately, the currently available physics 
algorithms for articulated figures often stop 
short of providing the necessary tools for 
controlling and constraining the resulting 
motion in a robust and efficient manner. As a 
result, the use of physics for animating 
character motion in the current generation of 
video games is limited. 

This presentation describes a technique for 
implementing a fast and stable dynamics 
simulator for articulated characters using an 
analytical constraint approach combined with 
Featherstone's linear-time forward dynamics 
algorithm. It demonstrates an efficient new 
method for enforcing multiple simultaneous 
constraints on an articulated character in 
order to control the character's motion and 
model its interactions with the environment. 
The technique described employs an 



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optimized process derived from Featherstone's recursive algorithm to 
form a system of linear equations representing the constraint conditions 
at each time instant of the simulation. The system is subsequently 
solved to compute the exact magnitude of the forces necessary to 
satisfy these constraints. This talk demonstrates how a combination of 
unilateral and bilateral constraints can be used to model the effects of 
impacts and contacts, to enforce joint limits and to accurately control 
limb motion through trajectory following. The algorithms used are 
presented from a practical standpoint and pseudocode to facilitate their 
implementation are provided. Examples of interactive applications using 
the techniques described are presented. 

Takeaway: Attendees leave with a more solid understanding of the 
issues surrounding dynamics simulation of articulated characters, what 
the difficulties are and what options they have available. After attending 
this presentation and with the help of the accompanying material, a 
motivated practitioner should be able to implement a dynamics 
simulator based on the techniques described in this presentation. 

Intended Audience: Programmers with an interest in physics echniques 
and character animation. Some familiarity with basic physical 
simulation concepts would be helpful. Otherwise the presentation 
covers most of the necessary background material needed to follow the 
algorithms presented. 

Lecture - Intermediate - Expo Pass Session 
Practical Shadows: Out of the Demo and Into the Engine 
Tom Forsyth See page 123 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 
A3, Convention Center 

There are many shadowing algorithms available, such as blob shadows, 
shadow maps of various types, projective shadow maps, and stencil 
volume shadows. But they all have limitations, some of them work on 
some platforms and not others, each is appropriate for different 
situations. 

This lecture introduces each method and briefly discusses their major 
features and limitations. It then explores how to mix and match the 
various methods in a practical large-world engine on real console 
hardware. The lecture is mainly about the tricks and tips, where corners 
can be cut, when to use each technique, and the efficiency and 
scalability of each. The emphasis is using these methods in a practical 
game with large, complex and unconstrained scenes, rather than simply 
writing a technology demo. 

Takeaway: The lecture introduces the audience to the variety of 
shadowing algorithms available, and discusses when each is appropriate 
for the type of scene, the desired effect, and the available hardware. 

Lecture - Advanced 

Procedural Shaders: A Feature Animation Perspective 

David Hart, Arcot Preetham, Hector Yee 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 
J2, Convention Center 

Procedural shaders are textures generated from a small number of 
parameters. This talk compares the procedural shaders used in feature 
animation such as the Perlin Noise function, brick and fur shaders, and 
their real-time counterparts, explaining the tradeoffs required to bring 
them to real time. 



Takeaway: The attendees learn how movie shaders and real-time 
shaders differ, the trade-offs that must be made for writing real-time 
shaders, and which shader techniques are transferrable from the movie 
domain and which are not. 

Intended Audience: Graphics programmers who are writing procedural 
shaders benefit from the insight behind the design decisions made for 
feature animation shaders and how they apply to real-time shaders. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Programming the PlayStation Portable (PSP) 

Dave Coombes & Peter Young 

See pages 121 & 141 for bios 
Thursday, March 25 • 3~4pm 
B2, Convention Center 

The PlayStation Portable (PSP) is more similar to a game console than a 
traditional handheld. It is an exceptionally powerful device for a 
handheld gaming platform, and includes some innovative hardware 
features that enable new gameplay experiences. 

This presentation details the architecture and design of the PSP to as 
great an extent as possible. Key features that impact game design 
decisions are highlighted. Important production-related considerations 
are discussed. Software APIs and example program code are illustrated. 

Takeaway: Through our presentation, you gain a greater understanding 
of the amount of resources it will take to create a game for the 
PlayStation Portable. You also develop a clearer sense for the types of 
gameplay experiences that are enabled by the PSP's unique hardware. 

Intended Audience: Any attendee who is a capable game programmer or 
producer find this presentation educational. Those who are familiar with 
the process of ramping up on a new console prior to launch learn the 
most. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Real World Multi-Threading in PC Games 

Aaron Coday, William Damon, Maxim Perminov 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 
J2, Convention Center 

Multi-threading in games has been among the most challenging 
applications of multi-threading in the consumer space. The session 
presents three case studies of PC games, recently released, which have 
implemented multi-threading in order to take advantage of growing 
availability of multi-processor systems and Intel processors with hyper- 
threading technology. Came developers are using multi-threading either 
to enhance performance or add new features or both. The presenters 
describe the technical challenges faced by these developers and how 
they overcame them to signficantly enhance their games. Participants 
take away the knowledge of how to approach multi-threading their own 
games. 

Takeaway: Participants take away the knowledge of how to approach 
multi-threading their own games. 

Intended Audience: Attendees should have a general understanding of 
multi-threaded programming concepts and C++. 




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Lecture - Intermediate 

Realistic and Fast Cloud Rendering in 

Computer Games 

Niniane Wang See page 739 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 

J2, Convention Center 

Clouds play an important role in many games, 
particularly flight simulators where the sky 
takes up the majority of the rendered scene. 
This lecture presents a photorealistic cloud 
rendering system which extends clusters of 
texture splatted particles to model a dozen 
cloud types (e.g. stratus, cumulus congestus, 
cumulonimbus) with a 100-fold performance 
improvement over previous systems. 

Compared with previous games which 
modeled one type of cumulus cloud, the 
variety in cloud types produces a higher level 
of realism. The system models each cloud via a 
cluster of textured sprites, and "mixes-and- 
matches" 16 textures to photorealistically 
produce cloud types such as nimbostratus and 
altocumulus with low video memory cost. The 
clouds look realistic from all camera angles 
and distances. 

The cloud creation process uses custom- 
written plug-ins to 3D Studio Max to give 
artists immediate visual feedback and 
complete control over the result, essential to 
producing high-quality content. 

The cloud system achieves fast performance 
across a variety of PC configurations. It ships 
with Microsoft Flight Simulator 2004: A 
Century of Flight, where it maintains 20-60 
frames per second in typical user scenarios, 
including scenes of dense overcast clouds on 
low-end PCs. It achieves this performance by 
using an octagonal ring of dynamically 
generated impostors to reduce overdraw. 

The shading model approximates ambient sky 
light and directional sun light, and allows 
artistic control without complex runtime 
computations. Sky light controls the brightness 
of clouds and gives cumulus clouds darker 
bottoms. Directional light creates dramatic 
shadows and interesting color variations, partic- 
ularly appealing at dawn and dusk. 

Finally, the cloud system allows animation of 
forming and dissipating clouds, by adjusting 
the alpha transparency on individual sprites. 
Changing the clouds over time in this way 
enhances the realism factor in games. 

Takeaway: The audience learns about a cloud 
rendering system which produces realistic 
clouds spanning a dozen cloud types, such as 



stratus, altocumulus, and cumulonimbus. They 
learn how it achieves performance of 20-60 
frames per second in typical user scenarios, 
including rendering scenes of dense overcast 
clouds. They learn about the shading model 
which grants a high degree of artistic control 
to yield beautiful results, particularly at 
sunrise and sunset. They gain knowledge of 
how to simulate cloud formation and 
dissipation in this system. 

Intended Audience: The intended audience is 
programmers, artists, and producers who are 
interested in rendering clouds within a game. 
Understanding of fundamental graphics 
concepts such as video memory and sprites is 
assumed. 

Lecture - Advanced 
Real-Time Global Illumination 
Eskil Steenberg See page 138 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 
A6, Convention Center 

The session explores how real-time global 
illumination game engines can be create on 
current hardware. A brief history on various 
global illumination techniques is given and 
then the presenter explores how they can be 
adopted in to real-time 3D engines. He also 
discusses brand new approaches targeted 
directly at the real-time field. 

Takeaway: Attendees come away with a bag of 
tricks that can be used to drastically enhance 
the look of any particular game. The presenter 
explore many different ways to see the same 
problem and how that can give added insight 
to the problem of global illumination. 

Intended Audience: This session is best suited 
for graphics programmers and engine 
designers. It requires no special knowledge of 
any particular hardware platform, but a 
general understanding of computer graphics 
is essential. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Real-Time Translucent Animated Objects 

Simon Green & Greg James 

See pages 124 & ujfor bios, 
Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 
J2, Convention Center 

Volume rendering and true volumetric effects 
don't have to involve complex data represen- 
tations, 3D volume textures, or pre-processing 
computations. Instead, ordinary polygon 
objects and animated character models can be 
rendered directly as light-scattering and light- 
absorbing thick volumes of material. Any 



closed 3D hull, regardless of it's shape or depth 
complexity, can be rendered to have a color or 
transparency based on it's thickness at each 
pixel on screen. Many volume objects can be 
rendered at once, and they can intersect any 
solid objects in the scene. Complex 
intersection cases are properly handled by 
using just one render-to-texture pass and 
reading the result whenever needed. The 
technique builds on previous real-time and 
offline rendering approaches, and has solved 
the problems of aliased thickness values, low 
depth precision, and poor handling of 
intersections that plagued these approaches. 

Takeaway: With DX8 and DX9 hardware, it is 
very easy to render ordinary game geometry 
and animated objects as thick translucent 
volumes of fog, smoke, light-scattering, and 
light-absorbing material. No pre-processing, 
volume textures, or complex additional data is 
required, and the method of rendering 
ordinary objects as thick volumes integrates 
seamlessly with other 3D rendering. The 
technique enables rich effects for animated 
volume fog, x-ray images, and realistic 
translucency which are easy to author and 
control. Other implementations have 
problems of aliased thickness values, low 
depth precision, and poor intersection 
handling, but these have all been overcome to 
yield high precision, smooth, dithered volumes 
at high frame rates. 

Intended Audience: This talk is intended for 
game programmers with a basic knowledge of 
DirectX 9 or OpenGL. The majority of the talk 
presents the fundamental techniques, 
concepts, and uses on a level suitable for 
artists and game designers, though plenty of 
technical details are provided to give 
programmers a solid grasp of the approach 
and the ability to work with it on their own. A 
basic understanding of vertex and pixel 
shaders is recomended. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Reusing Shading for Interactive Global 

Illumination 

Kavita Bala & Bruce Walter 

See pages nj & 739 for bios 
Thursday, March 25 • g-io^oam 
A6, Convention Center 

Recently there has been increased interest in 
interactive techniques for high-quality 
shading effects such as global illumination. 
However, many of these effects remain too 
expensive to compute at interactive speeds. 
This session presents recent techniques that 
reuse shading information to bridge the gap 



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PROGRAMMING TRACK 



between slow shading and fast interactive image update. 

The common approach in all these systems is that shading is sparsely 
sampled and reconstructed for interactive rendering. This session covers 
several recent techniques including image-based techniques, mesh- 
based approaches, and four-dimensional approaches. This session also 
reviews key concepts in global illumination, and describe the state of the 
art in fast ray tracing. 

The techniques that are discussed include frameless rendering, image 
warping, the render cache and edge-and-point rendering, shading cache 
and corrective texturing, and four dimensional approaches such as 4D 
radiance interpolants and holodeck. Fast ray tracers such as GPU-based 
and CPU-accelerated approaches are also discussed. 

Takeaway: The takeaway idea is that interactive techniques to compute 
high-quality shading such as global illumination are looking increasingly 
promising. These approaches automatically achieve a high level of 
realism. Additionally approaches, such as fast ray tracing, scale 
extremely well to complex scenes. 

Intended Audience: Practitioners interested in adding global illumi- 
nation effects to interactive systems. This course assumes some basic 
familiarity with ray tracing. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Revisiting the Standard Joint Hierarchy: Improving Realistic 

Modeling of Articulated Characters 

Victor Ng-Thow-Hing See page 132 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

Bi, Convention Center 

The characters in modern videogames continue to be updated with 
improving surface geometry and real-time rendering effects with each 
incarnation of graphics hardware. In contrast, the standard joint 
hierarchy used to animate these same characters has changed little 
since it first started appearing in graphics applications in the 1980s. 
Although simple to implement, a great deal of realism in joint articu- 
lation for human characters is compromised. The flexible spine in the 
torso is often reduced to a few rigid links. The shoulder is often 
simplified as a three-axis gimbal joint, probably causing many of the 
difficulties of animating geometry around that region. The joint 
hierarchy is fundamental to many key processes in game development, 
from skeleton fitting with motion-captured data to skin-enveloping 
algorithms whose deformations are weighted by the underlying joint 
transformations. A great deal can be gained if one can update the 
hierarchy with more biomechanical realism. 

This session presents several biomechanical enhancements that can 
capture more realistic behavior of joints in articulated figures. These 
new joints are capable of handling non orthogonal, non-intersecting 
axes of rotation and changing joint centers that are often found in the 
kinematics of real anatomical joints. Coordinated movement and 
dependencies among several joints are realized. Although the joint 
behavior may appear complex, the simplicity of controls for the 
animator is retained by providing a small set of intuitive handles. An 
animator is restricted from putting the skeleton in an infeasible pose. 
The presenter illustrates these concepts with detailed and realistic 
human spine and shoulder models exhibiting real-time performance 
and simple controls for the animator. 

Takeaway: Audience members obtain an awareness of several important 



biomechanical principles that can be adopted to create more realistic 
joints. Joints can be madedependent on each other to create realistic 
coordinations while maintaining a simple set of animator controls. Non- 
orthogonal joint axes with changing joint centers are important for 
articulations in the spine and shoulder. Joint cones can provide physio- 
logical limits to model limb motions such as circumduction (audience 
members also learn what this term means). Finally, it is sometimes 
necessary to de-couple joints in the hierarchy to obtain more intuitive 
degrees of freedom for character animation. 

Sponsored by Trymedia 

The Security Bottom Line 

John Borland, Gavin Dodd, Andrew Shane Huang 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 
C4, Convention Center 

A panel shares their real-life experiences and advice on the most 
effective means of protecting games, including some that didn't work so 
well. Learn what methods have been most successful for different types 
of games and distribution methods, when you need to think about 
security and what security implementations publishers are looking for 
from their developers, cnet's John Borland will moderate the panel. 

Takeaway: The most effective strategies for game protection from a 
panel of your peers who've been there. 

Intended Audience: Producers and managers responsible for game 
security decision-making, including developers who self-publish their 
games. 

Sponsored by Trymedia 

Security In An Unsecured Environment 

George Goodman 

Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 
C4, Convention Center 

An Intel security expert talks about game protection in an inherently 
vulnerable environment -the PC. Your game will be cracked, it's just a 
matter of time. This session is designed to let you decide when, how or 
even if you should be doing anything about it. Topics include: 

- Understanding the security lifecycle: prevention, detection, response, 
healing 

- Pros/cons of integrating security actively into your product 

- Security and Trusted Computing 

Takeaway: An in-depth understanding of the latest issues and trends 
around protecting game content. 

Intended Audience: Producers and programmers who oversee game 
protection strategy and develop in-game security for PC games. 

Sponsed by Intel 
Simulating Cloth and Clothing 
Dean Macri See page 130 for bio 
Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 
Ai, Convention Center 

This class presents a high-performance implementation of current 
academic research in clothing simulation. The recent advancements in 





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PROGRAMMING TRACK 



solving the cloth simulation problem will be 
examined and an implementation showing 
how to use modern processors to do the 
simulations in real-time will be given. Topics 
covered will include collision detection and 
response and source code and demos will be 
available. 

Takeaway: Developers will be able to apply the 
techniques to clothing for characters in 
upcoming games. 

Intended Audience: Intermediate. Knowledge 
of C++ and an understanding of 3D graphics 
and physical simulation will make it easier to 
understand. 

Sponsored by Intel 

Speeding Up Games Using the Tuning 

Assistant and Sampling Over Time Views in 

the Intel VTune Performance Analyzer 7.1 

Gary Carleton 

Friday, March 26 • io:30-ii:3opm 

Ai, Convention Center 

The VTune™ Performance Analyzer uses event- 
based interrupts to allow game developers to 
see where game execution time is being spent 
within the game's source code. The Tuning 
Assistant expert system translates this data 
into prioritized analysis and meaningful 
advice on improving performance. The 
Sampling Over Time visualization helps 
programmers see how performance changes 
over time, and visualize changing loads on the 
CPU. This lecture explains the above 
technologies, and shows how the VTune 
Analyzer ties them together to help 
programmers quickly find opportunities to 
maximize game performance on the latest PC 
hardware. 

Takeaway: The audience learns how to use 
some of the new technologies in the VTune™ 
Analyzer to improve game performance. 

Intended Audience: This class is intended for 
programmers who want to maximize game 
performance on the latest PC hardware. 

Round-table - Advanced 

Taking Game Physics Beyond Eye Candy 

David Wu See page 140 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-5pm 

Santa Clara II, Hilton 

Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 

Santa Clara I, Hilton 

Physics has the potential to significantly 
impact game play. In some cases it can 
completely define it. Physics developers are 



faced with a number of hurdles, more often 
than not, physics use is scaled back from an 
active component of the system to a passive 
one, whose primary roll is to generate eye 
candy. 

Hurdles that developers face include: 

- Designers tend to like discrete systems that 
are easy to understand and control 

- Implementation is non trivial, and buggy 
physics systems can be very frustrating 

- Many of the ideas that developers would like 
to try are limited by performance constraints. 

In this roundtable the presenters discuss 
means of overcomming these hurdles, with 
techniques, ideas, and real world concrete 
examples. 

Takeaway: The intended takeaway are ideas of 
when and how to use physics, techniques to 
overcome performance constraints, and 
techniques to create stable, robust, and usable 
physics. 

Intended Audience: The intended audience is 
for physics programmers, game programmers 
looking to use phyics, and designers interested 
in applying physics to their designs. 

Roundtable - Advanced 
Technical Issues in Tools Development 
John Walker & Dave Weinstein 

See pages 759 & 140 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 
Santa Clara II, Hilton 
Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 
Santa Clara I, Hilton 
Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 
Santa Clara II, Hilton 

Traditionally, it's been common for tools to be 
considered scutwork, assigned to junior 
programmers, and with low requirements for 
stability and usability. Modern games require 
dedicated tools programmers, or even entire 
tools teams. With the increasing demand for 
quality and custom tools, and the scope of the 
game content in a modern title, what 
techniques have programmers found to 
effectively (and maintainably) meet the needs 
of artists and designers. 

Takeaway: A better understanding of the 
benefits and drawbacks of in-engine 
embedded tools, plugins, scripts, macros, and 
dedicated stand alone tools. 

A better understanding of "right sizing" tools; 
when is the proper tool a one-off, and when 



are tools likely to need to be overengineered 
for the long haul. 

A better understanding of the tradeoffs of 
various APIs, languages, and user interface tools. 

"Best practices" in building tools that work 
against non-PC target platforms (i.e. consoles, 
PDAs, mobile phones, etc). 

Intended Audience: Programmers, especially in 
senior positions. Technical artists, art and 
design leads, and producers may find parts of 
the roundtable useful, but the technical 
aspects are expected to dominate. Experience 
with existing tools and product lifecycles is 
desired, as that provides the detailed 
experiences needed. 

Sponsored by NVIDIA 

Tools to Squeeze Maximum Performance 

from Your GPU 

Sebastien Domine & Christopher Maughan 

See pages 122 & 130 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 
A8, Convention Center 

Leveraging our intimate knowledge of the 
GPU and driver, NVIDIA has produced a suite 
of performance analysis and optimization 
tools that expose critical performance metrics. 
Given the complexity of today's GPUs, 
graphical effects, and game engines, it is more 
important than ever to take advantage of all 
the tools that are available to you when 
creating, debugging and tuning your games. 
In this talk, the NVIDIA will showcase their 
more recent tools, including NVPerfHUD, FX 
Composer, and other current projects. 

Takeaway: Attendees learn about several 
useful tools that NVIDIA provides to help 
them with their development process. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

True Crime: Streets of LA. - Bringing Crime 

to the City of Angels 

Jeff Lander, Nick Marks, Richard Yeh 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
Thursday, March 25 • 4:i5-5:i5pm 
B2, Convention Center 

In the recently released game, True Crime: 
Streets of L.A., we created a 240 square mile 
city that players could explore from end to 
end. We then had to fill it with citizens and 
not a small amount of criminal activity. This 
session discusses the techniques we used and 
the problems we encountered in bringing the 
city to life. We needed to create a character 
system that would seamlessly blend innocent 



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PROGRAMMING TRACK 



character behaviors with a complete fighting and shooting techniques. 
The design also relied heavily on both scripted and emergent behavior 
as a core part of gameplay both out in the city and in the interior set 
pieces. Showing the action also depended on the interaction of a variety 
of camera models. Key topics in the session are character animation and 
behavioral Al, interaction between kinematic objects and the physics 
system, real-time cinematography, and collision detection and testing. 

Takeaway: Attendees of this session learn of the issues and difficulties 
of creating a game which is very dependent on complex character 
interactions on a very large scale. Artificial Intelligence, kinematic 
animation, and physics systems are combined to allow for a great deal 
of emergent gameplay. The session also cover the techniques used to 
generate the scenarios and script the actual action. 

Intended Audience: Attendees should be familiar with hierarchical 
character animation systems as well as kinematic animation techniques 
such as inverse kinematics. Al concepts will be discussed so knowledge 
of issues such as state machines and pathfinding would be useful. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Using Verlet Integration and Constraints in a Six Degree of 

Freedom Rigid Body Physics Simulation 

Rick Baltman & Ron Radeztsky Jr See pages 118 & 134 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 

Bi, Convention Center 

At the 1999 GDC, Thomas Jacobsen presented a Verlet-integrated, three 
degree of freedom (DOF), rigid body physics simulation. The simulation 



has the desirable qualities of stable integration, through the use of a 
semi-implicit integrator without the need to compute expensive force 
derivatives, simple implementation of constraints and the ability to 
integrate stiff systems. However, the simulation was limited because it 
did not integrate the rotational equations of motion, necessitating large 
numbers of constraints to simulate hinge, angle, and other joint 
constraints. 

By extending the simulation to six degrees of freedom through the 
Verlet integration of a state quaternion, joint constraints become simple 
and straightforward, though a slightly more complicated constraint 
equation is required. Two methods for implementing the additional 
degrees of freedom are presented: one that uses the current quaternion 
and last quaternion as the system states and one that uses the 
quaternion and the angular rate. The advantages and disadvantages of 
both methods are discussed. The equations used in pin and angle 
constraints and the method for resolving collisions are provided. The 
implementation of this physics simulation is demonstrated through its 
use in the game MX UNLEASHED, published by THO. 

Takeaway: The attendees learn a new technique for integrating 
equations of motion that is both stable and robust. This method allows 
constraints to be developed quickly and intuitively. Collision response is 
also simple and computationally fast. The constraints used to assemble 
a rag-doll simulation are presented. 

Intended Audience: Game or animation physics programmers benefit 
the most by attending this presentation. The ability to read and use 
vector math is required, and a basic understanding of calculus and 
quaternions assist in the immediate comprehension of the lecture. 




GameDevelopers 

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-109- 



VISUAL ARTS KEYNOTES 



Free from many technological constraints, the focus of game art is shifting from simply 
attaining the best possible production quality to exploring new ideas and art styles that 
allow a game to stand out from the competition. In parallel, Visual Arts in the game 
industry has grown incredibly complex. This year, the Visual Arts track provides longer 
format classes to allow speakers the time to walk attendees step by step through the latest 
tools and techniques. Each class will be self-contained to provide the specific practical 
knowledge of advanced techniques to take game art in new directions. 





From Visual Anti-Establishmentarianism To Ubiquity & Back 

John Gaeta 

Friday, March 26 • 12-ipm 
Ji, Convention Center 



Join John Gaeta, senior VFX Supervisor of the Matrix Trilogy, for a "stream of consciousness style" discussion regarding any one or more of the 
following topics: Computer Graphics for curing the criminally insane, high concept in a slow sucking vacuum, making a decision, how to 
destroy expensive motion picture cameras, hilariously violent yet enriching art forms, creative empowerment for the average joe, how to 
supervise the shattered, passion and heartbreak, applied focus and will, visualizing a way through, the evolution of hypnotic three 
dimensional television for the purpose of population passification, how to make a bad shot, subconscious design tips, talking like you know, 
the rise of telekinetic programming, the reincarnation of Virtual Cinema, moving faster then Hollywood bullets, schooling your grandparents 
on a PlayStation 3, imagining super humans, the monopolization and collapse of the visual effects industry, the gold standard, how producers 
kill, visual chaos, forgiveness, greed, respect for the past, the next thirty years of what?, sleeping dogs on hot summer days, the death of 
Matrix, how to switch it on, the persistence of Japan, light as super glue, how to properly set fire to hard drives, the business of immortality, 
selling intellectual property on the black market, why bringing your addictions to work is ill advised, how to convince people that your ideas 
are actually their own, finding inner peace in a world gone crazy, some other visual effects stuff, whatever you want to talk about. 

Takeaway: We are tumbling near the leading edge of a virtual "Big Bang". Within our lifetimes, we will witness and originate whole new 
visual experiences. 

Intended Audience: Any visual graphics artist, engineer or enthusiast whom desires a first hand exchange on what it's like to design, 
organize, administrate, or just survive on a massivly complex, multi-faceted motion picture franchise like Matrix. 

John Gaeta 

John Gaeta is best known for his work creating visual effects for The Matrix. This effort allowed for the nomination and winning of an 
Academy Award and BAFTA in 2000. Joel headed up the effects supervision project for The Matrix. Conceiving and testing the Matrix bullet 
time effects began in early 1996. And in fact this work directly overlapped R&D for What Dreams May Come. The makers considered the 
technique only a representation of what a virtual camera may look like but not the true technology it suggested. Shortly after the release of 
the original The Matrix (1999), John continued his exploration of film shot design through visualization by creating simple fully virtual 
scenes to be played and composed in real-time on prototype Sony PlayStation 3 technology. John has just finished overseeing visual effects 
for the final chapter, Revolutions. Previous to that came the release of Reloaded last May. 



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•110- www.gdconf.com 



VISUAL ARTS KEYNOTES 




The History of Animation 



Phil Tippett 

Thursday, March 25 
Salon IV, Marriott 



4:i5-5:i5pm 



Having parlayed the study of Ray Harryhausen's pioneering work in stop-motion animation into a career spanning The Empire Strikes Back, 
Return of the Jedi.Dragonslayer, Robocop, Jurassic Park, and Starship Troopers, presenter Phil Tippett is uniquely qualified to deliver an 
insider's view on the history of animation. Phil's talk takes a wide-angle view, tracing the development of animation from cave drawings 
and sculpture, to early and experimental stop-motion, up to today's CG animation. 

Phil Tippett 

Phil Tippett, founder of Berkeley-based Tippett Studio, is a movie director and an award-winning Visual Effects Supervisor and Producer, who 
specializes in creature design and character animation. He has earned two Oscars out of six nominations, as well as two Emmys. In 1978, Phil 
headed the ILM animation department with Jon Berg for The Empire Strikes Back. By 1983 Phil led the famed Lucasfilm creature shop for 
Return of the Jedi for which he was awarded his first Oscar in 1984. In 1983 Tippett Studio was born when Phil left ILM and set up a studio. In 
1985 producer Jon Davison hired Phil to create the animated robot sequences for Robocop. In 1991, Steven Spielberg selected Phil to 
supervise animation on 50 dinosaur shots for Jurassic Park and earned a second Oscar. In 1995, Tippett Studio was hired to create the giant, 
hostile alien arachnids for Starship Troopers. Phil has since supervised animation and effects on such films at Virus, My Favorite Martian, The 
Haunting and Evolution. 



Workflow Convergence: How Motion Picture Pipelines 
Are Merging With Came Development 

"DJ"John DesJardin 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 
Salon IV, Marriott 




From establishing pipelines for visual effects workflow on Matrix Reloaded and Matrix Revolutions and fitting some of that work into the 
Enter the Matrix game, it has become increasingly clear that the methods used to produce complex filmed entertainment can help 
structure complex "polymedia" entertainment. By looking at some of the visual effects work in the recent Matrix films from concepts to 
research and development of effects techniques to shooting and final compositing, attendees can get an idea of the time, effort, and team 
structure required to achieve a level of desired compexity in final filmed images. In recent years we've all seen an increase in interactive 
platform performance, allowing for realtime images and simulations that deliver ever-increasing realistic detail. It is my hope that exposing 
the methods and structures of these types of visuals will aid attendees in assessing and creating new exciting game/film entertainment. 

John DesJardin 

John (DJ) DesJardin has been creating visual effects for nearly 20 years with a body of work comprising over 30 films. A film graduate, DJ 
moved to Los Angeles with the desire to create unique and innovative effects, surf the Pacific Ocean and uphold the ideals of Batman. 
Those goals remain the same to this day. 

DJ began his career working with those responsible for the groundbreaking technology used to create the effects in Blade Runner and Close 
Encounters of the Third Kind. Suddenly part of this new genre of films that used effects as integral film making tools, DJ found himself 
producing graphics and effects in films such as Short Circuit, Star Trek IV and Alien 3. Soon thereafter, he began creating high resolution CGI 
for Darkman, Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey, Predator 2, Terminator 2 and Free Willy. Eventually, DJ moved into the role of Digital Effects 
Supervisor working on many films including, TimeCop, Dolores Claiborne, Ghost in the Machine, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (the movie), 
Broken Arrow, From Dusk till Dawn and The Relic. 

In more recent years, DJ's accomplishments have been in the role of Visual Effects Supervisor on several projects including End of Days, This 
Present Darkness (test), Firestorm and The Astronaut's Wife. As a Senior Visual Effects Supervisor at MVFX (Manex Visual Effects), DJ oversaw 
3D effects work on Mission: Impossible 2, Crouching Tiger/Hidden Dragon and Almost Famous as well as several commercials, including 
Mountain Dew's "Spaceship". He also led the pre-production early look development for The Matrix 2 & 3. Before joining the main 
production team of The Matrix sequels as a Visual Effects Supervisor, DJ supervised effects shots for Swordfish and Queen of the Damned. DJ 
has just completed work as Visual Effects Supervisor on The Matrix-. Reloaded and The Matrix: Revolutions. 

John (DJ) DesJardin is a founding member of the Visual Effects Society and is currently serving on the VES Board of Directors. 



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Lecture - Intermediate 
Acting for Animators 
Ed Hooks See page 126 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 9-io:3oam 
Fi, Convention Center 

Introduction and discussion of essential acting 
principles and theory, orienting in particular to 
the connections between thinking, emotion 
and physical action. Attendees should, even 
with a two-hour time frame, come away with 
a good understanding of character impulse 
and motivation in performance, scene 
construction, mechanisms of empathy. The 
workshop touchs on how to create a deeper 
and more complex emotional response in the 
player. 

Takeaway: Animators, programmers, 
designers, mocap artists. No prior knowledge 
of acting is necessary for this class. It is also 
worth noting that students in Acting for 
Animators are not be required to get up on 
their feet and perform. This workshop focuses 
on acting theory for animators, which is a very 
different perspective than acting theory for 
stage actors. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Advanced Shader Workflow with 3DS Max 

Speaker TBD 

Wednesday, March 24 • 9-ioam 
Salon III, Marriott 

Whether you are using DirectX shaders or 
shaders for pre-rendered cinematics, this 
session covers creating and tweaking shaders 
in 3DS Max. An industry expert showcases 
advanced techniques for building highly 
engaging textures and pre-baked lighting. 

Sponsored by Discreet 
Animation of Mass Destruction 
Andy Murdock See page 132 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • i-3pm 
C3, Convention Center 

It's true, in video games we are constantly 
blowing stuff up. Learn how to use Particle 
Flow and Afterburn in 3ds max to create lovely 
mushroom clouds, assorted fireballs, smoke 
trails and eye candy chaos for use in your 
game cinematics. 

Sponsored by Discreet 

The Art and Science of Character Rigging 

Paul Neale See page 132 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 4-6pm 

C3, Convention Center 

This session will cover the techniques and 



philosophy behind character rig design in 3ds 
max. It is often forgotten that the role of a TD 
is to make rigs that not only get the job done 
but are artist friendly. Paul explains his 
approach to tackling this problem. Along the 
way you will get a look at designing control 
interfaces with custom attributes, adding 
functionality to rigs through scripted 
controllers and more. This discussion is not 
games specific but instead is designed to be 
useful to artists in all industries. 

Roundtable - Intermediate 
Art Management for Artists 
Doug Oglesby See page 732 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 
D, Convention Center 
Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 
L, Convention Center 

This roundtable discusses issues of running a 
team of artists as lead artist, focusing on 
topics that inexperienced managers need to 
address. Some suggestions are made, but the 
point of the discussion is to provide a chance 
to share solutions to common problems. 

Takeaway: Attendees of this roundtable walk 
away with a rough framework for thinking 
about how to organize and facilitate a team of 
artists. Attendees learn what is expected of a 
lead, as opposed to a rank-and-file artist. They 
discuss the drawbacks of a lead position. They 
have a sense of the perks and advantages of a 
lead position. And, finally, attendees have 
some practical advice for both being part of a 
management team and organizing a project 
with the team that reports to you. 

Intended Audience: This roundtable is aimed 
at current lead artists who have little or no 
experience with managing a project, and at 
more experienced lead artists who are going 
to share their knowledge. 

Sponsored by Alias 

Automatic Animation with Al. implant for 

Maya 

Dr. Paul Kruszewski See page 128 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • g-ioam 

Ci, Convention Center 

The session shows a tool and workflow to 
help animators produce much larger 
quantities and much higher quality 
animation. Using the example of animating 
large numbers of intelligently moving 
characters on rough terrain, the session will 
show how to use Al. implant for Maya. We will 
show worflow for creating hundreds of boned 
and skinned characters and stampeding them 



over rough terrain without collisions or foot 
slippage. That is, characters do not interpen- 
etrate. And as characters go up and down hill 
animation correctly and automatically scales 
and blends to produce appropriate changes in 
velocity and skeletal angulation. Finally, we 
show how this baked data can be exported to 
a real-time SDK so that crowds can react in 
real time to their environment on PCs and 
consoles. 

Takeaway: An understanding of how 
"automatic animation" using Al. implant for 
Maya works, and how it enables small teams 
of animators to create complex large scale 
crowd cinematics without programmer 
assistance. 

Intended Audience: 3D animators and 
programmers who desire to create more 
characters with better animations in less time. 
Basic understanding of clip based animation 
required. Technical direction experience (e.g., 
MEL scripting) is a plus. 

Roundtable - All 

Beyond the Rubber Pencil: State of the Art 

Tools 

Stephen Theodore See page 738 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 

D, Convention Center 

Thursday, March 25 • 9-ioam 

L, Convention Center 

Friday, March 26 • 2:30-3:3opm 

L, Convention Center 

This roundtable brings together artists from a 
variety of game art disciplines for an open- 
format discussion of what works and what 
doesn't in contemporary tools. 

We want to air gripes, suggestions and wish- 
lists for animation packages, paint programs, 
level design tools and any other software that 
affects the working life of a games artist. We 
also want to discuss ways in which game 
artist can leverage our positions to get better 
input on future developments in our tools 
packages. 

Takeaway: Participants should come away 
with a sense of how well the current game art 
tool set serves the needs of game artists. 
Hopefully the session also evolve effective 
strategies for lobbying tools vendors to be 
more responsive to the needs of the games 
industry. 

Intended Audience: This session is open to all 
working artists. Students m in-house tools 
programmers, and art tools vendors are also 
encouraged to attend. 



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VISUAL ARTS TRACK 




Lecture - Intermediate 
Building Collum 
Bay Raitt See page 734 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 12-ipm 
J2, Convention Center 

Go behind the scenes building Gollum's face with Bay Raitt, the creature 
facial lead responsible for building Gollum's facial system used in new 
line cinema's Lord of the Rings trilogy. Bay covers the design, rigging, and 
setup issues involved in creating a synthetic actor that can respond to 
direction to deliver a compelling dramatic performance. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Character Rigger's Cookbook 
Stephen Theodore See page 138 for bio 
Friday, March 26 • 911am 
Salon IV, Marriott 

This course is a complete overview of intermediate and advanced 
character rigging. It assumes a basic knowledge of an animation 
package (either 3D Studio Max, Maya, or Softimage). It's intended for 
animators and TDs who want to move beyond the basics to advanced 
topics in rigging. 

The course walks through the construction of a humanoid skeleton and 
rig from head to toe. The presenter covers at least two alternative 
strategies for all of the main body parts, and develops a set of strategies 
for matching the rigging technique to your application. Along the way 
he works out a library of reusable tricks which can easily be adapted to 
other situations. Finally he discusses interface techniques and standards 
that will make it easier for you and your teammates to work with the 
rigs you create. 

Takeaway: Attendees should come away with a good understanding of 
the state of the art in character rigging and a library of good solutions 
to common rigging problems. 

Intended Audience: This course assumes working knowledge of at least 
one major animation package and a good grasp of the basic vocabulary. 
The intended audience consists of animators and TDs who have a basic 
working knowledge of rigging and want to move up to a higher level 
strategic overview of the rigging process. 

Sponsored by Alias 

Creating In-Game Lighting Effects in Maya 

Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 
Ci, Convention Center 

See Addendum for description. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Creating Water and Fluid Effects For Video Games 

Susie Green See page 124 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

Fi, Convention Center 

The treatments of water in video games are as numerous as the artists 
who have created them. Working with only a few different variables 
such as transparency, colour, lighting and texture, it is possible to create 
stunning effects. A hint of reflection in a deep pool can bring an 
unexpected depth to a game world, and is surprisingly cheap and easy 



to implement. 

Using illustrations from a variety of games, this lecture compares the 
way these variables were used and how they affect the character of the 
water. 

Each area is covered in detail with demonstrations of how the work can 
be reproduced and the technical skills needed to achieve this. The 
lecture includes a discussion of how these variables can be transferred 
to use in other areas of game graphics, such as swirling gases, plasma 
effects, alien characters, and any wet or reflective surface. In some cases 
techniques are demonstrated to make the artists life easier, for example 
shortcuts to creating animated tileable textures. 

There is a discussion on the fluid effects that can be achieved through 
coding, when the use of these is appropriate, how they affect the style 
of the game, and how they should integrate with the artists work. 

The lecture is intended to be of a practical nature, discussing techniques 
that the audience finds of use to them in the making of their own 
games. 

Takeaway: The audience should leave knowing the options available to 
them when creating fluid in games. They will be inspired by the 
examples shown of other artists work, and learn the skills needed to 
reproduce them. 

Intended Audience: Pretty much all games introduce fluid at some point, 
so this lecture should be of interest to any artists who are involved in 
game development. Those who have worked with fluid before are 
interested to see how other artists have approached the problem. 
Attendees only need basic knowledge of creating art for video games. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Digital Painting, and The Narrowing Gap Between Games and Film 

Paul Topolos See page 138 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • g-ioam 

Salon IV, Marriott 

Digital painting is visual storytelling, whether it is a small texture for a 
Nintendo 64 game or a matte painting projected 60 feet across in a 
movie theater. These paintings are a form of art, and can convey 
emotion, location, detail, history, and character. Every one of them 
isimportant in telling the story, and we as artists can either contribute 
to this art form or detract from it. 

Having spent years in both games and in film, I've been finding that 
there are few differences between them now. There are more bells and 
whistles in film and the images can be bigger, but the actual painting is 
pretty similiar, and the rules that help guide good art from bad are 
exactley the same. This session talks about the creation of a coherent 
look, and the emotional and technical reasons for the artistic decisions. 
We look at paintings for games, film pre visualization, concept art, and 
feature film matte painting. Hopefully the speech is going to be funny 
as well. 

Anyone interested in the visual side of film and games can benefit. 

Takeaway: For the first time there are relatively few differences between 
how we approach visual themes in games and in film. The rules are 
similar with the main obstacle being our own ability to think creatively. 



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VISUAL ARTS TRACK 



Sponsored by Discreet 
Discreet Certified 3DS Max Plug-ins: Plug- 
ins Within the Pipeline 
Beau Perschall See page 133 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • io:45am-i2pm 
C3, Convention Center 

Learn how to leverage the use of Discreet 
Certified 3ds max Plug-ins to solve the many 
complexities faced by today's game 
developers. This session will be led by Beau 
Perschall from Turbo Squid as well as guest 
presenters from cutting-edge game studios. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

The Emotional Heart of Art Direction 

Chris Klug See page 128 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 9-ioam 

Salon III, Marriott 

Art directors in traditional media (film, TV, 
theater) approach their design assignments, 
regardless of what they might be, pretty much 
in the same manner and use similar 
vocabulary to communicate. They start by 
searching for the "emotional heart" of the 
assignment, determine what it is, and then 
base their design on that foundation. 
Regardless of the client or the delivery 
medium.they all use a similar process. 

Technical considerations affect the manner in 
which the design expresses itself, but everything 
starts by finding this emotional heart. Art 
direction in games could benefit greatly from 
understanding what this technique is and how 
to use it to improve and inform the visual 
design, facilitate communicate with their peers, 
and give themselves a powerful tool to improve 
their work. 

This seminar teaches this technique, using 
examples from real projects and actual art 
direction from these traditions. Far beyond 
simply visual fluff, this technique might be the 
most powerful tool in an art director's 
toolbox. The talk discusses how this emotional 
heart can be used not only to guide and 
inform a game's art direction, but also 
facilitate communication with team members, 
as well as help manage both staff artists as 
well as outside contractors. 

Takeaway: Attendees come away with better 
tools to create a visual image they can use to 
inform and guide any style they develop for a 
new title, as well as an understanding of why 
this is crucial for better art direction. They 
learn how to discover this image, how to use it 
to communicate with other artists they 
manage, and how to use it to filter and 



prioritize their day-to-day design decisions. 

Intended Audience: This seminar is of most 
benefit to art directors, but is also of use to all 
visual artists, especially those who have not 
gone through a theatrical design program or 
who are self-taught. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Exploring 3DS Max and MAXscript 
Speaker TBD 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:304:30pm 
Salon III, Marriott 

Expert 3D users and novices benefit from this 
two hour in-depth review of the 3DS Max 
MAXscript language, learn how to approach 
creating scripts and plug-ins with clean, easy 
to read code and learn advanced tips and 
tricks from expert users. 

Sponsored by Alias 

Games & Film animation - Still Worlds 

Apart? 

Chris Kniffen See page 128 for Bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

C4, Convention Center 

Secret Level's latest project, Mac 10 The 
Gathering - Battlegrounds, was a short 10 
month video game production in which over 
50 types of creature and player models were 
rigged onto a smaller selection of skeletons. 
Models of all shapes, sizes and animation 
needs were produced, and were required to be 
ready for an animator within a day or so of 
each other. A variety of techniques were 
developed to speed up the rigging process and 
increase our efficiency exporting to the Unreal 
engine in order to meet these demands. 

Sponsored by Discreet 
Government Simulation in 3ds max 
Brian Blau, Stephen Langmead, 
Mike Rasmussen, Douglas Whatley 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
Friday, March 26 • g-io:i5am 
C3, Convention Center 

This session covers the use of game 
technology for Government Simulation 
(training, mission rehearsal, etc.) and the 
growing number of game companies who are 
successfully leveraging their assets and skills 
for the Government sector. The session is led 
by Mike Rasmussen of NDL who discusses 
how companies like ECC, Engineering and 
Computer Simulation, Vantage Point and 
many others who are using NDL solutions for 
other purposes than creating games. Douglas 
Whatley and Stephen Langmead from 



BreakAway will share their insights in working 
on Government projects. Finally, Bluerock 
Technologies will be demonstrating their new 
OpenFlight editing and import/export plug-in 
for 3ds max. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Hi Res Modeling for Consoles in Maya 
Matt Ontiveros See page 132 for bio 
Friday, March 26 • 2:30-4:3opm 
Salon IV, Marriott 

Using examples from Adrenium's projects, Mat 
will share a variety of tips and tricks of the 
Adrenium art team for creating hi-res static 
meshes in Maya. And on low-res models, he will 
demonstrate workflows for normal mapping. 

Takeaway: Knowledge artist can use to create 
hires characters and generate UV maps for 
low-res characters and how to preview the 
results in R/T. 

Intended Audience: Character Modelers and 
Technical Artists who want to see a modeling 
approach for hi-res and normal mapping. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
HiRes Modeling with 3DS Max 
Speaker TBD 

Friday, March 26 • 9-iiam 
Fi, Convention Center 

This comprehensive two-hour session covers 
advanced techniques for creating high 
resolution characters and objects using 
polygons and surface technologies with 3DS 
Max. Professionals and students alike learn how 
to approach building complex models with an 
eye to creating clean results to facilitate easier 
texturing, rigging, and animation. 

Lecture - All 

Jak's Makeover for JakII: Why the Dramatic 

New Look for a Seouel? 

Bob Rafei See page 134 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 

Salon III, Marriott 

After finishing Jak & Daxter:The Precursor 
Legacy for PS2, Naughty Dog decided to do 
something unorthodox for its highly 
anticipated sequel JakII; change the entire 
look of Jak's universe. In an ever evolving era 
of game development where staff, budgets, 
and production cycles are increasing in size, it 
really makes more sense to put out more of 
the same for such sequels. But in some cases 
"safe" isn't "sound." At the risk of alienating 
established fans of the original series AND 
venturing in new, unfamiliar and inexpe- 



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www.gdconf.com 



VISUAL ARTS TRACK 



rienced directions of game play and art for the staff, the choice was to 
almost start new. 

The lecture follows the evolution of JAK.the cast, and their universe to 
the new look in JakII through an in-depth look at the production designs 
that paved the way for this colossal makeover. 

Takeaway: Understanding choices made in the pre-visualization and 
production periods of an ambitious sequel to a high profile predecessor. 

Intended Audience: Came developers interested in the character action 
genre, artist who translates 2D characters ideas into 3D, and any 
developers seeking to streamline concept ideas into the final product. 

Round-table - Intermediate 

Lead Artists Roundtable 

Seth Spaulding See page 137 for bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:30-6:3opm 

E, Convention Center 

Friday, March 26 • 4-5pm 

L, Convention Center 

The lead artists roundtable seeks to bring issues common to lead artists 
throughout the industry, in both large and small development houses, 
and discuss solutions to them. 

Problems common to the job which raised some great discussions in 
2001 include: 

- How do you schedule unknown project tasks? 

- What makes a good lead and how do you become a better one? 

- Looking at an 18-month project schedule is a daunting task. Where do 
you start? 

- How much pre-production is enough? 

- What are some common pitfalls art faces during a project and how can 
you avoid them better? 

- How do you handle your publishers' art director? 

In 2001, this roundtable produced some facinating debates. This 
roundtable draws from that experience, building on the issues that 
arose. 

Takeaway: The attendees come away from the roundtable with a greater 
set of tools to deal with problems they face in their jobs. Additionally, 
they are prepared for (or at least forewarned of) issues which may 
surface as their projects continue. 

Intended Audience: The ideal participant in this disscussion is a game 
development art manager. This can be a lead artist, art manager, or an 
art director. Art leads who have completed one or more projects can add 
value to the discussion, while new art leads should find the discussions 
and takeaways very valuable. 

Sponsored by Discreet 
MaxScripting for Game Development 
Jason Busby See page 120 for bio 
Friday, March 26 • i-3pm 
C3, Convention Center 

See Addendum for description. 



Lecture - Intermediate 

Maya for Games -Tools & Pipelines in Maya 

Morris Olmsted & Wade Schin See pages 132 & 736 for bios 

Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-4:3opm 

Ft, Convention Center 

Big teams require fast and solid solutions to problems and good tools 
that support asset generation and development pipelines. Maya offers 
great flexibility for quickly generating solutions and integrating tools 
into game production pipelines. 

How to modify some of the Mel scripts at the core of Maya to achieve 
the goal of seamlessly integrating tools into the familiar Maya interface 
will be shown. A brief overview of methods for maintaining a constantly 
evolving asset pipeline, with minimal disruption to established art 
workflows will also be discussed. 

Takeaway: Attendees should leave with a basic understanding of how to 
integrate tools into Maya, including what to look out for while 
modifying core Maya scripts to extend the basic interface. 

Intended Audience: All levels of Maya users, although some basic Mel 
scripting knowledge is a plus. 

Sponsored by Alias 

The Next Level: Visual Real-time Shader Creation 

Frank Delise See page 122 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • 3-4pm 

C4, Convention Center 

Mr. DeLise demonstrates RTzen's first product, RT/shader. RT/shader 
enables artists to visually create real-time hardware shaders. Artists can 
now create real-time shaders just as easily as software shader networks 
without knowing or understanding Cg or HLSL. Workflows will be shown 
for using the Maya connection to RT/shader, or RT/shader as a 
standalone application. 

Takeaway: Knowledge of how artists can now create real-time shaders 
using the Maya connection to RT/shader or RT/shader without any 
knowledge of shader programming languages. 

Intended Audience: Artists and technical artists who want to 
understand how to create hardware shaders 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Outdoor Jungle Vegetation: Battlefield Vietnam 

Riccard Linde See page ngfor bio 

Wednesday, March 24 • 5:306:30pm 

Salon III, Marriott 

When 3d FPS games saw their first light, they introduced an astonishing 
technology, the ability to freely move around in a real life environment. 
That changed the way we played our games. With the limitations of 
computer power, game developers concentrated on complex interior 
structures instead of real world exterior environments. Today we have 
reached a point where the power of the computer enables us to create 
and experience a near realistic world, outside these interior buildings. 

Battlefield Vietnam is doing just this jungle and outdoor vegetation 
through the use of grass, bushes and trees comes to life. This all 
happens in a +32 player online environment. With the updated graphics 
engine 'Ra', a part of the Refractor2 engine. 



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VISUAL ARTS TRACK 



Our goal to create the jungle environment of 
'Hollywood Vietnam' created several 
interesting challenges from a game play and 
artistic perspective. How did we integrate this 
feature, tailor our workflow and solve the 
problems that occurred? 

Takeaway: After the class the attended should 
have an understanding artistically and game 
design wise of the possibilities and pitfalls of 
massive vegetation environment in an online 
multiplayer game. 

Intended Audience: Game artists and 
developers interested in a solution for creating 
dense outdoor environments. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Producing the Characters and Creatures of 

Ultima X Odyssey 

Stefan Henry-Biskup See page 125 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • 4-spm 

Salon III, Marriott 

For the last year and a half Liquid Development 
has been the primary production source of 
Creatures and Characters for Ultima X 
Odyssey coming soon from Origin Systems and 
Electronic Arts. This talk covers the techniques 
and production pipeline developed for this 
project. From initial Concept designs and 
maintaining a tight communications loop with 
the client, through asset production and 
delivery.Thecoreof this talk is actual model 
production. UXO has very specific stylistic look, 
the methods used to maintain a consistent 
adherence to this look while employing 
multiple artist are discussed and shown. 
Construction methods aimed at optimal 
deformation and animation performance of the 
mesh and skeleton are demonstrated. The UV 
layout and Texture painting stages are 
examined. Specifics of the pipeline and how the 
construction sequence impacted overall ability 
to produce models to specification, on time, and 
within budget are discussed as well. With the 
ever rising standards of today's technology, the 
creation of art for video games, especially of 
Characters and Creatures, is a demanding 
mixture of art and craft requiring skill, 
discipline, and careful planning. Come to this 
talk to learn how one group has approached 
this challenge. 

Takeaway: 3D character artists looking tips 
and tricks to produce better models more 
quickly. Producers and art directors interested 
in how outsourcing of art can be implemented 
successfully. 

Intended Audience: Attendees leave with a 
clear picture of how communication, planning 
and implementation of specific techniques 



were successfully employed to create the 
character and creature models of Ultima X 
Odyssey. 

Lecture - All 

Raising the Bar on In-Game Character 

Animation 

Jeremy Cantor See page 120 for bio 

Thursday, March 25 • g-nam 

Salon III, Marriott 

Most video game animation is not exactly 
Earth-shattering, especially when compared to 
what is regularly seen in cut sequences, 
television shows, and feature films. 

While the level of excellence of other in-game 
visual components like modeling, texturing, 
lighting, climate FX, and rendering has consis- 
tently and dramatically improved over the past 
several years, it seems that, in general, character 
animation quality has been left in the dust. 

For many players, the "immersive" experience 
of an otherwise visually compelling game is 
broken when animation problems such as 
single frame rotation pops, foot slides, and 
weightless movements rear their ugly heads. 

Perhaps the biggest issue is the simple fact 
that many of the fundamental principles of 
character animation are in direct conflict with 
the concept of interactivity. 

And the big question is: Can in-game 
animation improve substantially despite the 
necessary technical and budgetary restrictions 
of game production pipelines. 

In this lecture, the presenter focuses on 
solutions rather than mere criticism by: 

- Briefly covering the fundamental principles 
of character animation 

- Tracing the history and milestones of game 
animation 

- Discussing some of the reasons why in-game 
animation is too often less than impressive 

- Proposing a dozen or so concepts and 
techniques that can be implemented to 
bring animation quality to the next level. 

Takeaway: A better understanding of why 
high quality, in-game animation is especially 
difficult to produce. Specific strategies and 
techniques that can be implemented in 
future, character-based games in order to 
improve overall animation quality. 

Intended Audience: Animators benefit most 
from this session. Game designers and 
producers who care about animation quality 
should also attend. The prerequisite are 



familiarity with existing games and a desire to 
raise the current standard for animation 
excellence. 

Sponsored by Discreet 
Realtime Shaders Made Easy 
Frank Delise See page 122 for bio 
Thursday, March 25 • g-io:i5am 
C3, Convention Center 

In this session discreet is hosting RTzen and 
their incredible new shader technology. 
RT/shader enables artists to visually create 
real-time shaders for next generation games, 
producing on the fly source code in HLSL, Cg 
and others. RT/shade works dynamically with 
3ds max, providing real time feedback in the 
3ds max viewport. If you ever wanted to build 
Real-time shaders, using a powerful schematic 
view style interface you must check this out. 
Artists and Programmers will get a lot out of 
this demonstration. 

Sponsored by Discreet 
Storytelling and Animation: Part 1 
Andrew Cordon & Mike Wellins 

See pages 125 & 740 for bios 
Thursday, March 25 • i-3pm 
C3, Convention Center 

Pixar animator Andrew Gordon and prolific 
independent filmmaker Mike Wellins will 
spend two jam-packed sessions exploring, in 
depth, the world of animation from a general 
overview to the current state of animation as 
a career. The class will include minute details 
on creating great animation and dynamic 
filmmaking and editing. Using specific 
examples from films and television, Andrew 
and Mike will discuss animation fundamentals 
and principles, animation directing, the basics 
of performance staging, blocking and story 
telling, editing for emotion, and classic 
character animation. 

Sponsored by Discreet 
Storytelling and Animation: Part 2 
Andrew Gordon & Mike Wellins 

See pages 125 & 140 for bios 
Thursday, March 25 • 4-6pm 
C3, Convention Center 

See Storytelling and Animation: Part 1. 

Sponsored by Discreet 

3DS Max and Criterion: From Console to 

Mobile 

Criterion Representative 

Wednesday, March 24 • g-io:3oam 
C3, Convention Center 



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VISUAL ARTS TRACK 



This session demonstrates how to use 3ds max in combination with the 
RenderWare suite of tools. Highlights include previewing artwork on 
various targets, from current consoles to next generation mobile devices, 
as well as using RenderWare Studio to build a game level. 

Criterion Software is the world-leading provider of middleware solutions 
for the game development industry. RenderWare is Criterion's portfolio 
of game development solutions, which includes RenderWare Platform 
and RenderWare Studio for PlayStation 2, Xbox, NINTENDO GAMECUBE 
and PC. 

Sponsored by Discreet 

3DS Max and Unreal Tournament 2004 

Jason Busby See page 120 for bio 

Friday, March 26 • iO:45am-i2pm 

C3, Convention Center 

See Addendum for description. 

Sponsored by Discreet 
Tips and Tricks for 3DS Max 6 in Games 
Kelcey Privett See page 134 for bio 
Thursday, March 25 • iO:45am-i2pm 
C3, Convention Center 

Learn to harness more of the power of 3ds max in game development. 
Beginners, intermediate and professionals alike are guaranteed to learn 
functions not known about this incredibly flexible tool. 

Lecture - Intermediate 

Tips & Tricks for UV Mapping 

Renier Banninga, Dion Rogers, Lex Story 

See pages 117-141 for bios 
Wednesday, March 24 • g-ioam 
Salon IV, Marriott 

This lecture takes a deeper look into UV mapping for games and CC, and is 
intended to provide those attending with efficient and accurate methods 
in creating UV maps for games and high end CG work. With the ever 
increasing demand on developers to achieve higher levels of detail in there 
games, they have had to resort to using every trick in the book. And with 
this lecture we intend to provide you with a comprehensive look and 
insight into achieve those great levels of texture detail for your games 
while still stay within those nasty memory limits. 

Subjects like, UV mapping with game shaders in mind for achieving more 
advanced visual effects by the use of clever mapping tricks, and discussing 
methods on the creation of clean continuous UV mapping and how to 
keep your textures pixel density consistent with little to no texture 
distortion. 

We also be covering the use of advanced layer systems using smaller 
modular blended textures to achieve greater micro details. For example, 
the tiny scratches on the metal surface of a mech, the woven patterns of 
cloth, and detailed human skin with everything from pores to freckles. 

Takeaway: Attendants of the lecture leave with a greater understanding in 
the use of clever UV mapping, and are armed with more advanced 
methods and concepts helping expand their bag of tricks when next 
tackling a complex model or project. You leave with the knowledge to help 
keep a greater level of detail with less sacrifice in quality while still staying 
within those limited texture memory constrictions. 



Intended Audience: Any 3D artist interested in expanding his knowledge 
of UV mapping should attend this lecture. Some prior knowledge of 
mapping is preferred but not required since the discussion covers many 
methods of UV map creation. If you're just beginning with UV mapping or 
a veteran in the industry, there is something new for everyone to learn. 

Roundtable - All 
Visual Effects Roundtable 
Jez Sherlock 

See page 137 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 4-spm 
L, Convention Center 
Thursday, March 25 • 12-ipm 
E, Convention Center 

A roundtable discussion session open to all those interested in the 
development of visual effects in games. Participants should expect to be 
engaged in lively discussion regarding the visual effects in today's games 
and those we may expect to encounter on future hardware platforms. 

Early discussion focuses on the visual effects in today's most popular titles. 
How have visual effects contributed to these titles? Did it really enhance 
the end user experience, or was it masking other problems? How can we 
promote a better understanding of these visual effects in the game 
development community? 

As each session gets underway the group elaborates on implementation 
techniques, discuss platform specific differences and hardware issues, 
identify and discuss the roles and battles of artists and programmers in 
visual effects development, analyze the tools/technologies that can assist 
visual effects developers and enumerate the reference and research 
resources available to us. 

The roundtable closes with discussion on post conference follow up. 

Takeaway: Participants are expected to benefit from the discussion and 
exchange of ideas and will depart the roundtable session with 
inspiration and a clarified understanding of the role they can play in 
developing visual effects in their organization. 

Expect to take away an understanding of the many effects that are in 
use today, a deeper knowledge of the implementation techniques and 
issues involved in visual effects development and access to a network of 
new resources and contacts with similar interests. 

Intended Audience: This roundtable session is most appealing to artists 
and programmers interested in the techniques and development of 
visual effects. 

Lecture - Intermediate 
Visualizing Sly Cooper 
Dev Madan See page 130 for bio 
Wednesday, March 24 • 2:30-3:3opm 
Salon IV, Marriott 

A look at the visual development behind 2002's Sly Cooper and the 
Thievius Raccoonus for the PlayStation 2. Japan wants him cute, Europe 
wants him edgy and America needs him to look cool. This talk takes a 
look at the evolution of Sly Cooper's character design process, the 
aesthetic behind the environments around Sly and the bosses he 
interacts with. Additionally, a look at the art pipeline, a breakdown of 
the techniques used to convey theintegrated storyline as well as 
character development in the game is covered. 



SPEAKER BIOS 



Rod Abernethy 

Rod Abernethy is the founder and creative director of Rednote 
Audio, a premiere source for music and sound design that pro- 
vides award-winning audio for major corporations worldwide 
including Vivendi Universal, Walt Disney Pictures, Warner 
Bros,, tucasfilm. Paramount Studios, Electronic Arts, Sierra 
Entertainment, and Nintendo. Rod has a degree in music and 
composition from the University of North Carolina/Chapel 
Hill, NC, and spent many years in the record industry record 
ing and collaborating with many well known producers, 
including the legendary Paul Rothchild (the Doors, Jams Joplin, 
Bonnie Raitt) and David Lord (Peter Gabriel, XTQ. He has 
worked in many major studios around the world, and has 
recorded for Warner Bros., Atlantic, Elecktra and MCA records. 
His current work on video game audio led him to collaborate 
with veteran film composer Elmer Bernstein on the score for 
the video game Wild Wild West for Warner Bros. Rod is also 
an advisory board member of The Game Audio Network Guild 
(G.A.N.G.), a non-profit organization that promotes excellence 
in interactive audio. Other game credits include Atlantis, The 
Lost Continent for Disney, The Hobbit for Vivendi 
Universal/Sierra and The Sims BusTiN'Ourfor Maxis/EA. 
Panel: The Hobbit: A Case Study See page 44 

Michael Abrash 

Michael Abrash has been writing about, lecturing on, and 
actually doing performance programming for longer than he 
cares to think about -more than 20 years now. His program- 
ming history includes Windows NT, Quake, and the XBox; he is 
the author of Zen of Assembly Language and Michael Abrash's 
Graphics Programming Black Book; and he has written per- 
formance and graphics columns for Dr. Dobb's, PC Techniques, 
and Programmer's Journal. He is currently working on next- 
generation performance libraries at RAD Game Tools in 
Kirkland, Washington Sponsored Session: Optimizing 
Pixomatic for Modern Processors See page 102 

Dave Adams 

Dave Adams is a successful composer and sound designer at 
Rednote Audio, a premiere source for music and sound design 
that provides award-winning audio for major corporations 
worldwide including Vivendi Universal, Walt Disney Pictures, 
Warner Bros., Lucasfilm, Paramount Studios, Electronic Arts, 
Sierra Entertainment, and Nintendo. Getting his start in pop 
music in the 8o's, Dave traveled the U.S. playing clubs and 
concerts for the band "Glassmoon," recording their first album 
for Atlantic Records "Growing In The Dark" and landing a top 
forty radio hit with a Hollies remake, "On A Carousel". He then 
traveled to the U.K. to record an album for MCA with leg- 
endary producer David Lord (Peter Gabriel, XTC, Tears For 
Fears). Moving to London, Dave worked as a freelance produc- 
er, engineer and session musician in top London studios such 
as Sam West, Air London, Westside and The Townhouse He 
returned to the states in 1994 to join Rednote Audio and con- 
tinue his career in game audio, broadcast music and sound 
design Dave's game credits include Wild Wild West for 
Warner Bros., Atlantis, The Lost Continent for Disney, The 
Hobbit for Vivendi Universal/Sierra and The Sims Bustin'Out 
for Maxis/EA Panel: The Hobbit: A Case Study See page 44 

Ernest W. Adams 

Ernest Adams is a freelance game designer currently based in 
England, and a member of the International Hobo game 
design consortium. He was most recently a lead designer at 
Bullfrog, and several years before that he was the a/v produc- 
er on the Madden NFL Football product line. He has devel- 
oped online, computer, and console games for everything 
from IBM mainframes to the PS2. He was an IGDA founder, 
and is a frequent GDC lecturer. Tutorial: Serious Games 
Summit See page 31. Lecture: The Philosophical Roots of 
Computer Came Design See page 67 

Jay Ag'uilar 

Lecture: Developing Wireless Location-Based Games See page 

97 

Neil Alphonso 

Neil Alphonso of Zombie Studios is a level designer on 
Shadow Ops: Red Mercury at Zombie Studios in Seattle He 
has a B.S. in Radio-TV-Film from the University of Texas, and 
came into the game industry professionally after working in 
film/television. His previous experience also includes level 
design on Tom Clancy's: Splinter Cell. Panel: State of the Art: 
Anatomy of 3D Level Design See page 69 

Eiji Aonuma 

Eiji Aonuma of Nintendo Co., Ltd. is a 16-year veteran of 
Nintendo Co., Ltd. He has spent much of his time working 



alongside legendary video game designer Shigeru Miyamoto. 
Most recently, Eiji was director of the critically acclaimed The 
Legend of Zelda:The Wind Wake r for Nintendo Gamecube. A 
Japan native, Eiji joined Nintendo in 1988, Eiji's past work 
includes the Nintendo 64 console system games The Legend 
of Zelda: Majora's Mask as well as the The Legend of Zelda: 
Ocarina of Time, which has been called "Game of the 
Century" and sold more than seven million units. Eiji holds a 
master's degree in Composition and Design from the Design 
Department/Faculty of Fine Arts at the Tokyo National 
University of Fine Arts and Music. Lecture: The Evolution of a 
Franchise: The Legend of Zelda See page 63 

E. Daniel Arey 

E. Daniel Arey combined his background in communications 
with a deep passion for computer technology, and has worked 
on a number of projects for Electronic Arts, Accolade, and Sega 
of America for the PC, Amiga, Atari St, and Sega Genesis plat 
forms. In 1992 he joined Crystal Dynamics and worked on the 
launch title Crash 'N Burn, and then Total Eclipse, Blood 
Omen: Legacy of Kain, Blazing Dragons, and Gex 3D0. He 
co-designed Gex 2: Enter The Gecko for the Sony Playstation. 
In 1997 he joined Naughty Dog, Inc. where he helped complete 
Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back, and then went on 
to co-design Crash 3: Warped in 1998. Crash Team Racing in 
1999. then Jak and Daxter:The Precursor Legacy in 2001, 
and finally the sequel Jak II in 2003 for the PlayStation 2. 
Lecture: From Script to Joystick: World-Building 101 See page 
63 

Okan Arikan 

Okan Arikan finished his bachelors degree on Computer 
Engineering and Information Science at University of Bilkent, 
Turkey, in 1999. Okan completed his masters thesis on 
"Scalable Simulation" in 2001. In this work, he focused on 
cheap proxy simulators for the objects that are not visible to 
the user. He is currently in the PhD. program of University of 
California, Berkeley, and his current research interests include 
representation and synthesis of motion and global illumina- 
tion rendering Lecture: Motion Synthesis See page 102 

Marc Aubanel 

Marc Aubanel of Electronic Arts has made a career change 
from television production to game production more than 10 
years ago. Marc has been at Electronic Arts Canada from 
when its staff was 60 people to today when there are over 
1200 people in its beautiful Vancouver office. Marc spent most 
of his tenure on FIFA as an assistant producer and worked his 
way to executive producer. Marc have worked on every con- 
ceivable platform since the SEGA Genesis Recently, he worked 
on Def Jam Vendetta, Need for Speed Underground & NHL 
2004 and is currently working on a new game for EA Lecture: 
Using External Contractors Effectively See page 88 

Kevin Bachus 

Kevin Bachus, until recently, was vice president of publishing 
and a founding partner of Capital Entertainment Group (CEG). 
the computer and video game industry's first independent 
production company CEG sought to maximize the potential 
of top-tier developers by managing the development of inno- 
vative, premium quality games in partnership with the world- 
wide publishing community and Kevin was responsible for the 
commercial aspects of product development, including busi- 
ness development, relationship management, and marketing. 
Prior to launching CEG, Kevin was one of the original group of 
four individuals at Microsoft Corporation who came up with 
the idea for the Xbox video game console, an initiative that 
grew in part out of his role as group product manager for 
DirectX. Kevin also served as the company's first director of 
third-party relations for Xbox. Before joining Microsoft, Kevin 
worked for the consumer software publisher Mindscape, Inc. 
in a variety of business and production roles. Although he 
developed a number of games on his own during the early 
'80s, Kevin originally spurned a life dedicated to technology 
and opted to attend the University of Southern California 
School of Cinema-Television where he majored in screenwnt- 
ing and directing before combining his two passions, technol- 
ogy and entertainment, in the interactive entertainment 
industry Lecture: Storytellers vs. Puzzle-Makers: New Traits of 
Successful Games See page 57 

Nelson Bae 

Nelson Bae co-founded the music supervision company 
Sonicfusion in 1999. Nelson has licensed music for more than 
thirty game titles including the Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 
series (best in-game music, Rolling Stone 2002), Mat 
Hoffman's Pro BMX (best licensed music, Gamespot 2000), 



Dead or Alive 3, and, most recently, the WWE wrestling titles. 
He has licensed a broad range of in-game music from rock 
artists such as Rage Against The Machine, Pearl Jam, 
Aerosmith, The Ramones, Red Hot Chili Peppers, and Fugazi to 
hip hop artists such as the OutKast, Method Man/Redman, 
DMX, Gang Starr, Jurassic 5, and Public Enemy. In addition to 
licensing of songs, Nelson has served as a link between the 
gaming and music worlds, incorporating in-game characters, 
cross promotional marketing, bonus in-game features and 
ringtones for wireless gaming Panel: Music Licensing for 
Videogames: How Popular Music and Artists Can Make 
Games Pop See page 54 

Clint Bajakian 

Clint Bajakian is a composer, sound designer and audio pro- 
ducer with 13 years game industry experience. Clint is co- 
owner of The Bay Area Sound Department with Julian 
Kwasneski, providing original music, sound design, and 
voiceover production services, with an emphasis on interac- 
tive media. Prior to The Sound Department, Clint was a com- 
poser and sound design supervisor at LucasArts 
Entertainment. His score for Outlaws won an Outstanding 
Achievement Award from CGW in 1996. His score for Escape 
from Monkey Island was a finalist in the Academy of 
Interactive Arts and Sciences 2001 music category, and his 
orchestral score for Indiana Jones and the Infernal Machine 
was nominated in 1999 for the same award. Last year Clint 
completed the live orchestral score for Indiana Jones and The 
Emperor's Tomb. Clint is vice-president of GANG. (Game 
Audio Network Guild). Panel: Sound Design: Strategies for 
Success See page 46 

Daniel Baker 

Dan Baker of Microsoft has worked on Direct3Dfor more than 
three years and has given multiple presentations on Real-Time 
shading at GDC and Meltdown. Dan had a signifigant role in 
the development of HLSL and is currently continuing develop- 
ment of real-time shading systems Lecture: Advanced Real- 
Time Reflectance See page 92, Sponsored Session: Microsoft 
DirectX High-Level Shader Language Workshop See page icn 

Michael Conway Baker 

Michael Conway Baker of Evocation Publishing/The Pacific 
Philharmonic is considered to be a leading composer in many 
different fields. He has won a number of major awards in 
each, including 3 Genies (Canadian Academy Awards). More 
than 180 film, television, and video music scores owe much of 
their distinctive and award-winning success to his extensive 
background in writing symphonic concert music Michael also 
has over 130 concert works to his credit and has received the 
JUNO award for Best Classical Composition, with his Piano 
Concerto. Michael has been honored to receive the Order of 
British Columbia, and in 2002 received the Queen's Golden 
Jubilee medal Lecture: The Orchestral Music Score for Games: 
Union Versus Non-Union Costs See page 46 

Kavita Bala 

Kavita Bala is an assistant professor at the Computer Science 
Department and the Program of Computer Graphics at 
Cornell University. Before becoming a faculty member, she 
received her doctorate degree from MIT (Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology). She recently co-authored Advanced 
Global Illumination, published by A.K. Peters. Her research 
interests include interactive high-quality rendering, high-qual- 
ity shadows, 4D radiance representations, global illumination 
algorithms, and image-based rendering and texturing. She 
has published several papers in these areas in venues such as 
SIGGRAPH. Interactive 3D Graphics. Transactions on Graphics, 
and the European Workshop on Rendering, among others. 
Lecture: Reusing Shading for Interactive Global Illumination 
See page 105 

Rick Baltman 

Rick Baltman received a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in 
Aerospace Engineering from the University of Toronto and a 
Master of Science degree in Aeronautics/Astronautics from 
Stanford University. Rick graduated in 1993 and got a job at 
Orbital Sciences Corporation in Reston, Virginia, developing 
Attitude Control Systems for the Orbcomm constellation of 
satellites and unmanned reconnaissance aircraft. After four 
years at Orbital, Rick started a business to develop 
Reelmotion.a physics based animation program that has 
been used in TV commercials, feature films, and accident 
reconstructions. Rick then became co-owner of Check Six 
Studios and obtained a contract with Alias Wavefront to 
develop the Maya Real-Time SDK. In 1999, Rick joined Rainbow 
Studios, where he has programmed the physics for all of 



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SPEAKER BIOS 



Rainbow's console games, including the hits ATV Offroad Fury and ATV Offroad Fury 2. 
Lecture: Using Verlet Integration and Constraints in a Six Degree of Freedom Rigid Body Physics 
Simulation See page 108 

Renier Banninga 

Renier J. Banninga is one of the founding members of Streamline Studios and currently serves as 
the technical art director, Renier's responsibilities include designing and managing all technical 
art requirements for the studio. Renier has over five years experience as a 3D/CGI artist and has 
refined his abilities as modeler, texture artist, and 26 artists on numerous projects. Prior to 
founding Streamline Studios, he served as the lead artist on Sierra's The Gunmen Chronicles, 
where he was responsible for managing and modeling over 95% of the game's total mesh con- 
tent. Since Streamlines Studios' inception, he has worked on various projects which include the 
PC cinematics for EA's James Bond: 007 Nightfire and Atari's Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas 
Most recently he worked on the new intro cinematic for Atari and Human Head Software's 
upcoming Dead Man's Hand Panel: Tips & Tricks for UV Mapping See page 116 

Jonty Barnes 

Jonty Barnes is currently head of Black & White Studios. Jonty has worked on seven published 
titles. Notable achievements include the Al programming in Dungeon Keeper, the Gesture 
System in Black & White, and leading the team responsible for the implementation of the 
Scripting Language and Story in Black & White. A graduate in computer systems engineering, he 
enjoys reading, and also enjoys writing; he is a contributing author to the industry book Al Came 
Programming Wisdom published by Charles River Media, 2002. Lecture: Ah Cameplay & Design: A 
Marriage of Heaven or Hell? See page 93 

Luis Barriga 

tuis Barriga has worked as a game designer at Vicarious Visions for three years, where he has 
designed several high-profile titles for the Game Boy Advance including Crash Bandicoot: The 
Huge Adventure and Spider-Man: Mysterio's Menace. Before that Luis interned at Microsoft, 
where he worked as a software test engineer on titles like Age of Empires and Urban Assault. 
Lecture: Anatomy of a 2D Side-Scroller See page 60 

John Bartkiw 

John Bartki of Microsoft Game Studio received B.S. in computer science from the University of 
Western Ontario in London, Ontario. He started at Microsoft working on developer tools before 
moving to games. Favorite games of all time are Ms. Pacman and NHL '95 Tutorial: (342) Test 
Automation in Game Development See page SS 

Hal Barwood 

See page 12 for bio Lecture: Entering the World: Cognitive Dissonance and Immersion in 
Electronic Games See page 62 

Chris Bateman 

Chris Bateman is managing director of game design and narrative consultancy at International 
Hobo, founded in 1999. Chris has been working in game design for more than a decade, original- 
ly with tabletop role playing games, and later coming to work in computer entertainment after 
completing a Master's degree in Artificial Intelligence. Chris is one of the co-ordinators of the 
North West UK chapter of the IGDA, and sits on the executive panel of the Game Writers' special 
interest group. His second novel Dreamtime was published in late 2003, and his most recently 
published game project is Ghost Master Group Gathering: Writers' Group Gathering See page 



Bob Bates 

Bob Bates began his game writing career at Infocom in 1986. Since then he has written, co- 
designed, produced, or otherwise assisted the development of more than 25 games that have 
won over 40 industry awards, most notably the 1993 Adventure Game of the Year award, for Eric 
The Unready, and most recently Unreal II: The Awakening. In 1989 he co-founded Legend 
Entertainment, where he is still an active designer and Studio Head. He is a frequent speaker at 
industry conferences and events, and he is also the co-founder of the Game Designers Workshop, 
an annual conference of storytelling game designers. Bob is also the author of the industry's 
bestselling book on game development, entitled Came Design: The Art and Business of Creating 
Games, which is used as a textbook by several colleges and universities, and he is the editor of 
the Came Developers Market Cuide, published by Premier Press. Roundtable: Storytelling in 
Games See page 69 

Scott Bedard 

Scott Bedard, as director of technology, oversees the technology operations for all GameSpot 
divisions and brands. Scott's key responsibilities involve the management of GameSpot 's data 
group, including the day-to-day operations of the Game Rankings Web site, as well as technolog- 
ical innovation across all properties. In 1999, Scott founded the Game Rankings Web site, the 
world's most comprehensive database of gaming editorial coverage, where he co-created 
GameSpot Trax. Game Rankings was acquired by GameSpot 's parent company, CNET Networks, 
in 2003. Prior to Game Rankings. Scott held several senior software engineering positions in the 
automotive, real estate and telecommunications industries, where he developed large client- 
server applications Sponsored Session: GameSpot Trax: Get the Buzz on Your Game (Before Your 
Competitors Do) See pages' 

Ellen Beeman 

Ellen Beeman has spent more than a dozen years in designing, writing, and producing computer 
games, both as a freelancer and a salaried employee. She began her career as a project manager 
at Sierra Online. She joined Origin to write, design, and direct games in the Wing Commander 
series. After Origin, she joined Electronic Arts as an associate producer, managing external devel- 
opment projects. As a freelance game designer and producer, she worked with Microsoft, Disney, 
Leapfrog, Sega, Imagination Network, Compton's New Media, and numerous other clients. She is 
now a game producer with Monolith Productions, working with The Matrix Online Live team. 
Prior to her game development career, Ellen was a children's television screenwriter, and has 



published four novels and many short stories. Ellen is also well-known for her articles about the 
game development industry Roundtable: Long-Term Career Strategies: Advancing to the Next 
Level See page 77 

Matthew Bellows 

Matthew Bellows has worked in telecom and the Internet since 1995. Before co-founding 
Wireless Gaming Review, Matthew was director of business development for Engage. At Engage, 
Matthew managed the team responsible for 4,000 advertising contracts that drove $30 million 
in annual revenue. Before entering the Internet advertising world, Matthew was vice president 
of sales and marketing at Interstep, a leading email services firm. Matthew received his MBA 
with high honors from the Olin School of Management at Babson College. Panel: Great Games in 
50k: Three Addictive Mobile Phone Titles See page 6$ 

Seth Berg 

Seth Berg is the vice president of EMI Film & TV Music and is responsible for placing recorded 
music in Commercials, Video Games, TV Shows, and Films. He works with an artist roster that 
goes back 60 years and includes such stars as Frank Sinatra, The Beatles, Tina Turner, Norah 
Jones, Pink Floyd and Coldplay. Seth represents labels such as Capitol Records, Virgin Records, Blue 
Note Records, EMI Classics, Astrelwerks, and Real World World Records, to name but a few. Panel: 
Music Licensing for Videogames: How Popular Music and Artists Can Make Games Pop See page 
54 

Erik Bethke 

Erik Bethke has been developing games for the last eight years. During this time he has worked 
up the ranks from a junior engineering position to the owner and CEO of Taldren. At Taldren, he 
is responsible for overall project development, leading design, and new business development. 
Projects hemanaged at Taldren include the Starfleet Command real-time tactical starship simu- 
lator. He has acted as the lead designer and producer/executive producer throughout such series 
as SFC l.SFC: Neutral Zone, SFC II: Empires at War. SFC: Orion Pirates, and Starfleet Command 
3. Prior to founding Taldren Inc., Erik has worked for both large publishers and small developers 
of the game. Projects included I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream for Cyberdreams, 
PlanetNET for MPGNet, and Caesars Palace Windows 95 for Interplay Panel: Starting a New 
Studio See page 56 

Lars Bishop 

Lars M. Bishop is the chief technology officer at Numerical Design Limited, where he has worked 
on the Gamebryo and Netlmmerse3D game engines. Lars served as a lead developer for PC- 
based low level rendering technologies and then chief architect prior to his current position. For 
the past three years, he has also specialized in handheld 3D rendering technologies, specializing 
in 3D engine design and optimizations for small platforms. At GDC, he co-presented the Essential 
Math for 3D Games talk with Jim Van Verth in 2003. He is also the co-author of a book to be pub- 
lished by Morgan Kaufman in 2004. Lars received a B.S. in mathematics and computer science 
from Brown University (1994) and an M.S. in computer science from the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill (1996) Tutorial: (338) Essential Math for Game Programmers See page 33 

Matteo Bittanti 

Matteo Bittanti of European Institute of Design, Milan, is a game researcher/journalist currently 
based in Milan, Italy. His academic research focuses on the cultural, social, and theoretical 
aspects of emerging technology, with an emphasis on the interrelations of popular culture, visu- 
al culture, and the arts. Primary interest is the social and cultural impact of video games. He has 
published a few books on gaming and is the editor of Ludologica (www.ludologica.com), a series 
of critical monographs on seminal videogames available from one of Italy's leading academic 
publishers, Edizioni Unicopli. He also writes about games for the Italian version of EDGE maga- 
zine, PC Gamer, and Xbox Official Magazine Group Gathering: Academics' Group Gathering See 
page 73; Lecture: Make Better Criticism: A Mature Form of Cultural Analysis See page 77 

Kevin Bjorke 

Kevin Bjorke moved from live-action to animation and has had a long history in films, games, TV, 
and all other sorts of computer- rendered venues, including the films Toy Story, A Bug's Life, and 
recently Final Fantasy, where he developed and variously supervised the camera, lighting, and 
shading teams. He is now developing next generation shading methods in the developer rela- 
tions group at Nvidia. He attended the California Institute of the Arts and Stapleton Elementary 
School in Framingham, Massachusetts. Sponsored Session: Cinematic Effects II: The Revenge See 
page 95; Sponsored Session: GPU Gems Showcase See page gg 

Jim Blackhurst 

Jim Blackhurst is co-founder and creative director of Hailstorm, an independent mobile games 
studio based in Banbury, North Oxfordshire. Hailstorm has developed mobile games for many 
different platforms, including J2ME, WAP, HDML, and SMS as well as providing two launch titles 
for the European iMode implementation. Hailstorm has achieved commercial success in many 
territories, most notably in North America, where every major network operator in the U.S. and 
Canada carries its games through a distribution deal with its partner, Airborne Entertainment. 
Hailstorm also works with Mobile Scope AG, Cash-U and TTPcom in Europe, and will be announc- 
ing partnerships for J2ME content shortly. Jim has more than six years experience developing 
and deploying interactive content, and a B.S. Hons in Creative and Scientific Visualisation from 
the University of Teesside Roundtable: Less is More? Design for Mobile Games See page 66 




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SPEAKER BIOS 



Brian Blau 

Sponsored Session: Government Simulation in 3ds max See 

page 113 

Jonathan Blow 

Jonathan Blow writes the technical column for Game 
Developer magazine, The Inner Product Lecture: Experimental 
Gameplay Workshop See page 63 

Keith Boesky 

Keith Boesky formed the videogame department within 
International Creative Management in November 2002. The 
department translates games to film, brings film and televi- 
sion talent to games, and assists studios in maximizing the 
value of their intellectual property. From 1998 to 2002, Keith 
was the principal of Boesky & Company Clients included 
Universal Studios, Paramount Studios, Squaresoft, The Upper 
Deck Company, Apple Computer, and Thomas Weisel Partners. 
In 1996, Keith joined Eidos as President. While at Eidos Keith 
expanded Eidos properties, including Tomb Raider and Lara 
Croft, into film, toys, and publishing and acquired new prop- 
erties, such as Final Fantasy VII PC and Fear Effect. From 1992 
to 1996 Keith was an attorney with Cooley Codward. Panel: 
Interfacing With Hollywood: Challenges and Opportunties See 
page S3 

Jennifer Boespflug 

Jennifer Boespflug started working with both Microsoft and 
online games six years ago in 1998 with the online ratings 
system at The Internet Gaming Zone. Since then, she has 
worked on other Internet gaming projects such As Bridge 2.0, 
Kasparov vs. the World, Trivia, Windows Millennium Internet 
Games and Windows XP Internet Games. In 2001 she moved 
to Xbox projects and worked on the last couple of months of 
Nightcaster. In 2002 she worked on Tim Shafer's Psychonauts 
and was the test lead for Xbox version of Shenmue 2. In 2003, 
she became the automation test lead for the Role-Playing, 
Adventure Technology department at Microsoft Game 
Studios. Currently, Jennifer is a test lead in the Microsoft 
Game Studios SDET team, coordinating automation efforts for 
the RPG single player, MMORPG, and RARE departments. 
Tutorial: (342) Test Automation in Game Development See 
page 35, Lecture: Automation Recipes: Automation Ideas to 
Save Project Time and Money See page 82 

Sue Bohle 

Sue Bohle, of the Bohle Company, has more than 30 years' 
public relations experience, 20 in the game industry. Sue has 
spoken at regional and national Public Relations Society of 
America conferences and has lectured at numerous universi- 
ties on public relations strategy and crisis communications 
topics. She is the former chair of both the Counselors 
Academy and the College of Fellows, an elite group of only 30 
senior PR counselors selected for their contribution to the pro- 
fession. Sue spoke about game public relations at GDC 2002 
in San Jose Lecture: How to Get More Coverage for Your 
Company and Titles See page 52 

Scott Bonds 

Scott Bonds is a seasoned business software producer who 
has led the development of products for companies like 
Microsoft and Siemens, managing teams of internal program- 
mers, external programmers, clients, parent contractors, and 
all the other contributors and stakeholders in complicated 
projects. His efforts have illuminated a lot of issues that game 
production shares with other software production endeavors, 
and a number specific to games Panel: IGDA Quality of Life 
White Paper Unveiling See page 76 

Jason Booth 

Jason Booth is currently employed as creative director at 
Turbine Entertainment, and received his formal training at the 
Berklee College of Music. While his presentation at this year's 
GDC is on music systems, he's equally comfortable working on 
game design, tools design, or creating game art in Maya. 
When not at work, Jason can usually be found at various con- 
certs and festivals Roundtable: Designing an Interactive 
Music System See page 43 

Michael Booth 

Michael Booth, of Turtle Rock Studios, has more than 15 years 
of professional software engineering experience, including 
eight years of experience in the videogame industry, and 
seven years experience in the real-time simulation industry. 
His gaming credentials include providing technical direction 
for Command & Conquer: Generals and Red Alert IF Yuri's 
Revenge, published by Westwood Studios/Electronic Arts, as 



well as the creation of Nox and Nox Quest, also published by 
Westwood/EA. Turtle Rock Studios' current projects include 
Counter-Strike: Condition Zero and the Official Counter- 
Strike Bot, showcasing advanced and very believable human- 
like artificial intelligence. Michael has a B.S. in Mechanical 
Engineering from the University of Iowa Lecture: The Making 
of the Official Counter-Strike Bot See page 101 

John Borland 

John Borland covers digital entertainment, intellectual proper- 
ty, content security, and related issues for cnet.com. He recent- 
ly co-authored a book on the culture and history of computer 
games called Dungeons & Dreamers: The Rise of Computer 
Gaming Culture from Geek to Chic. Before working at cnet, 
John wrote about technology policy for CMP Media's Techweb 
and covered campaigns and politics for California Journal 
Magazine. He has won several industry prizes including the 
National Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi 
Award. The last game he played through was Ubisoft's 
Beyond Good and Evil Sponsored Session: The Security 
Bottom Line See page 106 

Andrew Boyd 

Andrew Boyd is audio director at Stormfront Studios. He has 
been creating game audio professionally for ten years, and 
has shipped 30 products across almost every genre and plat 
form. He is a frequent contributor to Game Developer maga- 
zine, and is a member of GANG, AIAS, and IGDA. As audio 
director, Andrew oversees all aspects of the audio in 
Stormfront's games, from initial design and system specifica- 
tion to the management of the in-house team of sound 
designers and composers. Andrew has worked with every ele- 
ment in game audio, from recording voice to composing 
music, from field recording to implementation, from design to 
post production. Andrew owned and operated Audible 
Images, producing music, sound, and voice for games and new 
media. His clients included Apple Computer. Electric Planet, 
Network Live!, SportsMogul, and Vertical Online Lecture: 
Audio Director to the Rescue See page 42 

Jeff Brabec 

Jeff Brabec an entertainment law attorney and former record- 
ing artist, is vice president of Business Affairs for the Chrysalis 
Music Group. He has negotiated over 1,000 movie, television, 
video and commercial agreements and hundreds of publish 
ing agreements for chart writers and writer/recording artists. 
Jeff is the co-author with his brother Todd of the book Music. 
Money and Success: The Insider's Guide to Making Money in the 
Music Business (Schirmer Trade Books/Music Sales) and has 
been awarded the ASCAP Deems Taylor Award for excellence 
in music journalism. Jeff is an adjunct professor at USC 
Thornton School of Music/Business Division and contributing 
editor to the Entertainment Law & Finance Magazine. He has 
written numerous articles on the music industry which have 
appeared in the NARAS Journal. New York Law Journal. 
Advertising Age, Hollywood Reporter. Entertainment. Publishing 
and The Arts Handbook, Entertainment Law & Finance 
Magazine, the Entertainment Law Reporter and the 
International Association of Entertainment Lawyers Music 
Handbook Panel: Music Publishing: A Primer for Game 
Developers and Composers See page 54 

Todd Brabec 

Todd Brabec, executive vice president and director of 
Membership for the American Society of Composers, Authors 
and Publishers (ASCAP), is in charge of all of the society's 
membership operations throughout the world (175,000 writer 
and publisher members and 8 offices). A former entertain- 
ment law attorney, recording artist, and graduate of the New 
York University School of Law, he is a winner of the Deems 
Taylor Award for excellence in music journalism with more 
than 100 published articles, is co-author of the best selling 
book Music. Money and Success. The Insider's Guide to Making 
Money in the Music Business (Schirmer Trade Books/Music 
Sales) and is an adjunct professor at the USC Thornton School 
of Music/Music Industry Department where he teaches the 
business of music publishing Visit 

www.musicandmoney.com. Panel: Music Publishing: A Primer 
for Game Developers and Composers See page 54 

David Braben 

David Braben and Frontier Developments Ltd. have had a rep- 
utation for producing unusual and innovative computer 
games since 1982 and are well known for pioneering many 
technological and gameplay firsts and establishing new game 
styles that many have since copied. David is particularly well- 
known for co-writing the seminal game Elite, the first true 3D 



game. Following Elite, Zarch (and later Virus) also achieved 
many firsts: first to have real-time shadows and lighting, for 
example, which were used to depict a cheese-shaped craft fly- 
ing over a solid 3D landscape. Many may also remember 
Frontier, the sequel to Elite, which was the best-selling game 
in Europe in 1993. Frontier came on a single floppy, and yet 
included a simulation of our entire galaxy, right down to the 
Earth and our solar system Lecture: Wallace and Gromit in 
Project Zoo: A Postmortem of a Licensed, Cross-Platform 
Game See page 88 

Paul Bragiel 

Paul Bragiel founded and has served as the chief executive 
officer behind Paragon Five since its inception in late 1999. 
Previously, Paul served in a leading role dealing with mergers 
and acquisitions at Arthur Andersen. Prior to founding 
Paragon Five, Paul was actively involved in the demo scene 
and till this day can be found to participate occasionally. Paul 
received a B.S. in Computer Engineering from the University of 
Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Group Gathering: Demo Sceners' 
Group Gathering See page 74 

Alex Brandon 

Alexander Brandon has been writing music and creating 
sound effects for games since 1995, having worked on more 
than a dozen high profile titles with such companies as Epic 
Games, Legend Entertainment, and Ion Storm. He is currently 
the audio director of Deus Ex 2 at Ion Storm. He is also the 
membership director for the Game Audio Network Guild and 
is on the DirectX Audio Advisory Board. He has written articles 
for Gamasutra and Game Developer magazine as well as start- 
ed The Interactive Audio Journal found at the Interactive Audio 
Special Interest Group's website, www.iasig.org. Lecture: The 
Interface: How to Create an Effective Audio Schedule See page 



Peter Brinson 

Panel: ArtModJam See page 60 

Glenn Broadway 

Glenn Broadway has worked in computer game development 
for more than ten years. Glenn's career as a videogame artist 
includes the role of lead artist & designer on the PC Format 
Shoot-Em-Up 1996, SWIV 3D. As one of the co-founders of 
IOMO, Glenn has been creating mobile content since the plat- 
form first appeared. In his role as designer he has worked on 
more than 35 Java, WAP, and SMS games. IOMO are well 
known for being one of the most prolific developers of quality 
wireless games in the world Roundtable: The Medium 
Maketh The Game: How Must Developers Adapt their 
Techniques for Constrained Platforms? See page 66 

Bill Brown 

Bill Brown's innovative and powerful scores for Tom Clancy's 
Rainbow Six series, Ghost Recon series. Lineage II: The 
Chaotic Chronicles, Command & Conquer: Generals, The 
Sum of All Fears-PC, Return to Castle Wolfenstein, Clive 
Barker's Undying, Windows XP music and system sounds 
and feature film titles such as Oliver Stone's film Any Given 
Sunday and Alt, directed by Michael Mann, have gained special 
recognition in the industry. Bill is director of music for the 
award winning music and sound design team at Soundelux 
Design Music Group. Hollywood California, and has worked 
with top directors and producers including Steven Spielberg, 
Michael Crichton, Oliver Stone, Clive Barker. Tom Clancy, Gus 
Van Sant, and more. Panel: The Virtual and Mixed Media 
Orchestra for Game Music See page 47 

Mark Burdick 

Mark "Redbird" Burdick is a member of the User Testing Group 
at Microsoft Game Studios. In addition, he manages other 
processes and employees involved in user-based data collec- 
tion. Mark has a Master's degree in Cognitive Psychology from 
the University of Illinois and previously worked at NASA-Ames 
research center on re-designing the cockpit instrumentation 
in the Space Shuttle to be more user-friendly. He has also 
worked as a usability engineer on wireless software applica- 
tions and hardware. The User-testing Group at Microsoft 
Game Studios uses psychological research methods to collect 
feedback that improves the fun and ease of use of games 
published by Microsoft. Since 1998, the group has tested 
30,000+ gamers, playing more than 175 different games 
(Microsoft and competitors), on PC and all major console plat 
forms (Xbox. PSi & PS2, Gamecube & N64, and Dreamcast). 
Tutorial: (359) Do-it-Yourself Usability: A Crash Course on 
User-Testing See page 34 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



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www.gdconf.com 




SPEAKER BIOS 



Jonathan Burns 

Jonathan Burns of Microsoft Came Studios graduated from the University of Washington in 2001 
with a Bachelor of Science degree in computer engineering. He was hired after graduation into 
Microsoft Game Studios where he has been to date. He has worked on several pc and Xbox titles, 
including the Bicycle Board/Card/Casino games. Kunc Fu Chaos, and most recently 
Counterstrike. Since coming to MCS, Jon has focused primarily on automated testing solutions 
for the gaming industry Tutorial: (342) Test Automation in Came Development See page 35, 
Roundtable. Lua in the Gaming Industry See page 100 

Buzz Burrowes 

See page 18 for bio Panel: Mixing and Mastering Music and Sound for Games See page 45 

Jason Busby 

Sponsored Session: 3ds max and Unreal Tournament 2004 See page 116, Sponsored Session: 

MaxScripting for Game Development See page 114 

Tom Buscaglia 

Tom Buscaglia of T.H. Buscaglia & Associates is an attorney practicing technology law in Miami, 
Florida. In addition to obtaining his Law degree with honors from Georgetown University in 1985, 
Tom holds a B.A. in Philosophy from S.U.N.Y., Buffalo, with honors in Phenomenology and the 
Philosophy of Law. Tom is a principal in the law firm T.H. Buscaglia and Associates in Miami, 
Florida. Dedicated to the computer and videogames industry, Tom has been representing game 
developers in all aspects of their legal and business needs since 1991. Tom's firm's web site is 
www.gameattorney.com. He was the Keynote Luncheon Speaker at the 2003 Summer Simulation 
Multiconference in Montreal, Canada, sponsored by the Society for Modeling and Simulation, 
speaking on The Came and Simulation Industries. Convergence or Collision Panel: The 
Negotiation See page S4. Roundtable: The Publisher's "Rules of Acquisition" See page 55 

Jack Buser 

Jack Buser directs the Came Console market category at Dolby Laboratories, and has focused on 
Dolby's efforts with the game industry over the last four years. In that time, he coordinated the 
launch of both Dolby Digital and Dolby Pro Logic II on the current generation of game consoles, 
and secured support for Dolby technology with every major game publisher. Currently, he man- 
ages worldwide game developer support for Dolby, and is working on new technology and tools 
for next generation game platforms Jack has a degree in electrical engineering with a focus on 
music synthesis from the University of Illinois Sponsored Session: Encoders, Decoders, 
Technology, Oh My! See page 44 

Ed Byrne 

Ed Byrne is currently a level designer at Amaze Entertainment's Knowwonder studio, working on 
the Harry Potter series of titles for PC. Ed graduated from Trenton State College with B.F.A in 
Illustration in 1997 and has been making interactive software ever since He started making 
games professionally in 1999 as a designer for Ubi Soft, where among other things, he was part 
of the original creative team behind Splinter Cell Panel: State of the Art: Anatomy of 3D Level 
Design Seepage 69 

Mike Caloud 

Panel: ArtModJam See page 60 

Rob Caminos 

Rob Caminos is a game designer at Vicarious Visions where he was the Ul Designer for Crash 
Nitro Kart (PS2, GCN, Xbox) and Whiteout (PS2, and Xbox). For Crash Nitro Kart, he and the 
engineers created a proprietary Ul scripting language. At Looking Glass Studios, he was the 
Localization Coordinator for System Shock 2, and Thief Gold (PC) which were both localized in 
three languages Lecture: Cross Platform User Interface Development See page 62 

Jeremy Cantor 

Jeremy Cantor, an animation supervisor at Sony Pictures, has been working far too many hours a 
week as a character/creature animator & supervisor in the feature film industry for the past 
eight years at both Imageworks and Tippett Studio in Berkeley, CA. His film credits include Harry 
Potter, Evolution, Hollowman, My Favorite Martian and Starship Troopers. In addition to his current 
stint teaching CG character animation at the California Institute of the Arts in Valencia, Jeremy 
recently completed his duties as the art & animation director for Full Spectrum Warrior, an E3- 
award-winning console based training simulation project for the U.S. Army. Currently, he is gear- 
ing up to supervise the animation on Wes Craven's upcoming werewolf film, Cursed. Jeremy is 
also co-authoring Insprired 3D Short Film Production, which will be available at a bookstore in 
February 2004 Lecture: Raising the Bar on In-Game Character Animation See page 115 

Simon Carless 

Simon Carless is an editor at the technology web site Slashdot, specifically concentrating on 
Slashdot Games, and the software curator at San Francisco-based non-profit, the Internet 
Archive, home of the 30-billion page web site archive, the Wayback Machine. Simon has previ- 
ously worked as a lead game designer in his native England and then in California for companies 
such as Eidos Interactive and Atari Roundtable: Preserving Videogame History See page 78 

John Carmack 

See page 91 for bio. Kenote: A Candid Look at the Issues and Rewards of Bleeding Edge Engine 
Development See page 91 

Cem Cebenoyan 

Cem Cebenoyan is a software engineer working on the Technical Developer Relations team. Cem 
spends his days researching graphics techniques and helping game developers get the most out 
of graphics hardware. He has spoken at past Game Developer Conferences on character anima- 
tion, graphics performance, and non photorealistic rendering. Before joining Nvidia, he was a stu- 
dent/research assistant in the Graphics, Visualization, and Usability Lab at the Georgia Institute 
of Technology Sponsored Session: Next-Gen Special Effects Showcase See page 102; Sponsored 
Session: CPU Gems Showcase See page 99 



James Vlad Ceraldi 

James Vlad Ceraldi has been at Radical Entertainment for the past four years. Most recently, 
James was the producer of The Simpsons Hit and Run; however, he has also had the roles of 
lead Playstation programmer for Fox Sports Basketball and technical director for The Simpsons 
Road Race. Prior to Radical, he worked at Silicon Knights spending long hours and nights work- 
ing on Too Human and playing Team Fortress and Total Annihilation. His love of program- 
ming, playing, and making games started with the Timex Sinclair and continued through his 
TI994A, Commodore 64, and Amiga days Lecture: Producing Programmers: Strategies for 
Managing Technical Staff See page 86 

David Chan 

David Chan has worked at Bioware Corp. for the last six years. In that time he has moved up 
from content creator to being in charge of all things audio at the company Panel: Audio Asset 
Management for Large Projects See page 42 

Leslie Chard 

Leslie Chard is an attorney and business consultant in San Francisco, specializing in technology 
and content development and licensing. Leslie's clients include industry leaders such as Faith 
West (ringtones and mobile content). Real Networks (Rhapsody music on demand), Leadis 
(mobile semiconductors) and the HDMI consortium (creators of the next-generation High 
Definition Multimedia Interface standard). Previously, he was an attorney with Fenwick & West 
in San Francisco and the Silicon Valley, and with Keck.Mahin & Cate in Chicago, where he coun- 
seled clients on electronic commerce, intellectual property, technology development, and licens- 
ing issues. His clients included technology and content "providers" ranging from Sammy Hagar 
and Jerry Garcia to eBay, Electronic Arts, Liquid Audio and Macromedia. Before receiving his law 
degree, Leslie was a computer consultant with Anderson Consulting (now Accenture) where he 
specialized in implementing distribution and electronic commerce systems. Leslie received a B.A. 
in Mathematics/Computer Science from Wesleyan University (CT) and a J.D. from the University 
of Cincinnati Panel: Audio for Mobile See page 43 

Chris Charla 

Chris Charla is a senior producer at Digital Eclipse Software, one of the leading independent 
development studios in the U.S. Before joining Digital Eclipse, he worked at Imagine Media as 
editor in chief of Next Generation, and as launch editor of IGN.com. Some of Digital Eclipse's 
recent games include Lilo & Stitch, Spyro:Seaon of Flame, and Spider-Man the Movie, all for 
Game Boy Advance. Lecture: Pitching an Original IP: Notes from the Field See page 55 

Jim Charne 

Jim Charne is a Santa Monica, CA-based lawyer who has provided legal representation for clients 
in all aspects of interactive software entertainment since the mid-1980's. He entered the indus- 
try in 1983 as a producer for Activision, and served as VP Legal & Business of a large console 
developer. Jim has been faculty chair of the Legal and Business tutorial at CDC since 1998, chair 
of the lawyers committee that authors the ICDA Business Committee Contract Walk-Through, 
and writes "Famous Last Words," a monthly column on games contracting issues, for 
www.igda.org. In March, 2004, the week before GDC, he will chair the first ever segment on the 
games industry for the Practicing Law Institute's annual three-day continuing legal education 
program, "Counseling Clients in the Entertainment lndustry."Jim can be reached by email at 
charne@sprintmail.com or on the web at www.charnelaw.com Tutorial: (357) Leveraging 
Development Deals to Build Value in Your Studio See page 36; Lecture: Game Soundtracks: 
Structuring Your Deal Like the Movies See page 44 & $r, Roundtable: Getting Paid for Milestones: 
How to Avoid Being Stiffed When They're Giving Your Publisher Last Rites See page 32. Group 
Gathering: Lawyers' Group Gathering See page 76 

Angus Chassels 

Angus Chassels has worked for Secret Level since 2001. After initially re-organizing the company 
and shaping the business infrastructure to suit future growth, Angus now focuses on internal 
business operations and finances and external project evaluations. Prior to working at Secret 
Level, Angus founded a technology company that delivered advanced browser solutions to 
researchers and businesses, and worked as a management consultant for various Bay Area start- 
ups Lecture: Building Value in Your Company: One Small Studio's Approach See page 50 

Gavin Cheshire 

Gavin Cheshire is executive producer of Codemaster's hugely successful Club Football and LMA 
manager franchises. Gavin has worked on soccer games for 12 years, with total accumulative 
sales of all his titles now well in to the multiple millions Lecture: Developing and Mastering 36 
Different SKUs of One Title Simultaneously for the PS2 & Xbox See page 83 

Peter Clare 

Peter Clare as technical director, has been with Sensaura since 1997. Since that time he has been 
involved, during at least one point in the development cycle, in most of Sensaura 's technology 
and products. In 2001, Peter began managing the development of a new software product called 
GameCODA - a cross-platform game audio engine. Through Sensaura 's position as the leading 
supplier of 3D audio technology to the game industry Peter has maintained a close relationship 
with developers throughout his time at Sensaura. He graduated in 1980 from the University of 
Hull, UK. This was followed by three years of research into fault tolerant computer memory. From 
1983 to 1988 he developed real time software for safety critical communications systems. In 1988 
he moved to Thorn EMI's Central Research Laboratories. Whilst there, he held the position of proj- 
ect manager of a large (240 man years) collaborative research program Before moving to 
Sensaura, his last major role was managing a project to use advanced DSP technology for satel- 
lite ground station receivers. Tutorial: (347) Audio Boot Camp See page 36 

Eleanor Clarke 

Eleanor Clarke is Head of Human Resources at Havok. Based in Dublin Ireland, Eleanor is respon- 
sible for Havok's Global Human Resource requirements. Over the last four years at Havok, Eleanor 
has been instrumental in developing the company's culture and designing and implementing 
processes that have supported the company's growth and sustainability. In particular, Eleanor 
develops best practice policies and procedures in the areas of international recruitment, per- 




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SPEAKER BIOS 



formance management, compensation and benefits, employ- 
ee communications, training and development, and change 
management, Havok is incorporated in Ireland, the U.S., the 
U.K., and Germany. Eleanor graduated in 1998 from University 
College Dublin with a Master's degree in Human Resource 
Management, and is a Chartered Member of the Chartered 
Institute of Personnel and Development. Tutorial: (346) 
Human Resources Forum: Trends and Directions See page 33 

Mike Clarke 

Mike Clarke started his professional life composing music for 
Amiga games while still at school. He went on to full-time 
employment at Psygnosis HO where he created audio for 
most games between 1992 until 1999. After returning to free- 
lancing for a while, he went into full-time audio programming 
before landing a job at Sensaura where he contributes to the 
GameCODA design and maintains developer relations. He is 
committed to improving the quality of game audio. 
Sponsored Session: GameCODA: The Affordable Cross- 
Platform Came Audio Solution See page 44 

Shawn Clement 

Shawn Clement is a multidimensional composer with excep- 
tional versatility in both style of music and media. At any 
given moment, Shawn has projects airing on virtually every 
network of television, on cable, with theatrical and videogame 
projects simultaneously in distribution. The scores range from 
orchestral to techno to rock and everything in-between. 
Shawn's newest projects include Batman: Rise of Sin Tzu 
(Warner Bros./Ubi Soft); Sims 2 (Electronic Arts); TV Guide's 
Greatest Moments 2003 (Dick Clark Productions); Totally 
Outrageous Behavior (Fox); and 2004. A Light Knight's Odyssey 
(animated feature with John Travolta, Samuel Jackson, and 
others). Past projects include Buffy the Vampire Slayer, World's 
Scariest Police Chases, World's Wildest Police Videos, Are You 
Hot?, The Man Show, festival winner We Married Margo (star- 
ring Kevin Bacon and Cindy Crawford ); and Batman: 
Vengeance, to name a few Panel: Music Publishing: A Primer 
for Game Developers and Composers See page 54 

Dustin Clinginan 

Dustin Clingman is president of Zeitgeist Games, an Orlando- 
based startup which he co-founded along with Dave Arneson, 
the co-creator of Dungeons and Dragons. Zeitgeist is a 
hybrid studio developing electronic and non-electronic adven- 
ture games. Prior to founding Zeitgeist, he worked with 
Perpetual Motion Interactive as an engineer developing hand- 
held games Dustin also teaches at Full Sail and is the coordi- 
nator of the IGDA's Orlando chapter Tutorial: (343) 
Professional Java Game Development Techniques See page 35, 
Panel: IGDA Quality of Life White Paper Unveiling See page 76 

Aaron Coday 

Aaron Coday is an Intel staff software application engineer in 
Europe focusing on consumer applications. He joined Intel in 
1999, and has held various positions suchas systems valida- 
tion engineer, compiler developer, technical marketing engi- 
neer, and senior network software engineer. Prior to Intel, 
Aaron worked at Kuck and Assoc. Inc on compilers & debug- 
gers. His areas of expertise are compilers, software optimiza- 
tion, and multi-threaded software. Lecture: Real World Multi- 
Threading in PC Games See page 104 

Ted Cohen 

Ted Cohen, as Senior Vice President of Digital Development & 
Distribution for EMI Music, oversees worldwide digital busi- 
ness development for this "big five" record company, which 
includes labels such as Capitol, Virgin, Angel/Blue Note, 
Parlophone and Chrysalis. Under Ted's guidance, EMI has led 
the industry with its initiatives in new technologies and busi- 
ness models such as digital downloads, online music subscrip- 
tions, custom compilations, wireless services, high-definition 
audio and Internet radio. In addition to seeking out, evaluat- 
ing and executing business opportunities for the company, 
Ted serves as both a strategist and key decision-maker for 
EMI's global new media and anti-piracy efforts. He has worked 
to establish company-wide policies, which have allowed EMI's 
artists and labels a substantial advantage in the digital music 
arena. Ted served previously as the executive vice president of 
Digital Music Network Inc., where he co-founded and served 
as Chairman of the Webnoize '98 & '99 conferences. He cur- 
rently chairs MidemNet, an international music/technology 
conference convened in Cannes each year. Ted also held senior 
management positions at both Warner Bros. Records and 
Philips Media. Additionally, Ted lead two highly successful new 
media consulting operations, DMN Consulting and Consulting 
Adults, attracting clients such as Amazon.com, Microsoft, 



Universal Studios New Media, DreamWorks Records, Liquid 
Audio, Wherehouse Records/Checkout. com and several other 
entertainment, computer and new media organizations. A 25- 
year industry veteran, Ted serves on the NARAS (Grammy) Los 
Angeles chapter Board of Governors, the Board of Directors for 
the Neil Bogart Memorial Fund, Co-chairs the new media arm 
of the T.J. Martell Foundation, and lends his time and talents 
to the Grammy In the Schools Program Panel: Audio for 
Mobile Panel See page 43 

David Collier 

David 'DC Collier is a Tokyo-based mobile game business 
development agent. He works with U.S. and European pub- 
lishers entering the Japanese market, and Japanese publishers 
going global. David recently lead business strategy for 
Packetvideo Corporation, working with carrier customers 
worldwide including Docomo and T-Mobile. Pocketvideo 
developed a syndication system for mobile games. Prior to 
this David founded Gamelet.com in San Francisco, a leading 
developer and aggregator of online games and entertainment 
applications. Customers included Sony, Electronic Arts, Sega, 
Disney, and Microsoft. David is an award-winning videogame 
designer, having founded Tripmedia.com in London. Titles 
included Burn:Cycle which won numerous awards and was 
delivered in seven languages and three platforms. Sequel the 
Virtual Nightclub was the first CD-ROM game to feature 
interactive advertising from Levi jeans and others. He lives in 
Tokyo with 30 different cellphones each more beautiful than 
the last Roundtable: Mobile Games: Down to Business See 
page S3 

Dave Coombes 

David Commbes is a long-time employee of Sony Computer 
Entertainment, currently serving as a senior developer sup- 
port engineer for North America David has also worked in the 
European developer support group as well as in product 
development. Before that he worked as a consultant in the 
financial sector Lecture: Programming the Playstation 
Portable (PSP) See page 104 

Greg Costikyan 

Greg Costikyan has designed 30 commercially-released board, 
roleplaying, computer, online, and wireless games in a career 
spanning 4 decades. He designed the first online game to 
attract more than lm players; founded Unplugged Games, a 
wireless game company; and writes about games, game 
design, and the game industry for publications including The 
NY Times, Wall Street Journal Interactive, Salon, and Game 
Developer magazine. He is currently a consultant to clients 
including Unplugged Inc., the Themis Group, and IBM. 
Tutorial: (332) Muitiplayer Play: Designing Social Interaction in 
Games See page 34 

Christophe Couvreur 

Christophe Couvreur works for ScanSoft, Inc. where he is a 
Principal Research Engineer and the Embedded Engineering 
Group Manager based in Belgium He has led the effort to 
develop the ASRr6oo speech recognition engine and now 
oversees all engineering aspects of speech recognition on 
embedded platforms. He has been active in the field of speech 
recognition for more than seven years, first at Lernout & 
Hauspie and now at ScanSoft. Prior to joining the industry, 
Christophe held a variety of research and teaching positions 
at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, at Faculte 
Polytechnique de Mons, Belgium, and at the Swiss Institute of 
Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland. He also served as an 
officer in the Belgian Air Force. Christophe holds an 
Engineering degree in Communication, a MSc. in Electrical 
Engineering, a MSc in Mathematics and a PhD in Applied 
Science. Christophe has authored more than 40 scientific 
papers Sponsored Session: Speech Recognition for Games See 
page 46 

Chris Crawford 

Chris Crawford started his career with Atari, in 1979 where he 
worked under Alan Kay as a manager of games research. He 
has published 14 games and 5 books, including The Art of 
Computer Game Design. Among his many titles are ones deal- 
ing with policy (Balance of Power), nuclear energy (SCRAM), 
and environmental issues (Balance of the Planet). Chris found- 
ed and chaired the GDC for many years. Currently Chris is 
focusing on interactive storytelling technology. Tutorial: 
Serious Games Summit See page 31 

John Crocker 

John Crocker has worked as lead programmer for Tools at 
Incog Inc. for more than four years, during which he support- 



ed Incog's three titles: Downhill Domination, War of the 
Monsters, and Twisted Metal: Black. He made significant 
contributions to the collision, animation, and rendering sub- 
systems of the engine for these three titles. In addition, he 
shared application-level responsibility for dynamics and inter- 
active elements in Downhill Domination Prior to working at 
Incog, he was employed at Evans & Sutherland for ten years 
as both a 3D graphics modeler and a programmer. He earned 
a B.A. in Computer Science and Philosophy from Macalester 
College in St. Paul, Minnesota; he finds computer science to 
have somewhat greater utility Lecture: Destruction on a Diet 
See page 96 

Chris Cross 

Chris Cross of Electronic Arts first entered the videogame 
industry as a game tester for Blizzard. After testing Warcraft 
II, EXP and Diablo for Blizzard, Cross moved to Dreamworks 
Interactive. Chris was assistant lead tester for Chaos Island. 
He then helped design Trespasser and Small Soldiers Squad 
Commander, the first games he designed. With the acquisi- 
tion of Dreamworks Interactive by Electronic Arts Chris took 
over as lead designer for the original Medal of Honor and 
international best seller Medal of Honor Frontline. He is 
now Game Design director, overseeing a team of designers on 
the EALA studio team Lecture: Four at a Time: Techniques for 
Maximizing Enemy and Object Placement See page 63 

Don Dag-low 

Don L. Daglow founded Stormfront Studios in 1988, earning 
Electronic Games magazine's recognition as "one of the best- 
known and respected producers in the history of the field." 
Stormfront's titles include The Lord of the Rings: The Two 
Towers PS2/Xbox (for EA and New Line Cinema), and the 
upcoming Forgotten Realms PS2/Xbox (for Atari) Prior to 
founding Stormfront, Don served as director of Intellivision 
game development for Mattel, as a producer at Electronic 
Arts, and as head of the Entertainment and Education division 
at Broderbund. He designed and programmed the first-ever 
computer baseball game in 1971, the first computer role-play- 
ing game, 1976, the first sim game Intellivision Utopia, 1982, 
and the first original play-by-email game Quantum Space for 
AOL, 1989 Don co-designed Computer Game Hall of Fame 
title Earl Weaver Baseball (1987) and the first massively mui- 
tiplayer online graphic adventure. Neverwinter Nights for 
AOL (1991-97) Lecture: Building Big Licensed Games with Big 
Teams See page 83 

William Damon 

William Damon is a technical marketing engineer within 
Intel's Software Solutions Group. He has a Bachelor's degree in 
Computer Science from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and 
State University, where he graduated with honors. He has 
been with Intel for two years, working with various game 
developers to enable their titles to achieve high performance. 
His areas of interest include software engineering, computer 
graphics, mathematics, physics, artificial intelligence, and per- 
formance optimization. William can be contacted at 
william.e.damon@intel.com. Lecture: Real World Multi- 
Threading in PC Games See page 104 

Richard Dansky 

Richard Dansky formerly a line developer at White Wolf Game 
Studios, has written, designed, or contributed to more than a 
hundred gaming books, some of which people have actually 
heard of. His first novel, Lasombra, was published in 1999, and 
2001 saw the release of his Trilogy of the Second Age. Richard 
currently works at Red Storm Entertainment in Mornsville, NC, 
as the manager of the design department, as well as the cen- 
tral writer on all Tom QANCY-related games He lives in 
Durham, NC, with the lovely and talented Melinda Thielbar, 
and their slightly less lovely and talented cats. Panel: Island 
Thunder and Raven Shield: Creating Believable Stories for 
Realistic Games See page 66 

Keith D'Arcy 

Keith D'Arcy is the Director of Music Resources at EMI Music 
Publishing. EMI is the world's largest independent music pub- 
lishing company, controlling some 1.5 million song copyrights 
by artists like Snoop Dogg, Jay-Z, Good Charlotte, Foo Fighters. 
Blur, Gorillaz.The Donnas, Pink, N.E.R.D., Marilyn Manson, Ozzy 
Osbourne, and Crystal Method Panel: Music Licensing for 
Videogames: How Popular Music and Artists Can Make 
Games Pop See page S4 

Di Davies 

Di Davies of Vicarious Visions has been in the games industry 
since 1992 as an animator, lead artist, art director, group man- 



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SPEAKER BIOS 



ager, and now visual development director She has worked for companies such as: Electronic 
Arts (Canada), Bullfrog Productions (UK), Angel Studios (CA), and now Vicarious Visions (NY), To 
date, Davies has over 30 published game titles to her credit on a variety of different platforms; 
some of these titles include: Crash Nitro Kart (PS2/XBox), Spongebob Souarepants: Revenge of 
the Flying Dutchman (GameBoy Advance), Test Drive Offroad 4 (PS2/XB0X), Smuggler's Run, 
Midnight Club (PS2), Midtown Madness 1 and 2 (PC) and multiple versions of FIFA Soccer for 
EA. She has several published articles in Gamasutra on the subjects of lead art roles and art 
career development- Prior to joining the games industry, Di was an animator in the traditional 
animation field for eight years working on more than 60 TV commercials, features, and TV spe- 
cials Lecture: Artist Management in a Small Games Company See page 82 

John Davis 

John Davis is currently a user-testing engineer for Microsoft Game Studios, Before coming to the 
user testing group, John was a usability engineer in the Social Computing Group (SCG) at 
Microsoft Research, where he conducted research to explore various social dimensions of com- 
puter-mediated communication and decision making. Before joining Microsoft, he was an assis- 
tant professor of psychology at Seattle University John earned his B.S. in psychology from Texas A 
& M University (yes. he is an Aggie) and his Ph.D. in Experimental Social and Personality 
Psychology from the University of Washington. Tutorial: (359) Do-it-Yourself Usability: A Crash 
Course on User-Testing See page 34 

Steven DeBenedictis 

Steven DeBenedictis of Bump Rivers Industries works as a strategic partner with publishers and 
studios advising on business strategies and software development practices. He has a compre 
hensive background in product management and business planning with technology develop- 
ment and entertainment media companies including Lycos. Akamai, and 3Com. He has worked 
extensively in the Internet media, data networking, and software development industries creat- 
ing products and online services for electronic entertainment and distribution. Prior to his online 
technology and Internet media career Steven worked in leading technology and management 
consulting firms, and founded a successful web development company. He has a B.S. from Tufts 
University and an MBA. from Bentley College Panel: The State of the Web and Downloadable 
Games Industry See page 57 

Paul Debevec 

Paul Debevec (Ph.D., UC Berkeley '96) leads the computer graphics research group at USC's 
Institute for Creative Technologies. At UC Berkeley he worked with C.J.Taylor to create the 
"Facade" image-based modeling system, which produced the realistic fly around of the Berkeley 
campus in his 1997 film The Campanile Movie and whose techniques were used to create the 
Academy Award-winning virtual backgrounds for the "bullet time" shots in the 1999 film The 
Matrix. Since then Paul has focused on techniques for capturing, rendering, and reproducing 
real-world illumination in order to realistically combine computer-generated and real-world 
imagery. His 1999 film Fiat Lux used high dynamic range imagery and image-based lighting to 
place towering monoliths and gleaming spheres into a photorealistic reconstruction of St. Peter's 
Basilica, all illuminated by the light that was actually there Lecture: High Dynamic Range 
Lighting See page 99 

Frank Delise 

Frank Delise was previously Product Manager for 3D Studio Max and was instrumental in the 
design and management of 3D Studio Max versions 2-5. He holds two patents (pending) in the 
field of 3D computer graphics and animation. Most recently, Frank led the development effort of 
the "Desert Combat" modification for EA's Battlefield: 1942 as well as developing custom modifi- 
cation development tools Tutorial: (350) The Art of Modeling and Animating Triple A Titles in 
Maya See page 34. Sponsored Session: Real-time Shaders Made Easy See page 113. Sponsored 
Session: The Next Level: Visual Real-time Shader Creation See page 114 

Jason Delia Rocca 

Jason Delia Rocca oversees the day-to-day management of the International Game Developers 
Association, working to build a unified global game development community and provide a com- 
mon voice for developers. Jason and the IGDA deal with such diverse topics as anti-censorship 
advocacy, academic relations, business issues, workplace diversity and developer quality of life 
Jason also oversees the running of the Game Developers Choice Awards, an annual industry 
event which recognizes and rewards outstanding achievement within the game development 
community. Jason has been a member of the game development community for many years, and 
has spent time at Matrox Graphics, Quazal and Silicon Graphics Tutorial: (351) Developer 
Business Summit: An IGDA Think-Tank See page 31 

Mark DeLoura 

See page 13 for bio Panel: Towards Relevant Research: Collaboration 101 See page 79 

Craig Derrick 

Craig Derrick has eight years of production experience in the industry and is currently a project 
manager for Vicarious Visions. He began his career working for Parallax Software/Outrage 
Entertainment and served as the producer on Descent II: The Infinite Abyss, Descent Maximum, 
and the highly acclaimed Descent 3 At Vicarious Visions he has been responsible for the produc- 
tion of Finding NemoJet Grind Radio, Disney's Extreme Skate Adventure, and Tony Hawk's 
Underground, each for the Game Boy Advance. Craig is a chapter coordinator for the Albany 
Chapter of the IGDA and a member of the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences. Lecture: 
Beyond Fun: Setting Aesthetic Goals and Sticking to Them See page 61 

Steve Derrick 

Steve Derrick of Vicarous Visions has been lead artist on several notable Game Boy Advance titles 
such as Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure, Crash Bandicoot: Entranced!, X-Men 
Wolverine's Revenge, Spider-Man: Mysterio's Menace. Steve has a degree in computer anima- 
tion from the Art Institute of Phoenix and a B.F.A. in painting and drawing from the University of 
Utah Lecture: Artist Management in a Small Games Company See page 82 



John DesJardin 

See page no for bio Keynote: Workflow Convergence: How Motion Picture Pipelines Are 
Merging With Game Development See page no 

Shekhar Dhupelia 

Shekhar Dhupelia's (of Midway Games, LLC) first foray into the games industry took the form of 
two years working with the SCE-RT group of Sony (SCEA) in San Diego, developing the online 
software and server infrastructure that power SOCOM: US Navy Seals, Frequency, Amplitude, 
Twisted Metal Black Online, NFL Gameday, and many other Playstation2 titles. He followed this 
with a brief stint working on Microsoft's NBA Inside Drive 2004 XBox Live implementation. Now, 
he is working with Midway Games, with the NBA Bailers team in Chicago Additionally, Shekhar 
is an article author in the upcoming Came Programming Gems 4 by Charles River Media. 
Roundtable: The Challenge for New Ideas in Online Console Gaming See page 61 

Sim Dietrich 

Tutorial: (337) Advanced Visual Effects with Direct3D See page 33 

Gavin Dodd 

Gavin Dodd implemented the content protection for the PlayStation games Spyro 2: Ripto's 
Rage, and Spyro:Year of the Dragon. The protection for the former was cracked within a week, 
the latter in a little under three months. Gavin wrote an article about the techniques used and 
their effectiveness titled "Keeping the Pirates at Bay" for Gome Developer magazine. Having 
worked in the games industry for the past twelve years, he is currently employed at Insomniac 
Games as head of the tools department. Sponsored Session: The Security Bottom Line See page 
106 

Thomas Dolby Robertson 

The advent of MTV brought Thomas Dolby Robertson his initial exposure in the early 1980s: His 
intelligent videos stand out from the pack, and his songs "She Blinded Me With Science" and 
"Hyperactive" are huge hits. Numerous awards and five Grammy nominations later.Thomas has 
achieved worldwide recognition as an artist. Thomas first drew the attention of fellow artists 
and record companies to the opportunities for digital distribution of music via the Internet as 
early as 1994. In July 1998, Thomas received a Lifetime Achievement in Internet Music award 
from Yahoo! Internet Life. His game soundtrack credits include Double Switch, Cyberia, Dark 
Eye, and Obsidian. While Thomas continued to pursue his own creative endeavors, developers of 
synthesizers, audio software, and computer games courted Thomas to help them improve the 
audio capabilities of their products. Thomas sought to create software that would make music 
and sound truly interactive. With the advent of the web, he found the perfect media for interac- 
tive audio, and now wireless devices are taking that vision mobile. Thomas built the company 
Beatnik around a team of musically savvy engineers and technically astute musicians, and 
secured top management and funding. The excellence of Beatnik's software synthesis technolo- 
gy has been underscored by high-profile agreements with companies such as Nokia, Sony 
Ericsson, Motorola, Samsung, Siemens, and more. Now retired from Beatnik, Thomas is still push- 
ing the envelope with his new ringtone library company Retro Ringtones LLC Panel: Audio for 
Mobile Panel See page 43 

Sebastien Domine 

Sebastien Domine is the Manager of Developer Technology Tools at Nvidia where he works on 
various projects dedicated to make 3D developer's life easier. Prior to Nvidia, he worked at 
GameFX/THO, Katrix and Nichimen Graphics. He received his Diplome d'lngenieur in Computer 
Science from EPITA, Paris, France Sponsored Session: Tools to Squeeze Maximum Performance 
from Your GPU See page 107 

Doyle Donehoo 

Doyle W. Donehoo of Radar Music is a self-contained game composer, which means he delivers 
final mastered original composed music from his studio using the latest computer and music 
technology. While delivering music in any style desired, his specialty is larger than life bombastic 
Hollywood movie-style symphonic scores with high production values. All of his recordings so far 
were created entirely in his studio, and no live music or live musicians were used. Doyle also 
delivers music in Surround and DOLBY 5.1 Surround. Much of Doyle's music can be easily found 
on his web site www.sierra-trails.com/radarmusic.html. Doyle have spent many years in the 
computer industry as a senior Windows software engineer and manager, and he is comfortable 
working with software professionals found in the game and music industry. Doyle is very famil- 
iar with getting projects 'out the door' under extreme pressure. Panel: The Virtual and Mixed 
Media Orchestra for Game Music See page 47 

Mike Dornbrook 

Mike Dornbrook, an industry veteran, recently celebrated his 24th anniversary in the computer 
games industry. He began his career in 1979 with the inception of Infocom, where he started as 
the tester for Zork I. Subsequently he founded the Zork User's Group, created The New Zork Times 
newsletter and the industry's first hint books, InvisiClues. He then headed up Infocom's market- 
ing through most of the 1980's, launching over 40 top-ten best sellers, and is particularly proud 
of championing The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Calaxy and Leather Goddesses ofPhobos. Before 
joining Harmonix, he was co-founder and president of Boffo Games, best-known for The Space 
Bar. For the past six years Mike has been at Harmonix Music Systems, best known for Frequency, 
Amplitude, and Karaoke Revolution. Mike is Harmonix's COO, responsible for Sales, Marketing, 
Finance. Legal. HR, and all the other boring stuff Tutorial: (346) Human Resources Forum: Trends 
and Directions See page 33 



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Mike Drummelsmith 

Mike Drummelsmith joined Ouazal in February 2003, after 
spending three years at Matrox Graphics in the capacity of 
developer relations manager. During that time he was a part 
of various massively multiplayer online game releases and 
betas, gaining lots of first hand experience with the pitfalls of 
making a networked title. He thinks monkeys can make any- 
thing more funny Sponsored Session: Introducing Rendez- 
vous: A Powerful and Flexible Solution for Developing an 
Online Lobby Service See page too 

Eric Dybsand 

Eric Dybsand of 2015 Inc. is currently finishing up a series of 
articles on Al Middleware, scheduled to appear later this year. 
He has consulted on an extensive list of computer games, 
including designing and developing the Al for Full Spectrum 
Command, a tactical command simulator used by the US 
Army. And he has designed strategic Al for MOO3, Al for 
Racing, Baseball, and Wrestling games. He developed the Al 
opponents for the RTS game Enemy Nations, the FPS games 
Rebel Moon Revolution and the War in Heaven, and a num- 
ber of turn-based wargames Eric has been involved with com- 
puter game Al since 1987, doing game design, programming 
and testing, and is a contributing author on Al to the Came 
Programming Cems and Al Wisdom series Roundtable: Al in 
Computer Games Roundtables and Interactive Discussion See 
page 93 

Brad Edelman 

Brad Edelman has spent the past twenty years participating 
in the evolution of interactive computer graphics and applica- 
tions, from Apple, videogames to Internet video conferencing. 
Before founding Uccello Games, Brad was a key contributor at 
Macromedia (Breeze Live, Flash, Flash Communication Server, 
Shockmachine/Shockwave), Adobe (PageMill), and 
Apple/Taligent (Ul frameworks). Brad holds a Bachelor of 
Science degree in Computer Science from the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. While at MIT, Brad researched 3D com- 
puter graphics and synthetic holography at the Media Lab, 
and wrote his undergraduate thesis on digital image morph- 
ing. Tutorial: (334) Casual Games Summit See page 34 

Roger Edgar 

Sponsored Session: CodeWarrior Game Development 

Technology See page 95 

David Eichorn 

David Eichorn of Microsoft Game Studios graduated with a 
B.S. in computer science and a B.E. in Electrical Engineering 
from Youngstown State University in 2000. Hired straight out 
of school by Microsoft as a Software Design Engineer/Test, he 
spent the next 2+ years designing and implementing test 
automation for Impossible Creatures and developing top 
secret internal tools, and is currently working on several 
Microsoft Game Studios projects and more top secret internal 
tools Tutorial: (342) Test Automation in Game Development 
See page 35. Roundtable: Lua in the Gaming Industry See page 
100 

Jared Emerson-Johnson 

Jared Emerson Johnson first joined the Bay Area Sound 
Department as a music intern in the summer of 2002. In that 
capacity he played an integral role in the composition, orches- 
tration, and part preparation for the full live orchestral score 
to indiana Jones and the Emperor's Tomb. In June of 2003, after 
completing a bachelor's degree in music summa cum laude at 
Cornell University, he became a full-time employee of the Bay 
Area Sound Department. Since then he has performed music 
composition and sound design for an array of top upcoming 
game titles including James Bond: Everything or Nothing, 
Lord of the Rings: Return of the King, Psychonauts, 
Battlestar Galactica as well as several educational titles for 
Leapfrog. Panel: Audio Asset Management for Large Projects 
See page 42 

Thomas Engel 

Thomas Engel is one of the founders of Factor 5, LLC and has 
been working in the industry for more than 12 years. As Factor 
5's director of technology, his focus has been on the technolo- 
gy behind the gameplay. Thomas has been working on graph- 
ics and sound engines, as well as complete games, since the 
Amiga days. He worked as technical lead engineer on Factor 
5's latest games including Star Wars; Rogue Squadron-Rebel 
Strike. See page XX Lecture: Light Scattering: Can We Have it 
in the Game, Real Quick? See page wo 



Cass Everitt 

Cass Everitt is an engineer in the OpenGL Applications 
Engineering group at Nvidia. Prior to joining Nvidia, he 
worked in the scientific visualization branch of computer 
graphics, focusing on oceanographic and meteorological 
model visualization. Tutorial: (340) Advanced OpenGL Tutorial 
See page 35 

Noah Falstein 

Noah Falstein programmed his first computer game in 1976, 
and has been employed in the games industry since 1980, 
working for companies including LucasArts, 3DO, and 
Dreamworks Interactive. Currently, Falstein is the president of 
The Inspiracy, a design consulting company with clients on 
five continents, including Disney Interactive, Dreamworks 
Interactive, Shell Oil, l-lmagine Entertainment, EA, and Intel 
The Inspiracy (www.theinspiracy.com) provides game design 
and production expertise for entertainment, education, and 
corporate training Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 
3> 

Todd Fay 

Todd M. Fay is a gun for hire in the interactive entertainment 
industry, having seen tours of duty working with Creative Labs 
ATC, Blizzard Entertainment, THO, Cognitoy, G4 Media, Tommy 
Tallarico Studios, and various private parties.Todd is the direc- 
tor of development for the Game Audio Network Guild 
(www.audiogang org). He released his first book DirectX 9.0 
Audio Exposed: Interactive Audio Development in 2003. Todd 
holds a Bachelor of Music in Sound Recording Technology 
from the University of Massachusetts Lowell Panel: The State 
of Non-Linear Audio for Interactive Media See page 46 

Mary Flanagan 

Panel: ArtModJam See page 60 

Tom Forsyth 

Tom Forsyth has been obsessed by 3D graphics since seeing 
Elite on his ZX Spectrum. Since then he has always tried to 
make hardware beg for mercy. Tom has written triangle-draw- 
ing routines on the Spectrum, Sinclair QL, Atari ST, Sega 32X, 
Saturn, Dreamcast, PC, GamePark32, and Xbox, and he's get- 
ting quite good at them now. Tom's coding past includes writ- 
ing curved-surface stuff for Sega and graphics drivers for 
3Dlabs. Currently he works in Guildford at Muckyfoot 
Productions, whose past projects include Urban Chaos, 
Startopia and Blade II Lecture: Practical Shadows: Out of the 
Demo and Into the Engine See page 104 

Anders Frank 

Anders Frank is currently a researcher on games at the 
Swedish National Defence College. He started looking at the 
potential of using games for non-entertainment purposes in 
Menlo Park. CA where he was stationed at the Attache Office 
to analyze the US computer and video games industry. Since 
then he has established laboratories, conferences and lectured 
frequently. Previously he was leading virtual reality and 3D 
graphics projects within the Swedish Defence R&D program. 
Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 31 

Gonzalo Frasca 

Gonzalo Frasca is both a game designer and academic game 
researcher (balancing those two aspects of his life is harder 
than most RTS games). Gonzalo has been working on a 
videogame theory for almost a decade now. He publishes 
Ludologyorg, an online resource for academic game research 
and he is review editor for Came Studies, the international 
academic game journal. A former head of game production at 
Cartoon Network L.A., he now runs his own studio: Powerful 
Robot Games. He recently launched Newsgaming.com, an 
independent project examining the boundaries between jour- 
nalism and videogames Roundtable: Practical Game Theory: 
Academics Fragging Developers See page j8 

David Freeman 

David Freeman's talks at the two previous GDCs were met 
with rave reviews, and this one should be no different. David 
is the author of Creating Emotion in Games. Along with his 
game design and writing consultancy, The Freeman Group 
(www.freemangames.com), he is currently working, or has 
worked, as a designer and/or writer, on three games for 
Vivendi Universal Games (including Van Helsing), two games 
for Atari (Mission Impossible Operation Surma and 
Terminator: Redemption), a game for Electronic Arts 
(Command and Conquer 3), two games for Activision, two 
games for 3D Realms (Duke Nukem Forever and Prey), and 
others. He also contributed to the script for Atari's Enter the 



Matrix, and has worked on game projects for Microsoft and 
Midway Games. David teaches Beyond Structure 
(www.beyondstructure.com), L.A.'s and N.Y.'s most popular 
screenwriting class, also offered in London and Sydney. 
Lecture: 14 Ways of Drawing Players in with an Opening 
Cinematic See page 63 

Barry Friedman 

Barry Friedman of Fog Studios has enjoyed a 23-year career 
that has earned him a well-respected reputation in high tech 
circles as consummate deal maker and visionary. Barry and his 
first company, International Computer Group (ICG), have been 
behind a number of key agreements in the online, multime- 
dia, and software industries. Since 1979, ICG has been the 
exclusive representative of major software developers; pub- 
lishers and intellectual property rights holders for develop- 
ment, licensing and distribution agreements. One high-profile 
agreement that Barry initiated was between Prodigy and 
ESPN in 1994, to create the extremely well-known 
ESPNET/SportsZone. At the time, the deal was judged by 
industry analysts to be the largest in online history. Friedman 
finalized arrangements with Starwave for the creation of its 
ESPNET/SportsZone web site, and shortly thereafter, was also 
responsible for the sale of Westwood Studios to Virgin 
Interactive Panel: The Negotiation See page 54 

Peter H. Friedman 

Peter H. Friedman is the proprietor of a Certified Public 
Accounting firm that specializes in economic/financial and 
taxation consulting for businesses. Peter was endorsed by the 
Governor and the State Senators of the State of New 
Hampshire as the candidate for the position of Small Business 
Representative on the IRS Oversight Committee. He attended 
the annual U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission 
Government-Business Forum on Small Business Capital 
Formation since 1992. He contributed to the Independent 
Came Developers Association 2003 Online Came White Paper 
on legal, tax, and financial issues of wireless gaming. He has 
lectured in front of various State Bar and CPA Societies on 
multi-state and international tax issues of electronic com- 
merce and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. He is currently the 
Chairman of the tax committee of the New Hampshire 
Society of CPA's. Peter is licensed to practice in the states of 
New Hampshire and New York. Contact Peter at peter@>peter- 
friedmancpa.com Lecture: Understanding the Elements of 
Employee Compensation See page 57 

Sky Frostenson 

Panel: ArtModJam See page 60 

Bill Fulton 

Bill Fulton is a founder and the manager of the User-testing 
Group at the Microsoft Game Studios. The group uses psycho- 
logical research methods to collect feedback that improves 
the fun and ease of use of games published by Microsoft. Bill 
has contributed to 25+ titles directly (including Age of 
Empires, Combat Flight Simulator, Asheron's Call, and The 
Madness series), and overseen work on almost all other 
Microsoft titles since 1999. All told, the user-testing Group has 
tested 16,000+ gamers playing more than 100 different 
games (from both Microsoft and its competitors), on PC and 
all major console platforms. Prior to working at Microsoft, Bill 
completed four years of postgraduate training in cognitive 
and quantitative psychology at the University of Washington, 
studying how people form judgments and make decisions, 
and how to meaningfully quantify theoretical ideas. For some 
publications from Bill and other members of the User-testing 
Group, see www.microsoft.com/playtest/publications.htm. 
Lecture: User-testing in a Hostile Environment: Overcoming 
Apathy and Resistance in Game Companies See page 88 

John Gaeta 

See page 109 for bio. Keynote: From Visual Anti- 
EstablishmentarianismTo Ubiquity & Back See page 109 

Michelle Gamboa 

Michelle Gamboa has been a resident gamer grrl and soft- 
ware test engineer in Microsoft Game Studios for more than 
seven years, having shipped multiple titles including 
Mechassault (Xdox).Munch's Oddysee (Xbox). Crimson 
Skies (PC), and Age of Empires (PC). She has a computer sci- 
ence background from Cal Poly and the University of 
Washington and is currently the test lead for Mechassault's 
LIVE' downloadable content for FASA Studio. Tutorial: (331) 
Playtesting Strategies See page 32 



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Alex Garden 

Alex Garden began his career in the video game industry at age 15 working as a game tester for 
Vancouver B.C. -based Distinctive Software Inc. While developing his carreer, Alex worked with 
some of the world's leading developers at Electronic Arts Canada and Radical Entertainment. In 
1997, Alex and a dedicated group of his peers started Relic Entertainment and produced their 
first title Hom eworld which was released in 1999 to become PC Corner's "Game of the Year." 
Currently 28 years old, Alex is now leading the strategic growth of Relic as it moves into it's 
future as one of the best PC game development studios in the world. Panel: Starting a New 
Studio See page 56 

Michael Gartenberg 

Michael Gartenberg leads Jupiter Research's team on emerging technology platforms and pro- 
vides advice that helps clients take advantage of a variety of access technologies, digital infor- 
mation devices and software platforms teveraging Jupiter Research's expertise in these areas, he 
helped launch Jupiter's PC & Console Games service, Wi-Fi Mobility service and Jupiter Research's 
Analyst Weblogs. Michael has been quoted extensively about personal, mobile and digital enter- 
tainment technologies in industry trade publications online and in print, as well as in leading 
publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Time, Newsweek, and the 
Associated Press. He has also been a guest commentator on network news shows as well as CNN, 
CNBC and MSNBC. Michael also currently writes a monthly business technology column for 
Computerworld magazine. Prior to Jupiter Research. Michael was managing director at Hudson 
Ventures, a Manhattan-based venture capital firm. Prior to Hudson, Michael was vice president 
and Research Area Director of Gartner Inc., leading the Personal and Distributed Technologies 
research area. At Gartner, his research focused on personal and mobile computing He was also 
recognized at Gartner and throughout the technology industry as the leading watcher and ana- 
lyst covering Microsoft Corp Michael holds both his B.A. and MA from Yeshiva University in New 
York Tutorial: (351) Developer Business Summit: An IGDA Think-Tank See page 31 

James Paul Gee 

James Paul Gee, a theoretical linguist by training is theTashia Morgridge Professor of Reading in 
the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin. Inspired by his then six-year-old son, he 
began playing and eventually doing research on computer and video games and has written a 
variety of pieces on the subject including the widely acclaimed book What Video Games Have to 
Teach Us About Learning and Literacy Tutorial: (348) Serious Games Summit See page 31, Lecture: 
Learning by Design: Games as Learning Machines See page 76 

Kevin Gee 

Kevin Gee has worked in the games industry for over seven years and has shipped titles span- 
ning many genres from flight simulation through racing games. Kevin works in the Microsoft 
Windows Third-Party Gaming team where he helps developers create compelling content for the 
Windows platform Sponsored Session: Microsoft DirectX High-Level Shader Language Workshop 
See page to? 

Robert Gehorsam 

Robert Gehorsam is Vice President of Strategic Initiatives at There Inc., where he oversees the 
company's government, industry and educational business. Gehorsam has held a number of 
major online development positions including working on the creation of Everquest, Wheel of 
Fortune and Jeopardy! Online. At There Inc. Gerhorsam is currently working on contract with 
the US Army to develop a new massively-multiuser persistent world training platform using 
There Inc's technologies Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 31 

Rich Geldreich 

Rich Geldreich is a veteran game developer who has developed games for companies including 
Sandbox, DICE, and Blue Shift in addition to working directly with Microsoft's Advance 
Technology Group on console technology. His PC credits include Matchbox Rescue, 
Montezuma's Return, and technology created for Ensemble's Ace of Empires series. Rich's con- 
sole credits include engine design for Shrek for the Xbox, and World Series Baseball 2003 for 
Xbox and PS2. Most recently Rich has joined Ensemble Studios where he is working on advanced 
console technology for an unannounced game series. Lecture: Deferred Shading on DXg Class 
Hardware and the Xbox See page 96 

Scott Gershin 

Scott Martin Gershin started and Soundelux over 15 years ago. Scott founded Soundelux DMG as 
a cutting-edge multimedia group 10 years ago. His credits as a film supervisor, sound designer 
and gamer are extensive. His film credits include: Blade II, American Beauty, Shrek, Evolution, 3000 
Miles to Craceland, The Perfect Storm, Gladiator, Tarzan, Godzilla, The Prince of Egypt. Courage 
under Fire, Pocahontas, Braveheart, etc Panel: Mixing and Mastering Music and Sound for 
Games See page 45 

John Giors 

John Giors at GDC 2004 has more than five years on-the-job game programming experience. In 
addition, he has five years programming experience in other fields, including embedded systems 
and image processing John has an M.S.E.E.from Cal Poly, Pomona. He currently works at 
Pandemic Studios in Westwood, California, implementing the camera system and in-game user 
interfaces for Full Spectrum Warrior. Lecture: The Full Spectrum Warrior Camera System See 
page 98 

Rich Goldman 

Rich Goldman, creative director and founder of Riptide Music, is a music producer with broad 
experience as a musician, producer, studio operator, and sound designer for computer games, TV, 
commercials, theatrical trailers, network promotion, and sonic branding. His credits range from 
commercials for McDonalds, the movie trailers of Solaris and BMW Films, video games Mission 
Impossible and Legion/The Legend of ExcALiBUR.and sonic branding for Infogrames, Intel, and 
MSN Goldman has earned several Gold Records and numerous advertising awards for his work. 
He is a board member of G.A.N G. (The Game Audio Network Guild), an industry organization 
dedicated to the advancement of interactive audio, and is also a member of NARAS. He negoti- 
ates all agreements for Riptide Music Roundtable: Audio Business Issues Roundtable 2004 See 
page 42 



Andrew Gordon 

Andrew Gordon has been animating characters professionally for ten years. He was the lead ani- 
mator on the character "Mike" in Monsters, Inc. at Pixar Animation Studios as well and also 
worked extensively on Finding Nemo. He is currently finishing upon The Incredibles. Prior to Pixar, 
Andrew worked in classic animation at Warner Bros Sponsored Session: Storytelling and 
Animation: Part I See page 1/5: Sponsored Session: Storytelling and Animation: Part 2 See page 715 

Bing' Gordon 

W. Bingham (Bing) Gordon, is a co-founder of Electronic Arts. As chief creative officer and execu- 
tive vice president, Gordon plays a key role in providing counsel to marketing, studio producers 
and development teams to continue to ensure that EA's games are the most creative and innova- 
tive titles on the market. Considered one of the most experienced entertainment software mar- 
keting executives in the industry, Gordon most recently served as executive vice president of 
marketing, overseeing marketing staffs located in San Mateo and Walnut Creek, California, 
Austin, Texas, Vancouver, British Columbia, and London, England. Prior to that, Gordon served as 
executive vice president of EA studios, a post he held since 1993, and senior vice president of 
Entertainment Production, responsible for the design, development, and production of entertain- 
ment titles and creative properties. Gordon received a B.A. from Yale University and an M.B.A. 
from Stanford University Tutorial: (351) Developer Business Summit: An IGDA Think-Tank See 
page 31 

Jeremy Gordon 

Jeremy Gordon has spent the last ten years running small self-funded game development com- 
panies. For the past four years Jeremy has served as the president/CEO of San Francisco based 
Secret tevel, developers of tools, technology, and game titles for the console and PC game mar- 
kets. At Secret Level Jeremy has helped create and grow strategic relationships with companies 
such as Epic Games, Atari, and LucasArts Entertainment Company Sponsored Tutorial: (444) 
World Building in Maya See page 36, Lecture: Building Value in Your Company: One Small 
Studio's Approach See page so 

David Gosselin 

Dave Gosselin is currently the lead for the demo team in the 3D Application Research Group at 
ATI Research, where he has been working on the launch demos for the past couple of genera- 
tions of ATI cards. In addition to the demos, he also wrote ATI's Normal Mapper tool for generat- 
ing bump/normal maps from high resolution models. He has published articles in ShaderX and 
Game Programming Gems 3 and spoken at Meltdown 2003 and GDCE 2003. Previously, Dave 
worked at companies including Oracle, Spacetec IMC, Xyplex, and MIT Lincoln Laboratory on a 
variety of projects, from low level networking and web technologies to image processing and 3D 
input devices. Dave graduated with a M.S. in Computer Science from Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute Tutorial: (337) Advanced Visual Effects with Direct 3D See page 33 

Sheri Graner Ray 

Sheri Graner Ray is a senior game designer with Sony Online Entertainment and author of 
Gender Inclusive Game Design-. Expanding the Market Sheri is currently co-chair for the Women in 
Game Development Committee of the IGDA and has been a spokesperson for the female game 
player for many years. Before coming to Sony, she served as president of her own studio, Sirenia 
Software, and before that as director of Product Development for Her Interactive, where she 
began her research into females and computer games. She began her career at Origin Systems as 
a writer and designer on the ULTIMA PC series Roundtable: Forward: A Working Session for 
Women in Game Development See page j$ 

Jason Graves 

Jason Graves is a successful composer and sound designer at Rednote Audio, a premiere source 
for music and sound design that provides award-winning audio for major corporations world- 
wide including Vivendi Universal, Walt Disney Pictures, Warner Bros., Lucasfilm, Paramount 
Studios. Electronic Arts, Sierra Entertainment, and Nintendo. He is a graduate of the University of 
Southern California's prestigious film scoring program, and was given the rare opportunity to 
study under film composers Elmer Bernstein (The Ten Commandments, The Magnificent Seven), 
Christopher Young (Wonder Boys, The Shipping News), and Disney Legend Buddy Baker (Winnie 
the Pooh, The Fox and the Hound). Jason has composed music for national and international com- 
mercials (Honda, Toyota, Walt Disney, Activision). television shows (FOX, FOX Family, The 
Discovery Channel, and The Learning Channel), movie trailers (Hollywood Pictures, Gramercy 
Pictures), and feature films (Sony Pictures, Paramount Studios). Jason joined the Rednote Audio 
team in 2003 and is Rednote Audio's lead orchestrator. His game credits include The Hobbit for 
Vivendi Universal/Sierra and The Sims Bustin' Out for Maxis/EA Panel: The Hobbit: A Case Study 
See page 44 

Simon Green 

Simon Green is a senior software engineer in the technical developer relations group at Nvidia 
There he spends his days pondering the future of 3D graphics, and why all Americans think he is 
Australian Tutorial: (340) Advanced OpenGL Tutorial See page 3s. Lecture: Real-Time Translucent 
Animated Objects See page 103 

Susie Green 

Susie Green is a Senior Artist with Team Soho, Sony Computer Entertainment Europe. Susie has 
spent the last three years on The Getaway, working both on interior levels and recreating the 
streets of London. Her last year on the project was devoted to streamlining, optimization and 
general trickery to help the game to run smoothly. She has an Mphil in 3D computer graphics, 
and a first in photography, both from Glasgow School of Art. She spends her spare time trying to 
program Lecture: Creating Water and Fluid Effects For Videogames See page 112 

Daniel Greenberg 

Daniel Greenberg is a game designer, scriptwriter, and voice director. He serves as creative direc- 
tor for Vivendi Universal Game's videogames based on The Lord of the Rings, including Middle- 
Earth Online. He has developed games and scripts for properties like Star Wars, Star Trek, X- 



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SPEAKER BIOS 



Men, Dungeons and Dragons, Vampire: The Masquerade, 
and many more. His games have sold millions of copies and 
won numerous awards. Critics have called his games "...an 
atmospheric triumph,"". ..complex and elegant, ""...an epic RPC 
in the best sense of the word," and "one of the most absorb- 
ing and evocative experiences we've had on the Playstation 
this year." Reviewers have praised his scripts for "...beautiful, 
strong story elements," "...a heart-wrenching storyline," and 
"...sheer beauty and shining quality." saying "the multi- 
pronged story is a masterpiece." Daniel has designed educa- 
tional videogames to help develop critical thinking skills, and 
lectured educators on harnessing the educational power of 
games Roundtable: Violent Videogames: Threat or Menace? 
See page So 

Chris Grigg 

Chris Grigg of Control-G has been a consultant to Lucasarts, 
Sega (GEMS system), Microsoft (Windows 3 Multimedia 
Extensions), Hasbro Interactive, Play-Doh Island. EA, Skate or 
Die.XuIu Enertainment.as well as many others. Chris was a 
Music and Sound Director. Epyx 1985-1992 Architect, Epyx 
Sound Programming Language (SPL) Film Sound Editor, 1993- 
1995 Senior Sound Designer, Pixar Interactive, 1995-1997 
Technical Publications, PGP, 1997 Standards, Beatnik, 1997-pres- 
ent Member. Chris was also a member of Negativland from 
1978 to 1996 Lecture: Cross-Platform Audio Using Interactive 
XMF See page 43, Panel: The State of Non-Linear Audio for 
Interactive Media See page 46 

Jeff Grills 

Jeff Grills of Sony Online Entertainment has been in the 
videogame industry for more than 10 years, during which he 
has shipped titles for a number of different companies. He 
started writing games for Windows as early as Windows 95, 
and has experience with every version of DirectX and 
Direct3D. Most recently, he worked as the technical director 
and core graphics engine programmer on Star Wars 
Galaxies: An Empire Divided, a MMORPG using DirectX 9 
technology Tutorial: (337) Advanced Visual Effects with 
Direct3D See page 33 

Leonard Grossi 

Leonard Grossi in April of 2002, assisted in establishing the 
video game department within the Endeavor Agency. The 
department translates games to film, brings film and televi- 
sion talent to games and assists studios in maximizing the 
value of their intellectual property. From 1998 to 2002, 
Leonard was the director of recruiting for Interactive Source 
Inc. Clients included Insomniac Games, Oddworld Inhabitants, 
Suckerpunch Productions, Lucas Arts Entertainment, Midway 
Games, and others. Prior to 1998 Leonard attended the 
University of San Diego and graduated with a Bachelors 
degree in Business Economics Panel: Interfacing With 
Hollywood: Challenges and Opportunties See page 53 

James Gwertzman 

James Gwertzman has first-hand experience with the chal- 
lenges of building a game studio. In August 2000 he founded 
Escape Factory, a startup game studio that he and his co- 
founder Ed Allard built up to a peak of 25 employees before 
closing the studio in July 2003. James is currently one of the 
partners at Sprout Games, LLC, an independent studio focused 
on building casual games for digital distribution. James loves 
the game industry because of its continuous challenge to 
push the limits of technology while at the same time inte- 
graung so many other fascinating disciplines such as architec- 
ture, sociology, psychology, music, animation, acting, film, his- 
tory, writing, Al, physics, lighting, physics, etc. Formerly James 
lived in Tokyo for two years, as the online marketing manager 
in Asia for Microsoft. Prior to that he spent three years in 
Redmond where he played a broad leadership role helping 
design and build several of Microsoft's Internet server prod 
ucts. Lecture: What to Do When it All Goes to Hell: Lessons 
Learned Shutting Down a Game Studio See page 57 

Garner Halloran 

Garner Halloran is a Software Engineer at Red Storm 
Entertainment. His main responsibility since joining Red 
Storm has been to work on the user interface for many of its 
titles. This has enabled him to provide a user interface library 
that is being used throughout the company for the PC, Xbox, 
and Playstation 2. Garner's seven-year career has netted seven 
credits including Tom Clancv's Rainbox Six, Shadow Watch. 
and Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Roundtable: User Interface 
Design See page 70 



Wolfgang Haniann 

Wolfgang Hamann has had an extensive career in the enter- 
tainment industry. Wolfgang is currently a game team project 
manager and head of the audio department at Radical 
Entertainment, having worked on such games as Simpsons 
Road Rage, Simpsons Hit and Run, The Hulk, CSI, Dark 
Summit, Monsters Inc., and Dark Angel. His past experiences 
as an EMI published songwriter, intellectual property consult- 
ant, audio producer/engineer, personal manager, and owner 
of Merlin Productions and Zauber Music Publishing have 
given him unique insights into the intricacies of the enter- 
tainment industry from all aspects including creative, techni- 
cal, legal, and business. He has also been a part time college 
instructor for more than 20 years and currently teaches a 
Business Management for Games course in Vancouver, 
Canada. He received his B. A. from the University of Windsor, 
Ontario, and attended post-graduate studies at the University 
of British Columbia Tutorial: (336) Goodbye Postmortems, 
Hello Critical Stage Analysis See page 32 

Jonathan Hamel 

Tutorial: (353) Game Tuning Workshop See page 37 

Shawn Hargreaves 

Shawn Hargreaves has been in the games industry for seven 
years, most recently as lead programmer and team lead on 
Climax's MotoGP racer. After shipping the original offline ver- 
sion, this was upgraded to support Xbox Live in a near-impos- 
sible seven-week sprint, and has since won numerous awards 
for the quality of the online implementation Lecture: The 
Easy Route To Console Online See page 84; Tutorial: (337) 
Advanced Visual Effects with Direct3D See page 33 

Mark Harris 

Tutorial: {340) Advanced OpenGL Tutorial See page 35 

Peter Harrison 

Peter Harrison graduated from the University of Sussex with a 
degree in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence. Some 
time spent working in the world of business computing per- 
suaded him that there was more fun to be had by developing 
his passions for audio and gaming. After completing his 
Masters degree in Music Technology at Keele University, Peter 
joined Creative Labs' Developer Relations department. Today 
he contributes to the development and promotion of gam- 
ing's number one environmental audio solution, EAX. He's in 
touch with game developers all over Europe, helping to 
ensure that their projects take full advantage of the advanced 
3D sound technology available on Creative's market-leading 
audio products Sponsored Session: Interactive 3D Audio the 
Easy Way: The ISACT Experience See page 45 

David Hart 

David Hart is an effects developer and shader writer for 
PDI/Dreamworks, currently in production on PDI's upcoming 
film Madagascar. David is a co-author of PDI's hair interpola- 
tion, clumping, and shading pipeline. He has presented 
research on shadowing and production shader writing at 
Siggraph, and published in the areas of shading, volume ren- 
dering, and mathematics for scientific visualization. Prior to 
joining PDI/Dreamworks, David was a researcher at the 
University of Utah. He holds a Master of Science from the 
Program of Computer Graphics at Cornell University Lecture: 
Procedural Shaders: A Feature Animation Perspective See page 
104 

Evan Hart 

Evan Hart is a OpenGL programmer and evangelist for ATI. 
Evan works with developers to optimize their use of the API 
He also works to design new OpenGL extensions to enable 
new capabilities for developers. In his five years at ATI. Evan 
has worked with everything from games to workstations and 
from drivers to demos Tutorial: (340) Advanced OpenGL 
Tutorial See page 35 

Ryoichi Hasegawa 

Ryoichi Hasegawa of Sony Computer Entertainment began his 
career at Sega Enterprises in Japan in 1992, localizing games 
both from Japanese to English and English to Japanese. At 
Sega he worked on more than 35 titles, including Ecco the 
Dolphin and Power Rangers for Genesis and Game Gear, 
Night Trap for Sega CD, Virtua Racing Deluxe for the 32X, 
Nights for Saturn, and House of the Dead 2 and Daytona 
USA 2 for the arcade. In 1998 he joined Sony Computer 
Entertainment Inc, where as assistant producer, he has con- 
tributed to the development of Crash: Warped, Crash Team 
Racing, Crash Bash, Spyro the Dragon 1 and 2, Jak and 
Daxter. Formula One 2001, and Sly Cooper and the Theivius 



Raccoonus Lecture: A Peek Behind the Shoji: Japan's 
Videogame Market Today See page 67 

Demis Hassabis 

Demis Hassabis broke into the industry at the age of seven- 
teen when he co-created the original Theme Park (EA) with 
Peter Molyneux at Bullfrog in 1994. After attaining a Double 
First Class Honours degree in Computer Science from 
Cambridge University he joined the newly formed Lionhead 
Studios working as a senior programmer on Black & White 
until his departure in early 1998 to found Elixir Studios.. 
Demis was executive designer on Elixir's first game Republic: 
The Revolution and currently on Elixir's recently announced 
second game Evil Genius. He is also actively involved in the 
company's R&D. Republic: The Revolution, published by Eidos, 
and has won many prestigious awards including IGN's Most 
Innovative Design and Gamespy's Best Strategy Game at E3 
2002. Evil Genius was announced at E3 2003 and received 
numerous Industry Awards including IGN's Most Innovative 
Design read (to be released by VU Games Autumn 2004). 
Lecture: Republic: Lessons Learned See page 8y, Panel: 
Starting a New Studio See page 56 

Chris Hecker 

See Advisory Board page 13 Lecture: Lemke's Algorithm, the 
Hammer In Your Math Toolbox? See page 100 

Chris Hegstrom 

Christopher Hegstrom is a Sound Designer for Stormfront 
Studios. He has done audio for interactive entertainment for 
eight years, full time for six. His last shipped project was Lord 
of the Rings The Two Towers. Before that Chris did sound for 
BLOOOWAKE.a boat action title for the Xbox. Previous to join- 
ing Stormfront, Chris lived in Boston and did audio for a chil- 
dren's ISP called Juniornet. There he was responsible for 
music, voice and sound effects for various on-line and CDROM 
games and activities. Before Juniornet, Chris did live sound 
engineering for Blue Man Group in Boston, New York and 
Chicago. While at Blue Man, Chris did a variety of collaborative 
work with the artists and musicians including remixing, mas- 
tering, composing, voice and sound effect design. Chris 
majored in Music Synthesis at Berklee College of Music and 
studied multimedia design and programming at Harvard 
University Panel: Sound Design: Strategies for Success See 
page 46 

Edmond A. Heinbockel 

Edmond A. Heinbockel is a software industry veteran with 
over 18 years of experience, having served as CFO/Controller 
for Sierra On-Line prior to, during, and after its IPO; He is now 
the co-founder of Visual Purple, a recognized leader in Level IV 
Simulation-Based Training. Visual Purple's clients include the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Defense, the 
Intelligence Community and USDA Tutorial: Serious Games 
Summit See page 31 

Guido Henkel 

Guido Henkel of G3 Studios is a veteran of the game's indus- 
try for 18 years, and the acclaimed producer of many award- 
winning computer game classics, including The Realms of 
Arkania series, Advanced Dungeons and Dragons, 
Planetscape Torment, and many others. Starting in the com- 
puter games industry in 1985, Guido has been the co-CEO of 
Attic Entertainment Software, where he oversaw develop- 
ment, marketing, sales, distribution, licensing, and public rela- 
tions, while making the company one of Germany's leading 
computer game enterprises. After leaving Attic in 1997, he was 
senior producer and project director at Interplay Productions' 
Black Isle Studios division, where he oversaw the development 
of the multiple award-winning role-playing epic Planetscape: 
Torment. Guido was then VP of Product Development for 
eMusement, a now-defunct start up company that worked on 
a massively multiplayer PRG for Tokyo-based Squaresoft 
before founding his own company, G3 Studios, in 2001, pio- 
neering the emerging mobile market Lecture: Game Mobility 
Requires Code Portability See page 98 

Stefan Henry-Biskup 

Stefan Henry-Biskupof Liquid Development has been working 
in games for the last 12 years. Stefan cut his teeth in nearly all 
phases of game art production at the early NTG/3DO then 
moved to Accolade, later Infogrames. Titles worked on includ- 
ed Escape from Monster Manor, Killing Time, and Slave 
Zero. He then created Lighthouse Studios specializing in char- 
acter modeling and rigging. Lighthouse projects included 
Brute Force (Digital Anvil/Microsoft) and Deus Ex 2:Invisible 
War (Ion Storm/Eidos). Creating many of the character mod- 



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SPEAKER BIOS 



els for Enter the Matrix (Shiny Entertainment) introduced him to Liquid Development, where he 
soon became a senior partner and art manager As artist and art manager, Stefan is responsible 
for, among other projects, the character and creature model production for Ultima X Odyssey 
coming from Origin and EA. Liquid Development has worked on titles for Origin systems, Shiny 
Entertainment, Microsoft, EA, Irrational Games, Digital Extremes, and Wild Tangent, among oth- 
ers Lecture: Producing the Characters and Creatures of Ultima X Odyssey See page 115 

JC Herz 

J-C. Herz (jc@joysticknation.com) is the principal of Joystick Nation Inc., a research and design 
practice that specializes in networked interaction design and social architecture for multiplayer 
systems such as online games, learning systems, and collaborative environments. Clients include 
multinational corporations in the media/entertainment, consumer electronics and finance sec- 
tors, nonprofit foundations and the U.S. Department of Defense Tutorial: Serious Games Summit 
See page 31 

Paul Heydon 

Paul Heydon is currently the Head of Interactive Entertainment at Commerzbank Securities 
where advises video game companies on fundraising and mergers & acquisitions. Paul is based 
in London, England, and has global responsibility for the interactive entertainment sector. Paul 
joined the media team at Commerzbank in May 2001 from the media team at ING Barings 
where he worked for two years. Paul and his team have helped interactive entertainment com- 
panies in Europe, Asia, and the U.S. to raise over $i.4bn to date. Paul earned a Master's degree in 
Business Administration in 1999 and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Honors Business 
Administration in 1990, both from the Ivey School of Business at the University of Western 
Ontario, which is located in London, Canada Roundtable: You Have Built a Successful Game 
Development Business: Now How do You Sell It? See page 58 

Garin Hiebert 

Garin Hiebert currently is a programmer at Creative Labs, Inc., where he works on a variety of 
projects. He has contributed to the audio code of several games and has been an active contribu- 
tor to OpenAL He continues to work on Macintosh and Windows OpenAL code, cross-platform 
testing code, and OpenAL documentation Sponsored Session: OpenAL Everywhere See page 45 

Rustle Hill 

Tutorial: (350) The Art of Modeling and Animating Triple A Titles in Maya See page 34 

Randy Hinrichs 

Randy Hinrichs is a graduate of the University of California at Los Angeles, and runs the Learning 
Science and Technology research group in Microsoft Research. He is responsible for researching 
next generation learning environments, extending learning from K-12 through universities and 
into workforce lifelong learning. An author of numerous articles on intranet strategies, he is a 
member on the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. IEEE Learning Task Force, 
and the iNEER Board Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 31 

Charles Hirschorn 

Panel: Interfacing with Hollywood: Challenges and Opportunities See page 33 

Clint Hocking 

Clint Hocking of Ubisoft Divertissements along with writer/director J.T. Petty, was the first ever 
winner of the Game Developers Choice Award for Excellence in Scriptwritingfor his work on Tom 
Clancy's Splinter Cell. With a B.F.A. in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia, 
Clint is struggling to find the time to complete his Master's thesis, finish an ongoing indepen- 
dant film project, and change forever the way human beings understand storytelling. Having 
held a stupendous variety of jobs from counting bolts to writing web content for children and 
for gigantic financial consultancies, Clint has finally found the best job in the world. In his spare 
time. Clint likes to come to work anyway, or walk his dog with his fiance Lecture: The Interesting 
Thing About Bishops: Simulation Boundaries in Splinter Cell See page 63 

Elaine Hodgson 

See page 14 for bio. Lecture: Everything You Need to Know to Make Money in Coin-Op See page 51 

Naty Hoffman 

Naty Hoffman in a previous life was the architect for Intel's first MMX microprocessor and 
helped define the SSE and SSE 2 instruction set extensions. More recently, he was lead graphics 
programmer on Earth & Beyond at Westwood Studios. Currently he works on graphics technolo- 
gy at Naughty Dog. Naty has published in Gome Programming Gems 3, Graphics Programming 
Methods, and Game Developer magazine and has lectured at GDC and SIGGRAPH Lecture: 
Advanced Real-Time Reflectance See page 92 

Rick Holtrop 

Rick Holtrop of NCsoft was born in Chicago, Illinois. Rick moved to Texas in 1996 and began work- 
ing for Origin Systems in Customer Support and Quality Assurance. He is in his third year of 
design and programming. Rick's past projects included Privateer 2, Ultima Online, Ultima 9, and 
Ultima Online 2 (cancelled). He is currently working on Tabula Rasa, a massively multiplayer 
RPG from Richard Garriott Lecture: Master Your Game's Domain: Data-Driven Asset 
Management See page 83 

Ed Hooks 

Ed Hooks is the author of Acting for Animators (Heinemann, revised 2nd edition, 2003). He has 
been a theatre professional for three decades and teaches acting to both animators and actors. 
He has taught for many companies, including PDI, Lucas Learning, Microsoft (FASA STUDIO Xbox), 
Disney Animation (Orlando, Florida and Sydney, Australia), Will Vinton Studios, Valve, Midway 
Games, Big Idea, Bioware, Tippett Studio, Wild Brain, Oddworld Inhabitants, Mondo Media, 
Dynamix, and Crystal Dynamics. In addition, he has been a guest instructor at Ringling School of 
Art and Design (Sarasota, Florida), Nanyang Polytechnic Institute in Singapore, Filmakademie 
Baden-Wurttemberg in Ludwigsburg Germany and HFF in Potsdam. He was a featured speaker 



at Animex 2001 and 2002 at the University of Teesside in England, at FMX '99 and '02 in 
Stuttgart and SAND/2003 in Swansea, Wales. You can learn more about Ed's work by visiting his 
web sites, www.ActingForAnimators.com and www.edhooks.com Lecture: Acting for Animators 
See page m 

John Hopson 

John Hopson is a graduate of Reed College and has a Ph.D. in psychology from Duke University. 
John is currently employed at Microsoft Games Studios User Testing group Lecture: Behavioral 
Game Design See page 60 

Andrew House 

See page 11 for bio Keynote: Encouraging Innovation in Game Development See page n 

Alan Howarth 

Alan Howarth's electronic imagination has contributed to some of the biggest genre films of the 
'80s, from scores to special sound effects, from Halloween stalkers to Star Trek. Alternately wear- 
ing the hats of both composer and sound effectsman, Alan has collaborated with John Carpenter 
on the music from nearly all of his movies starting with Escape From New York; he's provided 
sound design and effects for Poltergeist, Raiders of the Lost Ark, all the Star Trek movies, The Hunt 
for Red October, Coppola's Dracula, Total Recall, and Stargate. among others. As a composer, he's 
scored all or part of all the Halloween films, composed music for Retribution, The Dentist, and 
others. Alan recently served as the chief audio officer for the game giant Electronic Arts. 
Currently he is providing independent music and sound contracting for a number of titles. Panel: 
Mixing and Mastering Music and Sound for Games See page 4s 

Hank Howie 

Hank Howie is the president of Blue Fang Games, developer of Zoo Tycoon, Dinosaur Digs, and 
Marine Mania for the PC He has been involved in the game industry since 1989, when he joined 
Spinnaker Software as project manager on Riders of Rohan, a game based on The Lord of the 
Rings. Tutorial: (346) Human Resources Forum: Trends and Directions See page 33, Panel: IGDA 
Quality of Life White Paper Unveiling See page 76 

Andrew Shane Huang 

Andrew Shane Huang is a computer architecture expert who holds a Ph.D. from MIT in Electrical 
Engineering and Computer Science. His interests include all aspects of moving information 
between processors. Andrew considers videogame hacking to be one of his hobbies, and, in addi- 
tion to writing Hacking the Xbox. An Introduction to Reverse Engineering, admits to having con- 
ducted previous experimentation on the Gamecube and Dreamcast consoles Sponsored Session: 
The Security Bottom Line See page 106 

Richard Huddy 

Richard Huddy is the president and CEO of The Code Mafia, a new company that offers its 
graphics expertise to the games industry on a consultancy basis. The Code Mafia's principal cus- 
tomer is ATI, the PC industry's leading graphics chip company. He has worked in the computer 
games industry for more than 14 years and for most of that time has specialized in high-per- 
formance 3D graphics. He worked with both Rendermorphics and Criterion Software, developing 
their low-level APIs before moving on to work as a device driver writer specializing in Direct3D 
optimization. Richard's primary focus is now teaching game programmers how to get the best 
from modern high-performance architectures using Direct3D. Richard is a regular contributor at 
Microsoft's Meltdown conferences and teaches at the annual GDC and Creativity events. He lives 
in England and is proud of that fact Tutorial: (337) Advanced Visual Effects with Direct3D5ee 
page 33 

Casey Hudson 

Casey Hudson, as producer/project director of Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, led a 
development team of more than 70 people to create one of the fastest selling and most critically 
acclaimed role-playing games of all time. Casey started his career in interactive entertainment as 
a technical artist at Bioware, doing character modeling and game design prototyping for 
Neverwinter Nights. On MDK2, Casey contributed level art and animation work, as well as game 
scripting and utility programming. Prior to joining Bioware, Casey earned a degree in Mechanical 
Engineering, and was a self-taught programmer and 3D artist. Casey is now the producer/ proj- 
ect director on a currently unannounced project at Bioware. Lecture: Creating a Monster RPG: 
The Light and the Dark Sides of Development on Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic See 
page 83 

Rob Huebner 

Robert Huebner is a co-founder of Nihilistic Software, a small development team located in 
Marin County, California. Robert's previous work includes Jedi Knight: Dark Forces 2 from 
Lucasarts, Descent from Parallax Software, and contributions to Starcraft by Blizzard 
Entertainment. Nihilistic's first title, Vampire: The Masquerade - Redemption was a top-10 seller 
when released in March, 2000. Robert is Nihilistic's director of technology, creating new engines 
and tools for Nihilistic's next project, being developed for next-generation console systems. 
Panel: Starting a New Studio See page 36, Tutorial: (351) Developer Business Summit: An IGDA 
Think-Tank See page 31 

Robin Hunicke 

Robin Hunicke is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Computer Science Department at Northwestern 
University. A joint member of the Robotics and Interactive Entertainment groups, she studies Al 
and videogames. In addition to her academic work, Robin works extensively with the IGDA 
Education Committee to help facilitate communication and collaboration between academic 
researchers and the game development community Panel: Towards Relevant Research: 
Collaboration 101 See page 79, Tutorial: (353) Game Tuning Worshop See page 31 

Katherine Isbister 

Katherine Isbister teaches a course at Stanford University on the design of characters for 
videogames. She received her Ph.D. from Stanford, with a focus on using ideas from social psy 
chology to design better, more effective interactive characters. Isbister's work has been present- 







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SPEAKER BIOS 



ed at CHI, Agents, and other conferences around the world. 
She has published work in a wide variety of venues, and has 
given talks at research and academic venues including Sony 
Research labs in Japan, Banff Centre in Canada, U.C. Berkeley, 
CCAC, and others- Isbister is currently writing a book for 
Morgan Kaufmann entitled: Designing Came Characters with 
Social Skills Lecture: 10 Tricks from Psychology for Making 
Better Characters See page yo 

Pete Isensee 

Pete Isensee has been programming in the game industry for 
ten years. Pete's shipped titles ranging from adventure stories 
to casual online games, working on platforms ranging from 
PCs to Macs to Xbox. He's currently a lead engineer with the 
Xbox Advanced Technology Croup. He has a degree in com- 
puter engineering and was a C++ template geek long before 
compilers knew what to make of functors and traits. Lecture: 
Common C++ Performance Mistakes in Cames See page 96 

Michael Isner 

Michael Isner, as Softimage Special Projects Lead for the North 
American west coast, is best known for his invention of using 
quaternions to solve spine problems and reduce counter ani- 
mation. The spine research has since grown into the features 
found in the Character menu in XSI, as well as a further range 
of research aimed at combating complex rotation and inter- 
face problems that slow down character animation. Michael 
has participated in seminars and panels worldwide and con- 
tinues to be an enthusiast and friend of the film and game 
industry on the west coast and in Japan. More information 
can be found at wwwisner.com Sponsored Session: Creating 
Characters, Models and Environments for Half-Life 2. See 
page 61 

Tbru Iwatani 

Toru Iwatani joined Namco Limited in 1977 and took charge of 
the game and visual design of 1980s industry-defining title 
Pac-Man. Since then, he has produced more than 50 arcade 
and videogame titles, such as Point Blank, Alpine Racer, and 
Time Crisis Lecture: The Secret of Pac-Man's Success: Making 
Fun First See page 68 

Lee Jaeobson 

Lee Jaeobson of Midway never quite grew up as a kid, pro- 
gramming his first videogame at the age of 16 on his Atari 
400 computer (he couldn't afford the 800 model) between all 
night marathon sessions of Ultima and Wizardry. In 1988, he 
co-founded one of the first interactive media-based advertis- 
ing companies in Dallas, TX, which was acquired in 1990. He 
then headed west to manage business development at Virgin 
Interactive Entertainment/Viacom in Irvine, California, and 
later joined Midway Games, Inc. where he serves as vice presi- 
dent of Business Development and Acquisitions. During a 
career that spans more than fifteen years in the entertain- 
ment industry, he manages product / business development, 
acquisitions, domestic / international licensing and strategic 
planning for Midway Panel: The Negotiation See page 54 

Greg James 

Greg James of Nvidia grew up in a house where computers 
and movies with 3D rendering were left unlocked and out in 
plain sight. It's no wonder that Greg became addicted to 
graphics at an early age Attempts to cure him with 
respectable math and science have all failed, but fortunately 
he's found a safe, positive environment with the community 
outreach program at Nvidia. There, he's able to help other 
graphics addicts work through their afflictions, and their work 
together has appeared in many games and publications about 
graphics and physics. Greg also strives to bring pixel pushers 
in from the street, and set them to doing good through Nvidia 
and other organizations. Lecture: Real-time Translucent 
Animated Objects See page 105 

Karl Jeffery 

Karl Jeffery, Climax Group CEO, started out in the industry as a 
freelance videogames programmer in 1987, developing games 
on Spectrum, Amstrad, and Sega console platforms for small 
U.K. publishing houses, in what was a new emerging market- 
place. With a focus on developing and acquiring both cutting 
edge technical expertise and also superior management skills, 
Climax has since grown steadily and profitably over the years. 
Climax now has the following studios: LA, Portables, Brighton, 
Nottingham London, and Solent Tutorial: (351) Developer 
Business Summit: An IGDAThink-Tank See page 31 



Sean P. Jenkin 

Sean Jenkin completed his Bachelor of Computer Science at 
the University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia, in 1999, during 
which time he worked full time as a programmer developing 
custom software for companies such as the Australian Stock 
Exchange. Brought to the U.S. to work at Microsoft, he has 
helped to deliver Windows ME, DirectX 8.1, and games such as 
Tao Feng and Rise of Nations. He now works as a lead soft- 
ware design engineer in Test at Microsoft Game Studios, lead- 
ing development on automation systems, testing tools, and 
working on games from Rare and Lionhead Studios Tutorial: 
(342) Test Automation in Game Development See page 33 

Dr. Henry Jenkins 

Henry Jenkins, the John E. Burchard Professor of Humanities 
and Director of MIT Comparative Media Studies, has spent his 
career studyng media and how people incorporate it into 
their lives. He is a founder and key researcher on The 
Education Arcade (www.educationarcade org), a researcher 
coalition committed to promoting the pedagogical use of 
computer and video games. Jenkins earned his doctorate in 
communication arts (University of Wisconsin) and a master's 
in communication studies (University of Iowa) Tutorial: 
Serious Games Summit See page 31 

Darren Jobling 

Darren Jobling, 36, is director of Business Development at 
Eutechnyx, the specialist driving-game developer based in the 
U.K. Darren has been working at Eutechnyx since 1990, and 
during this time has successfully concluded development 
deals with some of the biggest names in the industry, such as 
Electronic Arts, Eidos, and Atari, creating games based on the 
world's leading IP, such as Formula 1 and James Bond 007. 
These deals have led to Eutechnyx obtaining National and 
European awards for company growth, such as the Sunday 
Times Tech Track 100 — making Eutechnyx one of the top 100 
growth technology companies in the U.K. Darren was also 
responsible for Eutechnyx being the only developer to have 
been awarded Investor in People status, a U.K. recognised HR 
standard of excellence. Lecture: The l-Spy Book of Developer 
Contract Law See page 32 

Jeff Johnson 

Jeff Johnson is lead engineer of Turbine Entertainment 
Software's World Graphics team, which is responsible for 
client/server physics, animation, graphics, and related tech- 
nologies in Turbine's games. He has worked on three different 
massively multiplayer titles: Dungeons & Dragons Online, 
Middle-Earth Online, and Asheron's Call 2. He holds a B.S.E. 
in Computer Science with high honors from Princeton 
University Roundtable: Massively Multiplayer Engineering See 
page >o> 

Soren Johnson 

Soren Johnson of Firaxis Games spent his formative years 
playing games like Adventure Construction Set, Seven Cities 
of Gold, and Lords of Conquest on his family's state-of-the- 
art Commodore 64. Many years later, he graduated from 
Stanford University with a B.A. in History and a M.S. in 
Computer Science, focusing on adaptive algorithms and 
human-computer interaction. After working as an intern at 
Electronic Arts (Redwood Shores), he moved to Baltimore in 
2000 to join Firaxis Games. While working as co-designer and 
lead programmer on Civilization III, he also authored the 
game's Al. Soren is currently working as the project lead on 
one of Firaxis's unannounced projects Lecture: The 
Civilization Series: How to Maintain a Successful Franchise 
See page 61 

Gerard Jones 

Gerald Jones, as a creator of pop culture, has written for such 
comic-book icons as Spider-Man, Batman, and Justice League. 
He has helped adapt many Japanese comic franchises to the 
American market, including Dragon Ball and DiGiCharat, and 
is the only American to have written Pokemon stories. His 
own creations (eg, Ultraforce, Prime, Trouble with Girls, 
Haunted Man) have been developed into cartoons, comics, 
toys, webtoons, feature films in development, and a video 
game. Gerard's latest book is Killing Monsters: Why Children 
Need Fantasy. Super Heroes, and Make-Believe Violence (Basic 
Books). He has written for many publications (eg, Harper's, 
New York Times) and often speaks on games and culture. He 
created the Art & Story Workshops for young people, a source 
of much of his understanding of how kids use their culture 
With other child advocates and media scholars he co-founded 
Media Power for Children, an organization devoted to better 



understanding and utilizing the power of entertainment. 
Lecture: The Heart of the Hero See page 65 

Kenji Kaido 

Kenji Kaido of Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. is the pro- 
ducer of ICO. Kenji started his career at Taito in 1987, where he 
worked on the arcade titles Bonz Adventure, Night Striker, 
Champion Wrestler, Cameltry, Sonic Blast Man, and 
Warrior Blade as project leader and lead game designer. At 
Taito he shifted to the department to work on Home Karaoke 
Console, X55 from starting up the project. As a project leader 
he worked the online game delivery system and developed 
Cleopatra Fortune. In 1997, Kenji joined Sony Computer 
Entertainment Inc. As a first role in Sony Computer 
Entertainment, he worked on APE ESCAPE as a lead game 
designer and associate producer. As a producer Kenji devel- 
oped ICO with Fumito Lecture: Game Design Method of ICO 
See page 64 

Masaki Kawase 

Lecture: Practical Implementation of High Dynamic Range 

Rendering See page 103 

Heather Kelley 

Heather Kelley is a designer on Thief 3 at Ion Storm, Austin, 
and is co-chair of the Women in Game Development commit- 
tee. Prior to joining Ion Storm, she was a producer-pesigner at 
Human Code, producing the award-winning Redbeard's 
Pirate Quest, among other titles Panel: State of the Art: 
Anatomy of 3D Level Design See page 6g 

Alison Kelly 

Alison Kelly, at the age of 16, had already achieved business 
success with the launch of her production and booking 
agency. This began her career as an A&R agent for London 
Records. A highly respected agent, Alison helped launch the 
careers of many platinum artists. An entrepreneur at heart, 
Alison left London Records in 1999 to start a production com- 
pany that infused music and technology, and with the help 
from sponsor Daily Radar, the Sapphire Party became one of 
the launch sites for the Sony PlayStation 2. With marketing 
savvy, Alison landed features in prominent media outlets such 
as URB, Mixer Magazine, the New York Times, Entertainment 
Weekly, Dateline, and MTV. Alison co-founded a student IGDA 
chapter that has more than two hundred members and has 
netted corporate sponsorship, a change in curriculum, and 
attention from industry veterans Panel: Industry & 
Government: Working Together See page 53; Group Gathering: 
Students' Group Gathering See page 79 

Shawn Kendall 

Shawn Kendall has developed cutting edge Java- and Java3D- 
based game technology demos for Full Sail and Sun 
Microsystems, displayed at various conferences such as GDC 
and SIGGRAPH three years running. In 2002, Shawn founded 
Immediate Mode Interactive, LLC, a game technology compa- 
ny dedicated to the use of Java in games. Shawn has been 
developing in Java since 1995, starting on JDK 1.0 on SGIs 
machines, and in Java3D since 1998. Before Java, Shawn was 
developing in C/C++ and demonstrated Virtual Reality game 
projects with a group called the Toy Scouts, associated with 
University of Central Florida's Institute for Simulation and 
Training at the 1994 and 1995 SIGGRAPH. Shawn graduated 
from UCF in 1995 with a B.S. in Liberal Science and is conclud 
ing a Computer Science B.S. this year. Shawn maintains several 
Java3D content loaders, as well as a host of Java3D game 
demos projects Tutorial: (343) Professional Java Game 
Development Techniques See page 35 

Scott Kim 

Scott Kim designs puzzles magazines, physical toys, computer 
games, and the web. Major works include the computer 
games Heaven & Earth, Obsidian, and Scott Kim's Puzzle 
Box on the JuniorNet kid's online service. He also contributed 
to Jeopardy! Online, The NextTetris, Poppit, and Collapsei. 
He writes a monthly puzzle page for Discover magazine, and is 
the author of the book Inversions. His award-winning puzzle 
toy Railroad Rush Hour is sold by Think Fun. He is currently 
developing daily puzzles for the web and mobile phones For 
more information, see www.scottkim.com. Tutorial: (334) 
Casual Games Summit See page 34 

Andrew Kimball 

Andrew Kimball is the CEO of QBInternational, a leading 
developer of online training games and simulations. He is the 
principle architect of the Interactive OBook Platform, a net- 



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SPEAKER BIOS 



work of web-based authoring tools for creating effective, engaging, online learning games rapid- 
ly and inexpensively. OBInternational produces a wide variety of custom game-based eLearning 
for such clients as Agilent, Oracle. Cadence, Pfizer, HP, Analog Devices, The State of California, the 
US Navy, and San Diego School District Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 31 

Neil Kirby 

Neil Kirby is a Member of Technical Staff at Bell Laboratories. His assignments have included 
exploring .NET solutions, building speech recognition software, and teaching at the university 
level. Some of his work was mentioned in a recent Bell Labs Technical Journal. Neil holds a 
Masters degree in Computer Science from The Ohio State University, where he gives guest lec- 
tures to the Freshman Engineering Honors program. He is currently developing a web-based ver- 
sion of Star Fleet Battles. His prior multi-player, tactical combat computer games date back to 
1987. Neil has contributed articles to both Al Game Programming Wisdom I and //. Roundtable: Al 
in Computer Games Roundtables and Interactive Discussion See page 93 

Ian Klimon 

Ian Klimon joined Timegate Studios, Inc. in early 2001 as lead designer, serving in that role on the 
award-winning real-time strategy game Kohan: Ahriman's Gift. Prior to that, Ian spent seven 
years working intermittently in the industry on everything from sports simulations to text-based 
massively multiplayer roleplaying games in positions ranging from Producer to Designer to 
GameMaster to Quality Assurance. Ian earned his B.A. in Philosophy from Boston College, his 
M.A. in Ethics from the University of Baltimore, and his J.D. from the University of Baltimore 
School of Law. Ian is currently Design director at Timegate and leading the design teams for 
Timegate 's upcoming titles: Kohan. Kings of War, and AXIS & Allies RTS Lecture: Zoological 
Gardens: The Science of Creature Design See page J2 

Chris Klug 

Chris Klug of Electronic Arts is the lead content designer on Earth and Beyond. Westwood 
Studios' massive multiplayer online RPG. Chris has been a game designer for 21 years, starting his 
career with Simulations Publications, Inc., in 1981. While there, he designed Universe (a sci-fi role 
playing game). Draconouest (a fantasy RPG and winner of a Game of the Year Award), and 
Damocles Mission (a sci-fi strategy game). When TSR bought SPI in 1982, Chris and the rest of 
the R&D staff moved on to form Victory Games There Chris headed up the role playing games 
group, and designed the James Bond 007 role playing game (winner of a Game of the Year 
award). At Victory Games, Chris designed a dozen more titles and was, for a time, creative direc- 
tor. After leaving Victory Games, Chris became a freelance computer game designer and has 
worked for (among others) Segasoft, TSR, Hasbro, 3W, THO, Simon and Schuster Interactive, 
Target Games, and GT Interactive. Panel: Sci-Fi MMPs: Lessons from Galaxies and Earth & 
Beyond See page 68, Lecture: Storytelling in Earth & Beyond See page 6g. Lecture: The 
Emotional Heart of Art Direction See page v) 

Chris Kniffen 

Chris Kniffen has worked in the video game industry creating art and animation for the past six 
years. He has worked on console and PC titles for companies such as Nintendo. THO, Epic Games, 
LucasArts, and Atari. He is currently employed by San Francisco based Secret Level as technical 
animator, where he is responsible for character rigging and animation, and involved in designing 
and implementing the artists pipeline. Tutorial: (350) The Art of Modeling and Animating Triple 
A Titles in Maya See pags 34. Sponsored Session: Games & Film Animation: Still Worlds Apart? 
See page 113 

Vangelis Kokkevis 

Vangelis Kokkevis is a member of the Research and Development group at Sony Computer 
Entertainment America where he is working on physical simulation and character animation 
techniques for the current and next generation game consoles. He has a Bachelors of Science 
degree in Computer Science from Brown University and was a doctoral candidate at the 
University of Pennsylvania's Center for Human Modeling and Simulation where he received a 
Masters of Science in 1997. Prior to joining SCEA, Vangelis was a partner and lead engineer at 
Check Six Studios, an independent game development company. Before getting interested in 
video games technology, Vangelis worked for AliasjWavefront where he developed a number of 
modeling, deformation and dynamics tools for Maya Lecture: Practical Physics for Articulated 
Characters See page 103 

Raph Koster 

Raph Koster works at the Austin office of Sony Online Entertainment, and is the creative director 
for Star Wars Galaxies: An Empire Divided, the massively multiplayer game set in the Star Wars 
universe. Previously, he was the creative lead for Ultima Online and lead designer on Ultima 
Online: The Second Age. He writes and speaks frequently on issues of online world design, and 
maintains a web page that includes the canonical history of online worlds and the well-known 
Laws of Online World Design at www.legendmud.org/raph/gaming/ Tutorial: (335) Developing a 
Massively Multiplayer Game See page 35; Panel: Sci-Fi MMPs: Lessons from Galaxies and Earth 
& Beyond See page 68. Panel: Towards Relevant Research: Collaboration 101 See page yg-. Panel: 
Game Design Challenge: The Love Story See page 64 

Kirsi Kotilainen 

Kirsi Kotilainen heads global Developer Relations for Nokia's N-Gage gaming platform. Her focus 
is currently on defining and delivering an industry-leading developer offering - including tools, 
support and other services - to N-Gage developers in order to make game development easy and 
productive. Kirsi has been with Nokia since 1995, holding various product marketing and busi- 
ness development positions in different business areas of the company. She has been focusing 
on developer relations since 2000, when she first established a WAP developer community for 
Nokia in the Asia-Pacific region. Before moving to Finland in November 2003 to begin her current 
position, she was managing Forum Nokia developer community activities in Asia Pacific. Forum 
Nokia is Nokia's global developer program focusing on technology and business support for 
wireless game, enterprise and media developers. Kirsi holds a Masters of Science degree in 
Industrial Engineering and Management from Tampere University of Technology, Finland. 
Session: Developing Games for N-Gage See page 97 



Ray Kowalewski 

Ray Kowalewski is a member of the Games User-testing Group at Microsoft Game Studios, which 
uses psychological research methods to collect feedback that improves the usability and fun of 
the company's games. Since joining the group in 2000, Ray has worked on various PC and Xbox 
titles including Fusion Frenzy, MS Train Sims, Ash eron's Call 2, and Blinx: The Time Sweeper, to 
name a few, as well as headed up the group's efforts in testing with kids. His current projects 
include Fable and an unannounced MMORPG. Prior to working at Microsoft, Ray completed four 
years of postgraduate training in neuroscience and psychology at The Ohio State University, 
studying the impact of psychological and physiological factors on people's health. Tutorial: (331) 
Playtesting Strategies See page 32 

Erik Kraber 

See page xx for bio Keynote: Sound Design Methodology of Medal of Honor See page 41; Panel: 
Sound Design: Strategies for Success See page 46 

Dr. Paul Kruszewski 

Dr. Paul Kruszewski is a world-renowned and award-winning expert on computer graphics simu- 
lation with a deep knowledge of the computer graphics industry from work in Europe and 
Canada. He has developed commercial 3D tools that have already been used in both film and 
broadcast; he masterminded the 3D technology behind the MyVirtualModel e-commerce com- 
pany. As CTO, he has lead innovation at Artificial Mind and Movement (A2M), one of Montreal's 
largest independent video game companies, on next-generation game development pipelines. In 
July 2000, he founded BioGraphicTechnologies to create commercial "Al animation" middleware 
to transform the way digital entertainment is created and consumed Tutorial: (350) The Art of 
Modeling and Animating Triple A Titles in Maya See pags 34; Sponsored Session: Automatic 
Animation with Al. implant for Maya See pags m 

Mike Kulas 

Mike Kulas has been working in the game industry since 1981. Throughout the '80s he worked for 
Sublogic and BAOon numerous versions of Flight Simulator and related products. He worked 
briefly for Lookmgglass Technologies before cofounding Parallax Software with MattToschlog in 
1993. In 1996 Mike founded Volition as a spinoff of Parallax Software. He is married with three 
children. About a year ago he awoke to the realization he was no longer a programmer. He hopes 
to pick up programming after his retirement in about thirty years Panel: Starting a New Studio 
See page 56 

Joey Kuras 

Joey Kuras is an audio guy extraordinaire. Since 1994 he has been responsible for all sound 
design, dialog editing, field recording, mixing, character & creature voices, and implementation 
for Tommy Tallarico Studios. In that time he has worked on over 100 games including 
Earthworm Jim, MDK, Tony Hawk Pro Skater, Spider-Man, Maximo, Unreal II, and Unreal 
Tournament 2004. Being the only sound guy atTTS, he is kept quite busy. Originally starting at 
Virgin Games in 1992, he quickly learned his craft, finding he had a natural talent for sound 
design. His love of video games and sound design seemed to be the perfect match. He is current- 
ly on the advisory board for GANG, as a "Sound Expert" helping other aspiring sound designers 
with his years of knowledge creating sound effects Panel: Sound Design: Strategies for Success 
See page 46 

Julian Kwasneski 

Julian Kwasneski started his career in game audio at LucasArts Entertainment Company, and is 
credited with sound design on several leading LucasArts titles. After leaving the company in 
2000, he co-founded The Bay Area Sound Department with Clint Bajakian. Julian has worked on 
many award-winning game titles, including Starcraft: Ghost, James Bond: Everything or 
Nothing, Star Trek: Bridge Commander, Star Wars: Jedi Outcast, Star Wars: Knights of the 
Old Republic, and SOCOM: Navy Seals. His consistent sound design has been critically acclaimed 
by ign.com, epigamer.com, gamezone.com, Computer Gaming World, gamepro.com. and others 
He also has many independent film credits, including sound design for Big Love (Sundance 
2000), The Upgrade (Mill Valley Film Festival 2000), and The Last Birthday Card. He has worked 
extensively with wireless and Internet audio technologies Panel: Audio Asset Management for 
Large Projects See page 42. Panel: Sound Design: Strategies for Success See page 46 

Michael Land 

Michael Land is a composer and designer of interactive music systems in the computer games 
industry. He served as head of music and sound at LucasArts Entertainment Company from 1990 
to 2000, where he built and managed one of the industry's most respected audio departments 
and composed music for a number of award-winning LucasArts titles including: Monkey Island 
1-3, The Dig, Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis, Pit Droids and TIE Fighter. He also co- 
designed and developed LucasArts patented iMUSE System for interactive music. Prior to 
LucasArts, he developed award-winning MIDI software for Lexicon Inc., a leading audio technolo- 
gy manufacturer. His speaking engagements include E3 Expo, Game Developers Conference and 
Audio Engineering Society, and he has served on the Audio Advisory Boards for Microsoft and 
Apple. He is currently an independent composer Panel: The State of Non-Linear Audio for 
Interactive Media See page 46 






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SPEAKER BIOS 



Jeff Lander 

Jeff Lander is founder of Darwin 3D, a company geared toward 
a higher adaptation of real-time 3D graphics. Jeff has worked 
as a programmer for more than 10 years in the videogame, 
television, and film arenas where he has developed many real- 
time graphic applications. Darwin 3D's many game and enter- 
tainment clients include Luxoflux, Exakt Entertainment, MCM 
Animation, Quantumworks Corporation, and Rhythm and 
Hues Studios. He has also written extensively for Came 
Developer magazine and spoken at many industry trade 
shows and conferences. Lecture: True Crime: Streets of L.A. - 
Bringing Crime to the City of Angels See page 107 

Stephen Lang-mead 

Sponsored Session: Government Simulation in jds Max See 

page 113 

Frank Lantz 

Tutorial: (353) Came Tuning Workshop See page 31 

Francois Dominic Laramee 

Francosi Dominic Laramee, an 11-year veteran of the industry 
and a freelancer since 1998, has designed, produced, pro- 
grammed, and/or written more than 20 games on half a 
dozen platforms. He has edited and co-written two books, 
Came Design Perspectives and Secrets of the Game Business. He 
has also published over 40 articles for and about game devel- 
opers in a variety of online and print markets, and he moon- 
lights as a comedy writer Panel: ICDA Quality of Life White 
Paper Unveiling See page 76. Roundtable: Quality of Life: The 
Next Step See page 79, Lecture: The Weil-Fed Freelancer: A 
Survival Guide in 24 Easy Lessons See page 57 

Tim Larkin 

Tim Larkin is currently the audio director for Cyan Worlds, the 
makers of Myst, Riven and now Uru: Aces Beyond Myst Tim 
has over ten years experience in the game audio industry hav- 
ing created music and sound design for titles such as Middle 
Earth, Lord Of The Rings, Robota by Doug Chiang (Art 
Director of Star Wars Episode /and //), Prince Of Persia III, and 
many more as well as winning an Academy Award for his part 
as sound designer for the "Best Animated Short Film" in 2002. 
His experience in the music industry dates back to live per- 
formances as a trumpet player with artists such as Ella 
Fitzgerald, James Brown, Mel Torme, Sheila E and Huey Lewis 
to name a few. He has recorded on albums for various artists 
including Ice-T and also as a solo artist for Avenue Jazz. 
Various films, TV series and documentaries have featured 
Tim's work as well. Films such as HBO's The Rat Pack, White 
Mile and Floundering and documentaries such as National 
Geographies Lost Fleet Of Guadalcanal, Pearl Harbor and The 
White House, and American Experience documentaries on 
Galileo and the Wright Brothers are only a few of the many 
projects to which he has lent his talent. Most recently, Tim has 
created sound design and completed composing the sound- 
track for Uru. Almost three years in the works, the score repre- 
sents an eclectic palette of styles and instruments. Panel: 
Sound Design: Strategies for Success See page 46 

Josh Larson 

Josh Larson, as director, manages GameSpot Trax and related 
products serving the game industry. Prior to joining 
GameSpot in 2002, Josh worked with CNET Networks, consult- 
ing to leading consumer technology companies like Dell and 
Gateway on their online marketing strategy. Josh has also 
advised consumer retail companies on equity offerings and 
mergers & acquisitions as part of the investment banking 
group at Robert W. Baird & Co. Josh holds an MBA from the 
Darden Business School at the University of Virginia and a BS 
in Economics from Dartmouth College Sponsored Session: 
GameSpot Trax: Get the Buzz on Your Game (Before Your 
Competitors Do) See page 51 

Lutz Latta 

Lutz Latta currently works as a software developer for Massive 
Development, an engine and game developer located in 
Mannheim, Germany. He was lead programmer for the recent- 
ly released DirectX9 benchmark Aquamark3, previously 
worked on the PC version of the action game Aouanox2: 
Revelation, and is now involved in the PS2 development of 
that title. At only 25 years of age Lutz Latta is one of the 
youngest speakers at this year's GDC. In 2001 he finished his 
studies at the University of Applied Sciences Wedel, Germany, 
and at the University of the West of England, Bristol. His dis- 
sertation about realistic real-time rendering was published in 
the papers program at Siggraph 2002 Lecture: Building a 
Million-Particle System See page 94 



Nicole Lazzaro 

Nicole Lazzaro, president and founder of XEODesign, Inc., pro- 
vides over 13 years of extensive expertise in designing Player 
Experiences for mass market entertainment and has consult- 
ed on games and consumer creativity products for Sony, Leap 
Frog, Mattel, The Learning Company, Mindscape, Broderbund, 
Roxio, and Maxis. She has enhanced the player experience of 
Sony Online's multiplayer game shows such as Jeopardy as 
well as pumped up the fun for more casual entertainment 
experiences such as Cosmopolitan Virtual Makeover 2, Mad 
Magazine Archive, Mavis BeaconTeaches Typing, Easy CD 
Creator, and Toast. Nicole contributed to the birth of the Bay 
Area Multimedia Industry by co-founding the Multimedia 
Studies Program at San Francisco State University. With more 
than 150 classes it has trained more than 9,000 students over 
the past 10 years. As part of this faculty she taught several 
classes including Interface Design and Rapid Prototyping as 
well as wrote the program's instructor's guide on Interface 
Design Lecture: Why We Play Games: The Four Keys to Player 
Experience See page 71 

An Le 

An Le is a senior software engineer with eight years experi- 
ence working on software development and software opti- 
mization for the latest Intel® Processors. Sponsored Session: 
Enhancing Software Performance with Intel® Compiler See 
page 98 

Marc LeBlanc 

Marc LeBlanc, a ten-year veteran of the game industry, spent 
the bulk of his career at Lookingglass Studios. There, he was a 
core contributor to several award-winning game titles, includ- 
ing the Thief and System Shock series. His roles included pro- 
grammer, game designer, and project leader. Later he joined 
Visual Concepts, where he contributed technology to the Sega 
Sports titles, and also helped develop original game concepts. 
At present, he works as a game designer and programmer at 
Mind Control. He lives in his charming bungalow in Berkeley, 
CA, where he can frequently be found getting trounced by his 
peers at German board games. Marc attended MIT, where he 
was awarded a Master's degree in Computer Science, and the 
rank of Master Assassin. He has lectured on game design at 
conferences and universities. This is his sixth year on the GDC 
faculty Tutorial: (353) Game Tuning Workshop See page 31 

Andrew Leker 

Andrew Leker has been in the game industry since 1983, when 
he created and wrote the SkyRealms of Jorune role-playing 
game and series of books. Since then, he's developed his com- 
pany, Mind Control Software into a shop that specializes in 
innovative design. His entry into the first Independent Games 
Festival, Resurrection, was awarded Best Game Design and 
has received accolades for its originality and ease of play. 
Andrew continued Resurrection's design at Visual Concepts 
as a Dreamcast title called Ooga Booga. He is a previous GDC 
speaker on the topic of game design, and has been a faculty 
member for the Game Tuning Workshop. Tutorial: (353) Game 
Tuning Workshop See page 37 

Jessica Lewis 

Jessica Lewis is an associate producer for The Sims Online. 
Jessica has been with Maxis and Electronic Arts for two years, 
devoted solely to The Sims franchise. Prior to this she worked 
for two and a half years with an online educational network 
as a producer. Jessica also volunteers with the Women in 
Game Development (WIGD) Committee of the IGDA Group 
Gathering: Women's Group Gathering See page 80 

Steve Librande 

Tutorial: (353) Game Tuning Workshop See page 37 

Bill Licea-Kane 

Bill Licea-Kane is at ATI Research in the Advanced Technology 
Group. Bill is chair of the GL2 workgroup of the OpenGL ARB, 
which is finishing the shading language and related exten- 
sion specifications. Previously. Bill worked at 3Dlabs, Compaq, 
and Digital, where he began working with computer graphics 
in the early 1980s. Bill recently taught at the OpenGL 2.0 
course at SIGGRAPH 2002 Tutorial: (340) Advanced OpenGL 
Tutorial See page 35 

Riccard Linde 

Riccard Linde started his life with computer graphics at the 
age of 12. Richard co-developed an unreleased game at the 
age of 16. While attending school for traditional art he was 
also working as a freelancer for a video effects company. 
Sweden's mandatory army service made him open his eyes to 



new possibilities, and led him to take some time off to travel. 
Richard finally decided to go back into computer games in 
2000 when he came into contact with Digital Illusions 
Sweden, where he started as a 3D artist for the game of the 
year, Battlefield 1942. At the end of the project he was pro- 
moted to lead artist, art director, and art technical director. He 
has also worked on Road to Rome and Secret Weapons, 
expansion packs to Battlefield 1942. He is now working as art 
director for Battlefield Vietnam at Digital Illusions Canada. 
Lecture: Outdoor Jungle Vegetation: Battlefield Vietnam See 
page 114 

Alastair Lindsay 

Alastair Lindsay of Sony Computer Entertainment Europe has 
been in the game industry since 1993, where he started out as 
a composer for Imagitec Design. Since then he has worked at 
Psygnosis London Studio as a sound designer/composer, and 
now is a senior sound designer at SCEE's London Development 
Studio. He has worked on a large number of titles, on various 
platforms, ranging from Tempest 2000 on the Atari Jaguar, to 
The Getaway, Eye Toy and Hardware: Online on the PS2. 
Tutorial: (347) Audio Boot Camp See page 36 

Noel Llopis 

Noel Llopis is the author of the book C++ for Game 
Programmers. Noel has also contributed several articles to the 
Game Programming Gems series. He currently works for Day 1 
Studios as a software engineer, where he worked on the tech- 
nology behind the Xbox game Mechassault. He is now busy 
researching and implementing the technology for Dayi's next 
game. He focuses on anything and everything related to the 
game engine, from the overall architecture, to the nitty-gritty 
details of graphics, collision detection, or resource manage- 
ment. He obtained his undergraduate degree in Computer 
Engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 
and his Master's degree in Computer Science from the 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Roundtable: By the 
Books: Solid Software Engineering for Games Sony Computer 
Entertainment Europe See page 95 

Starr Long- 
Starr Long has been in the business of making PC games for 
more than ten years. Alongside Richard Garriott, he was the 
original producer for the commercially successful Ultima 
Online. To date Ultima Online is the most successful Ultima 
title ever and one of the top revenue earners of all time for 
Electronic Arts. Starr was also the producer for Ultima Online 
2. Starr's success is defined by his firsthand experiences in the 
trenches of game development. Starr worked his way up 
through the ranks of Origin Systems, Inc. starting as a temp 
employee in Quality Assurance, moving into lead positions for 
Bioforge, Ultima VIM, and many other titles. During his years 
at Origin, Starr received awards like Most Valuable Player, 
Manager of the Year, and Firefighter of the Year. Starr is cur- 
rently working with Richard Garriott on an online game code 
named Tabula Rasa for the Korean online game giant NCsoft, 
creators of the world's largest online game: Lineage. Lecture: 
Accurate Prediction and Other Organizational Myths See page 
82 

Jeremy Long-ley 

Jeremy Longley graduated from Cambridge University in 1996, 
then he worked as a lead programmer at Bullfrog Productions 
before setting up and running the independent development 
company Lost Toys in 1999. Lost Toys produced six skus of two 
critically acclaimed games, M0H0 and Battle Engine Aouila, 
but closed down in 2003. Jeremy is now an executive producer 
at Kuju Entertainment, overseeing development of a key prod- 
uct in its London Studio Roundtable: Being Competitive 
Without an Unlimited Budget See page 83 

Greg LoPiccolo 

Greg LoPiccolo is vice president of product development at 
Harmonix Music, a developer of console music games like 
Frequency, Amplitude, and Karaoke Revolution. Before join- 
ing Harmonix Music in 1998, he spent several years at Looking 
Glass Studios, eventually ending up as project leader on Thief. 
Before drifting into the game industry, he played bass in a 
Boston-area alternative rock band. Panel: IGDA Quality of Life 
White Paper Unveiling See page 76 

Tom Lorusso 

Tom"T-Lo"Lorusso is a member of the User-testing Group at 
Microsoft Game Studios, as well as usability trainer for new- 
hires. In addition, Tom manages other processes and employ- 
ees involved in user-based data collection Tom has personally 
contributed to several titles including Flight Simulator 2004 



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■130- 



www.gdconf.com 



SPEAKER BIOS 



and Impossible Creatures. Tom is currently finishing is Masters' degree in Human Factors and 
Ergonomics from Cornell University, specializing in office ergonomics and usability. The User- 
testing Croup uses psychological research methods to collect feedback that improves the fun 
and ease of use of games published by Microsoft. Since 1998, the group has tested 30,000+ 
gamers, playing more than 175 different games (from Microsoft and competitors), on PC and all 
major console platforms (Xbox, PSi & PS2, Gamecube & N64, and Dreamcast) Tutorial: (359) Do- 
it-Yourself Usability: A Crash Course on User-Testing See page 34 

Seth Luisi 

Lecture: SOCOM II: Creating a Compelling Online Console Came See page 87 

Rob Mace 

Tutorial: (340) Advanced OpenCL Tutorial See page 35 

Jennifer MacLean 

Jennifer McLean's responsibilities as director of Subscriber Applications at Comcast Online 
Communications include business development for the country's largest high-speed Internet 
provider, focusing on customer value and services such as interactive entertainment. Jennifer has 
had a long and varied career in game development, with extensive online content development 
experience. After beginning her career at Microprose Software, she joined AOL in 1996 as a 
Product Manager in the Games Channel. During her tenure at AOL, she held numerous positions 
in the AOL brand programming division, specializing in interactive entertainment. Jennifer is a 
frequent speaker at interactive entertainment industry events, and has earned a B.A. in 
International Relations from the Johns Hopkins University and an M.B.A. with a concentration in 
International Business from the Columbia Business School. Jennifer resides in Valley Forge, 
Pennsylvania, with her husband Roundtable: Online Games Business: Best Practices, or Learning 
from the Smart (and Not So Smart) Things Other People Do See page 55, Tutorial (334) Casual 
Games Summit See page 34 

Dean Maori 

Dean Macri is a Staff Technical Marketing Engineer within Intel's Software Solutions Group. Dean 
has a Master's degree in engineering from the University of Pennsylvania where he concentrated 
on 3D graphics. He spent over five years working for a small company creating multimedia kiosk 
pieces Dean has worked for Intel for the past six years and he currently does research, software 
optimization and evangelism to developers working on high-performance games Sponsored 
Session: Simulating Cloth and Clothing See page 106 

Dev Madan 

Dev Madan started in the games industry in 1990, working at Taito Software developing for the 
8-bit Nintendo system. From there, Dev worked as a freelance illustrator for such clients as 
Squaresoft, the Seattle Supersonics and Warner Brothers. In 1992, he returned to games and 
helped launch Humongous Entertainment, where his duties included character design and set- 
ting visual styles for the titles. In 1994 Dev broke into the comic book industry working for a vari- 
ety of publishers including Dark Horse Entertainment, Marvel and Image comics, but mostly at 
DC Comics working on such titles and Batman Adventures. Judge Dredd, Plastic Man, and a cre- 
ator-owned series Young Heroes in Love- He joined Sucker Punch in 1998 as Art Director, shipping 
the company's first title Rocket: Robot on Wheels, and recently Sly Cooper and the Thievius 
Raccoonus Lecture: Visualizing Sly Cooper See page n6 

Markus Maki 

Markus Maki is one of the founders of Remedy Entertainment and has worked in varied produc- 
tion roles in all of Remedy's titles since 1995. For The Fall of Max Payne, he worked as develop- 
ment director in the project. Additionally he's worked as the CTO at Futuremark and 
Madonion.com on multiple commercial 3D graphics projects, including the Final Reality bench- 
mark, 3DMark benchmarks plus custom demos for ATI, Nvidia, and Intel Lecture: Seven Years of 
Max Payne See page 87 

John Malenic 

John Malenic , in his first year at Nvidia, restructured and managed staffing and began the build- 
ing of an HR generalist organization. Subsequent to that effort, he's been focused on growing 
that generalist organization and function. As of this writing, he is continuing that effort as well 
as working on international projects. Prior to Nvidia, he consulted for about a year or so, primari- 
ly for dotcoms. John has over 20 years of HR experience, mostly in high tech companies, having 
worked for Games.com (part of Hasbro at the time), IPAC (semiconductor packaging company), 
Cisco, Apple (and Claris/FileMaker), Mervyn's and Macys. John holds a BA in Psychology. Tutorial: 
(346) Human Resources Forum: Trends and Directions See page 33 

Yannis Mallat 

Lecture: Re-awakening a Classic: Prince of Persia: A Case Study See page 86 

Dominic Mallinson 

Dominic Mallinson, after graduating in Computer Science from the University of Durham, 
England, spent time at Microsoft working on compilers before returning to the UK to work for 
Pilkington Glass on CAD and factory automation. Dominic joined Psygnosis and remained there 
for seven years during which time Sony acquired the company. He worked on various game titles 
including the PlayStation launch title WipeOut Since 1998, he has managed the PlayStation 
Research & Development group in North America Sponsored Session: PS9 See page 68 

Richard Marks 

Richard Marks was an Avionics major at MIT before getting his PhD at Stanford in the area of 
visual sensing for underwater robots. Richard then joined Teleos Research, a computer vision 
start-up that was later acquired by Autodesk. He joined PlayStation R&D four years ago to focus 
on real-time video input to PS2, and he is credited as the inventor of the EyeToy technology. He 
now manages R&D the Special Projects group, which includes man-machine interfaces and 
physical simulation research Sponsored Session: PS9 See page 68 



Steve Martin 

Steve Martin. for almost two decades, has been successfully managing business finances and 
operations for a variety of companies. He joined the rapidly growing computer games industry in 
1994, as Controller for Microprose Software, Inc., a $60 million developer and publisher of com 
puter games. He then went on to found Absolute Quality, Inc. (AQI), an international software 
testing and technical support center specializing in game platforms. In his six years as Chief 
Financial and Administrative Officer, Steve grew AQI's employee base from 16 to over 200, 
expanded operations internationally, and increased the company's business to $10 million, aver- 
aging greater than 100% growth each year. In 2002, Firaxis Games, a world renowned developer 
of top-selling computer games, appointed Steve Chief Operating Officer, in charge of the overall 
operations of the company. With his phenomenal management skills and keen financial sense, 
Steve has built upon Firaxis's solid foundation and elevated the company to new fiscal heights in 
just two short years. He secured a multi-year, multi-product development deal with Atari, Inc. 
(one of the largest interactive entertainment publishers in the world), increased the number of 
product development teams in the studio, managed the facility's expansion from 13,000 sq. ft. to 
28,000 sq.ft., and successfully released both Civilization III: Play the World and Civilization III: 
Conquests within 24 months of development. In 2003, Steve Martin was honored by the 
Baltimore Business Journal in their prestigious "40 Under 40" selection, recognizing him as one of 
Maryland's most prominent young business leaders Tutorial: (346) Human Resources Forum: 
Trends and Directions See page 33 

Michael Mateas 

Michael Mateas' work explores the intersection between art and artificial intelligence, forging a 
new art practice and research discipline called Expressive Al. He is currently a faculty member at 
the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he holds a joint appointment in the College of 
Computing and the school of Literature, Communication, and Culture. At Georgia Tech, Michael is 
the founder of a game lab, whose mission is to push the technological and cultural frontiers of 
computer-based games Michael is currently collaborating with Andrew Stern in the develop- 
ment of Facade, an attempt to move beyond traditional branching or hyper-linked narrative to 
create a fully-realized, one-act interactive drama. Michael's previous Al-based artwork includes 
Terminal Time, a mass audience, interactive, story generation machine that constructs ideologi- 
cally biased documentary histories in response to audience feedback, and Office Plant #1, a desk- 
top sculpture that responds to the social and emotional tone of email received by its owner. 
Lecture: Beyond Finite State Machines: Managing Complex, Intermixing Behavior Hierarchies See 
page 94 

Christopher Maughan 

Christopher Maughan has worked in the graphics hardware industry for ten years. He began his 
career working on a video digitizer product for a startup company, soon followed by a move to 
3Dlabs where he wrote the first OpenGL device driver for Windows 95 in collaboration with 
Microsoft. Chris then developed the company's DirectX driver, staying for 5 years before leaving 
to join Nvidia. At Nvidia he works in the Developer Tools group, focusing on providing tools and 
sample software for game developers. Chris works from home in York, in the North of England, 
where he lives with his wife Stacey. He's still trying to figure out what he did right to get the girl, 
the job, and the location Sponsored Session: Tools to Squeeze Maximum Performance from Your 
GPU See page 107 

Chuck McFadden 

Chuck McFadden is one of two senior QA Leads at LucasArts Entertainment. Chuck has worked in 
the QA department for nearly four years and has an intimate understanding of the QA process. 
Chuck has worked on more LucasArts games than he can count, including most recently Rogue 
Leader, Jedi Outcast, and Gladius; and each game has presented unique challenges to the QA 
process Roundtable: Managing the QA Process See page 85 

Mitzi MeGilvray 

Mitzi MeGilvray has been active in the game industry for eighteen years. She is a board member 
for the International Game Developer's Association (IGDA). Her career started at the once well- 
known game company, Epyx. There, she spent two years on the phone listening to customers. 
Since then, she has held production roles at Activision, Maxis.Tengen, Electronic Arts, Slam Dunk 
Productions and is currently the Executive Producer at Tapwave, the company with the hottest 
new mobile entertainment gear. Sponsored Session: Tapwave: A New Mobile Entertainment 
Platform to Showcase Your Talents See page 69 

John McLean-Foreman 

John McLean-Foreman of Lionhead Studios has been writing professionally for the videogame 
and entertainment industries since 1996. After beginning as a reporter and editor for Vancouver 
Style, he also wrote for such prestigious properties as Entertainment Tomorrow, Electric 
Playground, Computer and Videogames dot Com, and Gamasutra. Over the years, John created 
and produced projects such as Vancouver Style (city guide and daily entertainment magazine), 
The Aerospace Project (weekly online radio new program discussing the aerospace industry), and 
Xenomoprh (online radio comedy). Other projects John has been involved with include a co-pro- 
duced charity production of The Vagina Monologues in London, U.K., TV segment production of 
Entertainment Tomorrow, and script doctoring for the British screenplay Missing You. John has 
spent the past three years dedicating his life to the creation of compelling stories. John is cur- 
rently the story writer for the videogame Black & White 2 for Lionhead Studios. Tutorial: (358) 
How to Write an Unforgettable Story See page 32 

Rob McNair 

Robert McNair is an 18 year Intel Veteran with experience in chip design, manufacturing, mother- 
board design, graphic chips, chipsets & CPUs for handhelds, mobile, desktops and servers. He is 
currently Marketing Director for Handheld Graphics Operations. His previous positions include 
director of application engineering for Desktop Products Group and Intel Architecture Marketing 
Group where Robert managed Application Engineering for Intel chipset and CPUs for mobile, 
desktop, and servers. Rob is a graduate of University California Davis with B.S. in Electrical 
Engineering and Computer Engineering with emphasis on digital signal processing. Sponsored 
Session: The Future of Handheld Gaming See page 98 




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SPEAKER BIOS 



Mike McShaffry 

Mike McShaffry began his game programming career at 
Origin Systems in October of 1990. Mike contributed variously 
as a programmer, lead programmer, technology director, and 
producer to titles like Martian Dreams, Ultima VII, Ultima 
VIII, Ultima IX, and Ultima Online. In 1997 Mike founded 
Tornado Alley, a garage start-up whose goal was to create No 
Grownups Allowed, a massively multiplayer world for chil- 
dren. During that time, Mike worked on a number of online 
and CD-ROM software projects, one of which was 
Magnadoodle by Mattel. Mike co-founded Compulsive 
Development in 2000, serving as head of studio, which 
employed 20 developers and completed four casual games for 
Microsoft. In August, 2002 Compulsive was acquired by Glass 
Eye Entertainment and Mike became the director of software 
development. Mike's duties at Glass Eye include software pro- 
duction management, technology research, and business 
development. Mike is the author of Came Coding Complete, 
published by Paraglyph Press in the spring of 2003. Lecture: 
Spare No Expense: Starbucks and Aeron Chairs for Everyone 
See page 36 

Gary MeTaggart 

Gary McTaggart of Valve Software has been programming 
since age 12. His professional career began in 1995 when he 
became jDfx's employee number 11, in charge of creating 
demos such as Valley of Ra and Wizard's Tower for Voodoo 
Graphics products. Gary joined Valve's engineering staff in 
March 1999, leveraging his graphics programming experience 
to extend the rendering capabilities of Valve's Source engine, 
the technology used to power Half-Life 2 and Valve's next 
generation of games Tutorial: (337) Advanced Visual Effects 
with Direct3D See page 33 

Larry Mellon 

Larry Mellon is a senior engineer for Electronic Arts (Maxis 
Studio), where he led an automated testing and tools team 
for The Sims Online. A former University bum, Larry funded 
his school habit as an itinerant programmer across a wide set 
of research groups. Larry has worked in the field of large-scale 
distributed systems for over fifteen years, spanning commer- 
cial software development and applied research into synchro- 
nization and scaling techniques for massively multi-player 
military training simulations. As a lead architect in DARPA's 
Advanced Distributed Simulation, Synthetic Theatre of War, 
and Advanced Simulation Technology Thrust programs, Larry 
was a key contributor to the DoD's High Level 
Architecture/Run-Time Infrastructure 2.0 (now IEEE 1516). Larry 
has been in the gaming industry for more than three years. 
Lecture: The Collection and Applications of Metrics in an MMP 
Game: Lessons Learned from: The Sims Online See page 93 

Marc Mencher 

Marc Mencher, of Gamerecruiter.com, is a specialist in game 
industry careers and author of the widely acclaimed Get in the 
Came: Careen in the Came Industry, has helped thousands of 
job seekers land jobs with the hottest gaming companies. 
Before joining Gamerecruiter.com he worked for game com- 
panies such as Spectrum Holobyte, Microprose. and 3DO. Marc 
served as President of the International Game Developers 
Network, then as an advising board member for the following 
year. He has spoken and held roundtables at several Game 
Developers Conferences, is a regular speaker at International 
Game Developers Association (IGDA) events around the coun- 
try, and was a featured panelist at E3 2002. In addition to rep- 
resenting the game industry's hottest talent, Marc also volun- 
teers his time as a career coach for graduates from Full Sail 
Real World Education, helping them land their first game 
industry jobs. Group Gathering: Newbie Artists' Group 
Gathering See page 78-, Group Gathering: Newbie Designers' 
Group Gathering See page 78: Group Gathering: Newbie 
Programmers' Group Gathering See page 78 

Julien Merceron 

See page 17 for bio. Lecture: The Impact of Middleware 
Technologies on Your Game Development See page 84 

Steve Meretzky 

Steve Meretzky 0fW0rldwinner.com has been designing 
games in a variety of genres since 1982 for Infocom, Activision, 
Legend Entertainment, and his own development company 
Boffo Games. He is currently Creative Content Director at 
Worldwinner.com, where players can play games of skill in 
cash tournaments Tutorial: (334) Casual Games Summit See 
page 34 



Clarinda Merripen 

Clarinda Merripen coordinates finance, IT needs, human 
resources, and facilities at Cyberlore Studios by bringing its 
guiding principals into play. Her specialty is incorporating 
strategic influences into everyday activities paying particular 
attention to things that keep the employees healthy, wealthy, 
and wise. In her six years at Cyberlore, she has been actively 
involved in the growth of the management group, the cre- 
ation of a solid fiscal infrastructure, and shepherding the 
company into a dynamic and constructive human resource 
policy. In 1983 she graduated from Phillips Academy in 
Andover, then matriculated from University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst with a major in Women's Studies and a minor in 
Computer Science. In her youth she published books of poetry 
and photography, held dozens of three-day long live role-play- 
ing events for 150 people, and worked with emotionally dis- 
turbed teens. She then became the Membership Coordinator 
for the National Association for Mediation in Education 
(NAME) Tutorial: (346) Human Resources Forum: Trends and 
Directions See page 33 

Syrus Mesdag-hi 

Syrus Mesdaghi has been developing in Java since 1998 and 
has put forth many efforts in improving, demonstrating, and 
promoting the Java technology. He received his B.S. in 
Computer Science from the University of Central Florida His 
research interests include artificial intelligence and physics for 
games. He currently teaches the artificial intelligence course 
at Full Sail, which is part of the Game Design & Development 
curriculum. Syrus has developed innovative game technology 
demos for Full Sail and Sun Microsystems displayed at various 
conferences such as GDC (2001-2002), SIGGRAPH (2000-2001), 
and Quakecon. At SIGGRAPH 2000, he demonstrated Java3D in 
a full virtual reality set-up (HMD, trackers, controller) running 
on a laptop. Other game projects included genres such as 
Jamid, Balance of Power, and Java3D Grand Prix Tutorial: 
(343) Professional Java Game Development Techniques See 
page 35 

Greg- Mills 

Greg Mills has over ten years of marketing and business expe- 
rience in the gaming industry. As Business Development 
Manager of America Online's casual online gaming business, 
Greg is responsible for overall strategy including content 
acquisition, premium game services, market research and 
analysis. Prior to his seven years at America Online, Greg 
worked at WorldPlay Entertainment and at 3DO Company in a 
variety of marketing and business development positions. 
Mills earned his Bachelor's degree from Pomona College and 
an MBA from Santa Clara University. Panel: The State of the 
Web and Downloadable Games Industry: A 2004 IGDA Online 
Games White Paper See page 57 

Art Min 

Tutorial: (353) Game Tuning Workshop See page 31 

Joe Minton 

Joe Minton is responsible for overseeing the day-to-day opera- 
tions of Cyberlore Studios, Inc. Cyberlore is an independent 
developer that has bootstrapped itself into creating multi-mil- 
lion dollar projects. Joe has been central to growing the com- 
pany and keeping it stable through the often turbulent times 
in the industry. In its eleven year history (at least three life- 
times in this business), Cyberlore has become known as a reli- 
able developer that is easy to work with, that consistently 
delivers highly regarded projects, and has never had layoffs. 
This is due in part to Joe's fiscal discipline and his focus on 
fostering an employee-friendly workplace. Cyberlore empow- 
ers people to do their best work while giving them the struc- 
ture to do it in an efficient and effective way His mantra that 
great teams make great games instead of fostering one per- 
son as a rock star has been another key component to creat- 
ing a studio that just keeps getting better. Joe was featured in 
the Wall Street Journal as the U.S. representative for their 
International Young Entrepreneurs story and he serves on the 
board of the region's Technology Enterprise Council Lecture: A 
Road Map for Peace: Redefining the Publisher-Developer 
Relationship See page 36 

Jason Mitchell 

Jason Mitchell is the team lead of the 3D Application Research 
Group at ATI Research. Working on the Microsoft campus in 
Redmond, Jason has worked with Microsoft for several years 
to define key new Direct3D features. In addition to this, Jason 
and his team develop and publish novel rendering techniques 
as well as all of ATI's technical demo content. Jason regularly 
speaks about real-time 3D graphics techniques at game devel- 



oper conferences worldwide. Jason's publications and past 
talks can be found at www.pixelmaven.com/jason Tutorial: 
(337) Advanced Visual Effects with Direct3D See page 33 

Tetsuya Mizuguchi 

Lecture: Wants and Instincts See page 70 

Don Moar 

Don Moar began working for BioWare in 1999 as the lead of 
its tools programming team. This team is responsible for the 
content creation, asset management, and localization tools 
used by each project. Don has a B.Sc. in Computing Science 
from the University of Alberta Lecture: Growing a Dedicated 
Tools Programming Team: From Baldur's Gate to Star Wars 
Knights of the Republic See page 84 

Peter Molyneux 

Peter Molyneux of Lionhead Studios is one of the best-known 
names in the international world of computer games. He co- 
founded Bullfrog Productions in 1987 and created a new genre 
of computer games," the god game", with the release of 
Populous. Since then Peter has been responsible for a string 
of massive selling games including Powermoncer, Theme 
Park, Magic Carpet, and Dungeon Keeper. Cumulative sales 
of his games are now approaching the ten million mark 
worldwide. In 1997 Peter left Bullfrog Productions to form a 
new games development company Lionhead Studios. The 
company's first game Black & White was released to wide- 
spread critical acclaim in April 2001 and sales currently top 
the one and a half million mark. Peter is recognised as one of 
the industry's most articulate and eloquent speakers on the 
subject of the development of computer games. Lecture: 
Open Spaces and How to Find Them in New Game Ideas See 
page 67, Lecture: Ah Gameplay & Design: A Marriage of 
Heaven or Hell? See page 93 

John Morello 

John Morello. originally from Chesapeake, Virginia, came to 
Valve via the MOD community. As lead animator and designer 
on Day of Defeat, John has spent the majority of the past few 
years modeling and animating the objects and characters in 
the popular WWII themed online game Sponsored Session: 
Creating Characters, Models and Environments for Half-Life 2 
See page 61 

Brandon Moro 

Brandon Moro is a programmer at Nihilistic Software, where 
he works on various aspects of the game engine and tools. 
Brandon has worked on many commercial and open-source 
projects, and was a co-author of a published research paper 
regarding geometric constraint solving while attending the 
University of Florida Lecture: Integrating Physics into a 
Modern Game Engine See page 99 

Derrick Morton 

Derrick Morton has been creating and marketing entertain- 
ment software since 1994. He spent three years at Graphix 
Zone, publishers of the Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy! CD- 
ROM Games among many others, ultimately as vice president 
of development. In 1997 he joined Cimarron/Bacon/O'Brien, a 
top entertainment marketing design house in Los Angeles. At 
CBO he was the senior producer of a group which developed 
more than too interactive projects servicing all of the major 
motion picture studios. In January 2000 he joined a startup 
called iWin.com, a online game site which was eventually pur- 
chased by Vivendi Universal and renamed Flipside. Derrick 
served as the vice president, product for the company until 
February 2003 when he joined Gamehouse as vice president, 
marketing. At Gamehouse Derrick heads up game marketing, 
Gamehouse.com and Gamehouse's wireless and handheld 
businesses. Derrick holds a B.A, in Cinema-Television 
Production from the University of Southern California with 
Magna Cum Laude honors. Panel: The State of the Web and 
Downloadable Games Industry See page 37 

Andrew Mound 

Andy Mound, a designer for Pitboss.com since 1999, has pro- 
vided games, mathematical proofs, and consulting services for 
some of the largest gaming software companies in the indus- 
try. He also holds the world's only M.B.A. in Casino Gaming — 
granted through a designed program between Indiana 
University, Bloomington, and University of Nevada Reno's 
Institute for the Study of Gambling and Commercial Gaming. 
Before working for Pitboss.com, he was a game designer for 
Shuffle Master Gaming in Las Vegas, NV. Lecture: Designing 
Games for Coin-Op and Internet Gambling See page 62 



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SPEAKER BIOS 



Andy Murdock 

Andy Murdock graduated from the San Francisco Art Institute with a B.F.A. in painting and film. 
He then worked as a recording engineer/producer and sound designer for Hyde Street Studios 
and Earwax Productions doing albums, film soundtracks and commercials. Then he worked as a 
3d artist for Mondo Media. Xaos and PDI on films, television and videogames. Andy's first solo 
short film "Rocket Pants" was seen at the 2001 Sundance Film Festival, Santa Monica Film Festival 
a Moxie finalist, Santa Fe Film Festival and ResFest 2000. Andy also worked on "Gone Bad" which 
was accepted at the 2002 Sundance Film Festival. "LOR" has been accepted to the 2003 Sundance 
Film Festival Sponsored Session: Animations of Mass Desctruction See page ill 

Ray Muzyka 

Dr. Ray Muzyka is the Joint CEO and co-executive producer at BioWare Corp. He co-founded 
BioWare in 1995 with the other joint CEO at BioWare, Dr. Greg Zeschuk. Ray was the Co-Executive 
Producer on Baldur's Gate, Shattered Steel, MDK2, MDK2: Armageddon, Baldur's Gate: Tales 
of the Sword Coast, Baldur's Gate II: Shadows of Amn, Baldur's Gate II: Throne of Bhaal, and 
Neverwinter Nights. Ray is currently co-executive producer on BioWare 's upcoming project with 
LucasArts — Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic as well as several other, as-yet unan- 
nounced projects. In addition to his development role, Ray also co-manages the financial, human 
resources, operations, and legal business side of BioWare, and has recently finished his executive 
MBA. program at the Ivey School of Business, UWO Tutorial: (351) Developer Business Summit: 
An ICDA Think-Tank See page 37; Lecture: Managing the Hydra: Successfully Running Multiple 
Projects in a Videogame Studio See page 85 

Alexander Nareyek 

Dr. Alexander Nareyek is director of the Intelligent Agents Lab at theTU Munich, focusing on arti- 
ficial intelligence research in computer games. He received his diploma and Ph.D. from the TU 
Berlin. He won the GMD's Best Degree Thesis Award and was a winner of the BMWi's Founders 
Competition Multimedia. From 2002 to 2003, he has been a guest researcher at Carnegie Mellon 
University. He is author of dozens of Al-related papers, served as organizer for many Al events, 
gave invited talks at several conferences, and is chairperson of the IGDA's Artificial Intelligence 
Interface Standards Committee Roundtable: Al Interface Standards: Open Beta See page 73 

Paul Neale 

Paul Neale has been in the 3D animation business for eight years working on everything from TV 
commercials to feature films. Paul spent one and a half years working for Walt Disney animation 
on direct to video and a feature film called Return to Neverland. From Disney Paul moved to Red 
Rover Studios in Toronto as director and art director of the 3D animation department. Red Rover 
has created many award winning TV commercials for both the north and South American mar- 
kets. At the moment Paul is director of research and development at Elliott Animation creating 
TV series, feature film effects and game demos. At Elliott he is responsible for character rigging 
and modeling as well as technical direction, writing plug-ins and scripted tools for the systems, 
software and production needs. Paul is considered to be one of the top character rigger/techni- 
cal directors in the 3ds max community Sponsored Session: The Art and Science of Charracter 
Rigging See page m 

Tamra Nestler Fionda 

Tamra Nestler Fionda, founder and CEO of Tri Synergy, has created and established what is 
becoming one of the most highly regarded worldwide brands in the crowded, rapidly consolidat- 
ing computer game publishing industry. Tamra 's role encompasses managing both the compa- 
ny's overall direction and strategy. Drawing on more than 10 years of director-level retail buying 
experience at Compusa and Electronics Boutique has allowed Tamra to solidify her reputation as 
an innovator in marketing and distribution strategies. Tri Synergy, with Tamra 's direction, has 
orchestrated several successful title launches such as Anarchy Online: The Longest Journey. 
Runaway: A Road Adventure, Savage: The Battle for NEWERTH.and UFO: Aftermath. Tamra 's 
amazing ability to understand the big picture of the electronic game publishing industry, and 
her belief that the actual game developers deserve greater recognition, control, and profit for 
their role in the overall process, has allowed Tri Synergy to become one of the most successful 
independent game co-publishers in the Interactive Entertainment Industry. Tutorial: (351) 
Developer Business Summit: An IGDA Think-Tank See page 31 

Victor Ng-Thow-HLng 

Victor Ng-Thow-Hing is currently a member of the Digital Human Modeling group at the Honda 
Research Institute. Honda's goal is to build virtual, animatable recreations of individuals that can 
be used for human-dynamic simulation. His research interests include biomechanics and creat- 
ing realistic interactive models of humans for computer animation, including joints, and soft tis- 
sues like muscles. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Toronto in Computer Science, 
studying deformable muscle models for articulated characters Lecture: Revisiting the Standard 
Joint Hierarchy: Improving Realistic Modeling of Articulated Characters See page 106 

Robert Nideffer 

Panel: ArtModJam See pags 60 

Marcos Nunes-Ueno 

Marcos "YattaDog"Nunes-Ueno is a member of the user-testing group at Microsoft Game 
Studios. Marcos has worked in the usability field for seven years and has conducted user-testing 
research with more than 1200 gamers, summarizing close to 2000 hours gameplay. In addition, 
he is responsible for usability training for the user-testing group, teaching new members how to 
conduct usability testing on games. Prior to joining Microsoft, Marcos worked at Intel, where he 
conducted research for the Internet Business Solutions Group and the Center for Human Factors 
Engineering. He holds a degree in Psychology Research and has studied graduate-level Cognitive 
Psychology at the University of Washington. The user-testing group uses psychological research 
methods to collect feedback that improves the fun and ease of use of games published by 
Microsoft. Since 1998, the group has tested over 30,000 gamers, playing more than 175 different 
games (from Microsoft and competitors), on PC and all major console platforms (Xbox, PSi & PS2, 
Gamecube & N64, and Dreamcast) Tutorial: (359) Do-it-Yourself Usability: A Crash Course on 
User-Testing See page 34 



Christopher Oat 

Christopher Oat is a software engineer in the 3D Application Research Group at ATI, where he 
develops novel rendering techniques for real-time 3D graphics applications. His focus is on pixel- 
arid vertex-shader development for current and future graphics platforms. Christopher has con- 
tributed as an original member of the Rendermonkey development team, and more recently as a 
shader programmer for ATI's demos and screen savers. He regularly publishes articles on 
advanced rendering techniques in books such as Came Programming Gems 3, Game 
Programming Gems 4, ShaderX, and ShaderX2. Christopher is a graduate of Boston University 
Lecture: Adding Spherical Harmonic Lighting to the Sushi Engine See page 92 

James O'Brien 

James O'Brien is an assistant professor of Computer Science at the University of California, 
Berkeley. James primary area of interest is Computer Animation, with an emphasis on generating 
realistic motion using physically based simulation and motion capture techniques. He received 
his Ph.D. in Computer Science with an emphasis on Computer Graphics and Animation from the 
Georgia Institute of Technology. James has authored numerous papers, including several present- 
ed at the ACM SIGGRAPH conference, he has spoken at GDC, and his work has been featured 
multiple times in the SIGGRAPH Electronic Theater. He has been the recipient of several awards, 
most recently a research grant from the Okawa Foundation Lecture: Fast Yet Realistic 
Deformation and Fracture See page g8 

Dan O'Connell Offner 

Daniel O'Connell Offner is the founder of Offner & Anderson in Los Angeles, CA, and has partrici- 
pated as a panel member on the GDC software contracting tutorial for several years. Dan has an 
extensive law practice representing software developers, publishers, and creative talent. His 
clients include THO and UbiSoft Tutorial: (357) Leveraging Development Deals to Build Value in 
Your Studio See page 36 

Marty O'Donnell 

Marty O'Donnell of Microsoft has written and produced numerous original scores for TV, Radio, 
and Film. In 1997 his company Totalaudio, produced sound design, foley, and final mixes for 
Cyan's Riven, the Sequel to Myst, and all the original music, voices, and sound design for Bungie's 
award winning Myth: The Fallen Lords. TotalAudio went on to produce the audio for Valkyrie 
Studio's Septerra Core, Legacy of the Creator and Bungie's Myth II:Soulblighter In May of 
2000, ten days after Marty accepted a full time position with Bungie Software, focusing entirely 
on the audio production for ONI, Halo. Microsoft purchased Bungie and moved them to 
Redmond to develop games for the Xbox. The audio for Halo received numerous industry 
awards. Although still co-owner of Totalaudio with Mike Salvatori, who stayed in the Chicago 
studio, Marty is currently audio director for Bungie Studios at Microsoft Panel: The State of Non- 
Linear Audio for Interactive Media See page 46 

Doug- Og-lesby 

Doug Oglesby is a lead artist at Red Storm Entertainment, and has worked on nine game titles in 
some capacity, seven of them at Red Storm and four as lead artist (Politika, Ruthless.com, 
Shadow Watch, and Anne McCaffrey's Freedom: First Resistance). Doug received his degree in 
Communication Arts, with a focus in graphics and illustration, and worked for five years in televi- 
sion, during which he received an Emmy and five Emmy nominations, as well as three interna 
tional awards from the Broadcast Designers Association. Doug also had brief stints as a freelance 
illustrator, a potter, and a children's book illustrator Roundtable: Art Management for Artists See 
page 111 

Kevin O'Hara 

Kevin O'Hara of Sony Online Entertainment is the community relations manager for Starwars 
Galaxies since 2001 (in industry since 1995, starting with Meridian 59 at 3D0).The pre-launch 
SWG community had over 500,000 registrations to the fan club. Its beta community was over 
60,000 external testers. Kevin has worked five GDCs previously as a conference associate and 
look forward to now attending as a speaker Roundtable: MMO Communities: Fans and Flames 
See page 85 

Morris Olmsted 

Morris Olmsted recently joined the Rockstar San Diego family as a full-time Technical Artist to 
assist in tools and pipeline production. He graduated from East Tennessee State University with 
a Master's of Science in the Engineering Graphics Design Department (the Infamous A.V.L.) and a 
Minor in Computer Science. Previous to Rockstar, he worked for Idol Minds as a 3D & Technical 
Artist on such titles as Coolboarders 4, Coolboarders 2001 (PSXi), Coolboarders 2001 (PSX2) 
and My Street Tutorial: (350) The Art of Modeling and Animating Triple A Titles in Maya See 
page 34. Lecture: Maya for Games: Tools & Pipelines in Maya See page 174 

Matt Ontiveros 

Matt Ontiveros is currently a 3D artist at Amaze Entertainment in FX, modeling and animation- 
He is also an Instructor at Edmonds Community College teaching Maya and 3D animation. Matt 
has more than 7 years of experience working and teaching in 3D. Before his current position Matt 
worked for EA as an FX artist. He has also worked as an application engineer, as an instructor for 
Mesmer Animation Labs during its first four years, and various freelance gigs Tutorial: (350) The 
Art of Modeling and Animating Triple A Titles in Maya See page 34, Lecture: Hi Res Modeling for 
Consoles in Maya See page 113 




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SPEAKER BIOS 



Chinwe Onyekere 

ChinweOnyekere, M. PH., works on the Disparity Team and the 
Pioneer Portfolio at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation one 
of the nation's largest healthcare foundations. The Pioneer 
Portfolio at RWJF is charged with looking for emerging project 
opportunities that may provide unique breakthroughs in the 
provision of healthcare. Before joining RWJF, she was a 
researcher for a joint Harvard Medical School and Weill 
Medical College of Cornell University project, "Cultural 
Competence in Health Care ." Tutorial: Serious Games Summit 
See page 31 

Michael O'Shea 

Michael O'Shea is a program manager for the Technology 
Assistance Center at the National Institute for Justice (NIJ) 
The NIJ is the research, development, and evaluation agency 
of the U.S. Department of Justice and is dedicated to research- 
ing crime control and justice issues. Among NIJ's current proj- 
ects is the development of a game that will help municipal 
leaders develop response management strategies related to 
disaster and security events such as chemical spills, floods, or 
terrorist bombings. Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 
3> 

Trent Oster 

Trent Oster of Bio Ware Corp. is a nine year veteran of the com- 
puter game industry.Through that period he has worked as a 
development studio owner, an artist, a programmer, and final- 
ly a project director After working on the titles Shattered 
Steel and Baldur's Gate he led the development of 
Neverwinter Nights from concept to completion. Trent has 
recently completed the second expansion pack to 
Neverwinter Nights, The Hordes of the Underdark, and has 
just started a new unannounced project. Roundtable: User- 
Created Content: Is it Worth it? See page 88 

Jason Page 

Tutorial: (347) Audio Boot Camp See page 36 

Randy Pagulayan 

Randy Pagulayan is a user-testing Lead in the Microsoft Game 
Studios User-testing Group, a group which has been pioneer- 
ing the adaptation of usability and psychological testing to 
the entertainment software field. His most recent game cred- 
its include Brute Force (Xbox), Top Spin (Xbox), and Combat 
Flight Simulator 3 (PC). Randy's most recent publications 
include the following co-authored book chapters: Designing 
for Fun: User-testing Case Studies (2003) and User-Centered 
Design in Games (2003). Randy has also been an invited speak- 
er for the Nielsen Norman Group User Experience Event 2003 
where he taught user-testing methods in entertainment. 
Before joining Microsoft, Randy was an active researcher on 
international projects with laboratories in France and Japan, 
and also was part of the Human Factors & Ergonomics Group 
at Motorola Tutorial: (359) Do-it-Yourself Usability: A Crash 
Course on User-Testing See page 34 

Frank Pape 

Frank Pape has recently joined Microsoft as the lead product 
planner for Microsoft Games. Frank is in charge of all facets of 
product acquisition, including: industry research and acquisi- 
tion targeting, internal due diligence, deal term negotiation, 
legal document drafting oversight, and relationship manage- 
ment. Prior to joining Microsoft, Frank directed Electronic Arts' 
business development efforts for five years. Frank was respon- 
sible for the acquisition of and production oversight on 
dozens of titles that have shipped for EA, as well as, for several 
titles slated to ship in 2004. Frank received the EA Award of 
Excellence for his work. Prior to joining EA, Frank worked at 
Activision for two years, was an original member of their busi- 
ness development unit, and acquired a substantial number of 
products for their publication Frank received his B.A. from 
Stanford University, as well as, an M.A. and an M.B.A. from 
George Washington University Tutorial: (357) Leveraging 
Development Deals to Build Value in Your Studio See page 36 

Sam Park 

Sam Park has worked in the human resources field for high 
tech industries for the past six years. A UCLA grad, Sam owns 
a PHR certification, and before joining Atari, Sam handled HR 
for Electrolurgy. TriGem America Corp. and DCC Enterprises. 
Lecture: HR in the Studio See page 32 

Steve Pavlina 

Steve Pavlina is CEO and founder of Dexterity Software, an 
independent game developer and online publisher estab- 
lished in 1994. Steve has served as co-moderator of the 



International Game Developers Association's (IGDA) Indie 
Games SIG and served as both vice president and president of 
the Association of Shareware Professionals (ASP). He has sev- 
eral years of experience in taking original indie games to mar- 
ket and selling them direct to end users over the internet, 
games that would be nearly impossible to sell profitably 
through traditional retail channels. He speaks and writes reg- 
ularly to help small independent game developers tap into 
the wealth of opportunities available by selling their games 
direct over the internet Roundtable: Secrets of Successful 
Indie Developers See page 56 

Celia Pearce 

Celia Pearce is a game designer, artist, researcher, teacher, and 
author of The Interactive Book: A Cuide to the Interactive 
Revolution (Macmillan), as well as several others and articles 
on game design and culture. She is currently research and 
external relations manager, CAL (IT)2 arts layer and associate 
direct of Game Research at UC Irvine. While at University of 
Southern California, she produced "Entertainment in the 
Interactive Age," a highly acclaimed conference on game 
design, and helped to develop an M.F.A. Program in Interactive 
Entertainment. Ms. Pearce's 18-year career as interactive 
media designer includes: Iwerks and Evans &i Sutherland's 
award-winning Virtual Adventures; The Loch Ness Expedition, 
a 24-player virtual reality attraction; the lounge<s>siggraph and 
The VR Gallery; SIGGRAPH '95; and Purple Moon Friendship 
Adventure Cards for Girls. Other clients have included Walt 
Disney Imagineering, Universal Parks, LEGO Media, and 
Electronic Arts Panel: ArtModJam See page 60 

Maxim Perminov 

Maxim Perminov is a Software Application Engineer in Russia. 
He focuses on Consumer Applications, notably on games. Prior 
to Intel, he worked at DatacTechnlogies on enterprise SCADA 
software. His areas of expertise include software optimization 
and multi-threaded programming Lecture: Real World Multi- 
Threading in PC Games See page 104 

David Perry 

See page 81 for bio. Keynote: Production Through 
Collaboration: Escalating Demands on the Producer See page 



Michael Perry 

Michael Perry is a 10-year veteran of Maxis, during which time 
he has enjoyed working in a variety of roles on several games 
with some amazing people Michael produced and designed 
the award-winning title SimFarm with designer/programmer 
Eric Albers, and produced Yoot Saito's award-winning title 
Simtower. Michael also produced and programmed the 
Windows 95 version of Will Wright's Simcity Classic, and led 
the architecture design and development of the groundbreak- 
ing Sims Exchange on TheSims.com web site. Michael even 
scored the soundtrack for one game, for which he profusely 
apologizes and sincerely promises to never do again. Most 
recently, Michael was the design director of the Playstation 2 
version of The Sims Lecture: Port is a Four-Letter Word: The 
Challenges of Redesigning The Sims for the Console Market 
See page 6y 

Beau Persehall 

Turbo Squid is a fully-featured digital media marketplace for 
3ds max assets and the key partner behind the Discreet 
Certified 3ds max Plug-in Program. Whether you are in the 
market for 3ds max plug-ins or high quality digital assets, 
Turbo Squid provides a turnkey approach to bringing your dig- 
ital media to market and giving you control over your invento- 
ry, e-commerce, accounting, and receivables Sponsored 
Session: Discreet Certified 3DS Max Plug-ins: Plug-ins Within 
the Pipeline See page 113 

Johan Persson 

Johan Persson is a senior programmer at Digital Illusions. His 
work includes original concept, lead programmer and physics 
programmer on Battlefield 1942. He was also one of the co- 
founders of Refraction Games, the studio that developed 
Codename: Eagle; the little known prequel to Battlefield 
1942. Lecture: What Got Left out of Battlefield 1942 See page 
V 

Lewis Petersen 

Lewis Petersen, as President and CEO of 7 Studios, leads the 
company in day-to-day operations, overseeing the develop- 
ment of the studio as well as game production. Lewis brings 
twelve years of industry experience to the company, as well as 
a degree in Quantitative Economics from Stanford University 
(Phi Beta Kappa) and a J.D. from Yale Law School with a focus 



in business law. Prior to founding 7 Studios, Lewis worked at 
Westwood Studios in Las Vegas. His responsibilities included 
management of up to five teams, including at one point all of 
Westwood's external development, accounting for over 100 
people. Prior to Westwood, Lewis was a Producer/Director at 
Activision, working on a variety of titles as well as Activision's 
online strategy. Perhaps most important of all, Lewis was the 
Regional runner-up in the National Tron videogame competi- 
tion in 1983, narrowly missing a trip to Madison Square 
Garden for the finals by a few thousand points. Panel: 
Starting a New Studio See page 56 

Andrew Phelps 

Andrew Phelps of Rochester Institure of Technology is the 
founding faculty member of the Game Programming 
Concentration within the Department of Information 
Technology. His work in game programming education has 
been featured in 77ie New York Times, CNN.com, USA Today, 
National Public Radio, IEEE Computer, and several other peri- 
odicals. He regularly publishes work exploring web-based 
game engines at the Director Online User's Group and the 
Macromedia Devnet Center, and is currently at work on his 
first text with Prentice Hall. He maintains a web site at 
www.andysgi.rit.edu/ featuring his work as an educator, 
artist, programmer, and game addict, and currently teaches 
courses in multimedia programming, game engine develop- 
ment, 2D and 3D graphics, and information technology theory. 
Panel: The State of the Web and Downloadable Games 
Industry See page 57 

Jarrod Phillips 

Jarrod Phillips is senior vice president of Business 
Development as well as the executive producer at House of 
Moves motion capture studios in Los Angeles, CA. In his tenure 
at HOM, Jarrod has produced the motion capture work for 
more than 100 different projects including film work for 
Warner Bros, and Threshold Entertainment as well as com- 
mercials for Coca-Cola, Nike, and Simmons Mattress. He has 
also produced motion capture for many videogames for 
clients such as Microsoft. Electronic Arts, Namco, Sega, 
Accolade, Interplay.and many others. Previously, Jarrod served 
in a similar capacity at Biovision Motion Capture Studios in 
San Francisco, and was producer, Custom Modeling, at 
Viewpoint Datalabs, Orem, UT Lecture: Producing Motion 
Capture and Animation See page 86 

Adam Philp 

Adam Philp, a Cambridge graduate, took his first job at EMI's 
Central Research Laboratories, researching ways to replicate 
3d audio as perceived by the human ear. He went on to help 
design Sensaura's DSP-based 3D sound processing algorithms, 
as used by artists such as Frank Sinatra, which became the 
basis for Sensaura's PC-based driver technology This technolo- 
gy grew into what we now know as GameCODA with Adam 
being involved from the outset, working on API design, low- 
level code and the PS2 implementation. He now oversees 
GameCODA development as a whole. Sponsored Session: 
GameCODA: The Affordable Cross-Platform Game Audio 
Solution See page 44 

Mark Stephen Pierce 

Panel: Great Games in 50k: Three Addictive Mobile Phone 

Titles See page 65 

Patricia Pizer 

Patricia Pizer made her industry debut at Infocom in 1988, 
making games back when you didn't even need graphics. Over 
her career, she's worked at Boffo Games. CogniToy. 
THO/GameFx, and Harmonix Music. She served as creative 
director of Asheron's Call 2 at Turbine Entertainment and, 
most recently, Patricia worked with Ubi.com on Uru Live: Ages 
Beyond Myst and the upcoming release, The Matrix Online. 
Currently she does freelance consulting on the design of 
MMOs A founder of the Boston Area Game Developers' 
Network, she also serves on the board of directors of Zform. 
developers of game software for the visually impaired. Mostly 
though, she just likes to play games Tutorial: (334) Casual 
Games Summit See page 34 

Mike Pohl 

Mike Pohl. as the primary U.S. technical contact, works closely 
with Trymedia Systems' customers to answer technical ques- 
tions relating to Activemark and resolve any technical issues 
that arise. Mike also serves as a technical liaison between cus- 
tomers and Trymedia's development team in Europe. Mike has 
been involved with sales engineering for the past seven years, 
including stints with Siperian and Broadvision. Prior to that he 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



■134- 



www.gdconf.com 



SPEAKER BIOS 



held development positions at Oracle and Amdahl. He is a 1988 graduate of U.C. Santa Barbara. 
Sponsored Session: ActiveMARK Tutorial See page 92 

Darrell Porcher 

Darrell Porcher is director of network applications for Sony. E-Solutions division by day, chapter 
coordinator for the New Jersey Chapter of the IGDA, and garage game developer at all other 
times. Darrell has been developing games since the tender age of 10 on the Atari 400 computer 
(the one with the chiclet keyboard) and has recently been developing games for the latest in 
console platforms (big jump). He has taught courses on beginning game development to stu- 
dents aged 10 and above to a group within New York City, called the "Harlem Game Wizards "He 
also frequently holds seminars at local colleges promoting game development as a hobby and 
career path. He has been an active member in two of the Independent Came Festival's finalist 
teams and has always been a very vocal member of the IGDA, since he joined in 1995. 
Roundtable: Diversity in Game Development: Beyond Stereotypes See page 74 

Nick Porcino 

Nick Porcino has worked in games, graphics, robotics, and Al since 1980. Nick published papers 
focusing on the applications of neuroethology to robotic and agent control. Most recently, he has 
written on biologically inspired Al for Al Came Programming Wisdom 2. and physics simulation 
for Games Programming Cems 4. He worked in Japan on some of the earliest applications of Al to 
toys and robotic pets. Most of his career has focused on games, and he has shipped a great many 
on platforms as diverse as the Colecovision, Windows, and Playstation 2. Nick is the lead of the 
run time graphics group at the fucasArts Entertainment Company Roundtable: Al Interface 
Standards: Open Beta See page 73 

Arcot Preetham 

Arcot J. Preetham is a senior software engineer working on rendering techniques and architec- 
ture tools for next generation graphics hardware at ATI Research. Prior to this, he developed 3D 
modeling and reverse engineering software at Paraform Inc. and worked on rendering atmos- 
pheric effects for flight simulators at Evans & Sutherland. He received his M.S. in Computer 
Science from the University of Utah in 1999 and his B.Tech. in Computer Science from Indian 
Institute of Technology Madras, India, in 1996. He is actively involved in presenting at GDC and 
Siggraph Lecture: Procedural Shaders: A Feature Animation Perspective See page 104 

Marc Prensky 

Marc Prensky is a speaker, writer, consultant, and designer in the areas of education and learning 
He is the author of one of the first texts to cover the intersection of modern day games and 
learning issues, Digital Game-Based Learning (McGraw-Hill, 2001). Marc founded Games2train, 
whose clients include IBM, Nokia, Pfizer, and the US Department of Defense He also created the 
sites www.dodgamecommunity.com and www.socialimpactgames.com. Marc's writings can be 
found at www.marcprensky.com/writing/default.asp Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 
31 

Simon Pressey 

Simon Pressey has been an audio engineer/producer for more than 20 years. Born in the UK, he 
emigrated to Canada in 1986, where he spent 10 years as chief engineer at "Le Studio", Morin 
Heights located in the Laurentian mountains, working with a diverse variety of popular music 
artists- Rush. Shania Twain, London Symphony Orchestra , A-Ha, Celine Dion, to name a few. 
With credits on over 50 platinum selling albums, and a new millennium dawning he felt ready 
for a new challenge and video games were to be it. Simon joined UbiSoft Entertainment Inc. in 
Montreal January 2000 . As Technical Director & Chief Sound Engineer .over seeing the construc- 
tion of a multi studio audio and video facility. The Ubi Soft Montreal facility, since then .has cre- 
ated many popular video games including Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six, Raven Shield & Splinter 
Cell Series, Prince Of Persia: The Sands of Time, MystIV: Revelations, and Batman: Rise of Sin 
Tzu. All of these games were or will be released on multiple platforms, and are recognized indus- 
try wide as games of outstanding audio quality. Simon's role at Ubi Soft has grown to include 
artistic and musical direction, of Audio Designers and Composers. He's currently working with 
Peter Gabriel and Jack Wall on music for the Myst IV. and the sequels to Splinter Cell and Prince 
of Persia, making for an action packed year Panel: Mixing and Mastering Music and Sound for 
Games See page 45; Panel: Producing Orchestral Scores for Games See page 46 

Matt Pritchard 

Matt Pritchard, as an original employee of Ensemble Studios, programmed a significant portion 
of the company's first game Age of Empires and all of their games that have followed; Ace of 
Kings, Age of Mythology and their associated expansions. But even before that, Matt was active 
in the game development community, releasing high performance freeware graphic libraries and 
writing feature articles for the then fledgling Game Developer magazine. He has also made sev- 
eral contributions to the Game Programming Gems series of books and has been a speaker at 
numerous game developer conferences over the years. In addition to frequent presentations on 
matters of graphics, performance, and general game engine systems, Matt also authored a land- 
mark article on cheating in multiplayer games which was picked up on by an unusually broad 
range of media sources from Germany to Korea that included The New York Times, Slashdot, net- 
work administration journals, mainstream gaming magazines and even The Economist. Most 
recently Matt has been developing advanced console technology for an unannounced game 
series. On a lighter note. Matt is a console historian and owns the hardware development system 
used to create Frogger for the Atari 2600 Lecture: Deferred Shading on DX9 Class Hardware and 
the Xbox See page 96 

Kelcey Privett 

Kelcey Privett, Discreet animation specialist, is one of the most skilled 3ds max artists in the 
gaming industry. Kelcey is a former art director with Digital Anvil and has over ten years of game 
production experience on a variety of titles. For the past four years with Discreet, she's assisted 
numerous game developers in streamlining their pipeline and getting the most out of their 
tools Sponsored Session: Tips and Tricks for 3ds max 6 in Games See page 116 

Kent Quirk 

Kent Quirk is CTO and one of the founders of Cognitoy, an independent game company based in 



Acton, MA. Kent was the lead designer and developer of the acclaimed game Mindrover:The 
Europa Project. He is also the creator of the casual game 5 Card Dash, and consulted and con- 
tracted on a long list of game development projects for other companies, including Hasbro 
Interactive 's games.com web site and several startup game companies. He has been a software 
designer for more than 20 years, and currently codes in C++, Java, and Python. He has written 
three books and many technical articles. Tutorial: (334) Casual Games Summit See page 34 

Ron Radeztsky Jr. 

Ron Radeztsky received a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from the University of 
Wisconsin/Milwaukee, a Master's degree in Astrophysics from Princeton University, and a Ph.D. in 
Mechanical Engineering (1994) from Arizona State University. Ron joined the Boeing company 
and continued his research on boundary-layer transition, through experiments conducted at 
NASA-Langley Research Center. In 1995, Ron joined High-Technology corporation, where he 
researched aeroacoustic effects on high-lift systems, and developed an innovative photogram- 
metric system for non-intrusive aeroelastic measurements in wind-tunnel tests. In 1998, Ron 
joined the faculty at Arizona State University, where he continued his research and taught sever- 
al courses in fluid mechanics and aerodynamics. In 2001, Ron joined Rainbow Studios, where he 
has contributed to several of Rainbow's games, including Matt Hoffman's Pro BMX 2 and 
Splashdown: Rides Gone Wild. Lecture: Using Verlet Integration and Constraints in a Six Degree 
of Freedom Rigid Body Physics Simulation See page 108 

Bob Rafei 

Bobak Rafei is an 11-year veteran of the gaming industry, the art director, character animator, and 
senior visual development artist at Naughty Dog, lnc."Bob"joined NDI in early '95 while in the 
visual development stage of Crash Bandicoot, which paved the way for CB2.CB "Warped," and 
CTRfor PlayStation, collectively selling 22 million+ units worldwide. During development of Jak& 
DaxterThe Precursor Legacy and JakII for the PS2, Bob's responsibilities included leading visual 
development as well as contributing to character animations. He has lectured at Game 
Developers Conference ('01, '02) on the subject of character design, and has contributed writings 
to Animation Magazine and Animation World Network (AWN.com). Lecture: Jak's Makeover for 
JakII: Why the Dramatic New Look for a Sequel? See page 713; Lecture: From Script to Joystick: 
World-Building 101 See page 63 

Jim Ragonese 

Sponsored Session: Speech Recoginition for Games See page 46 

Bay Raitt 

Bay Raitt was responsible for modeling and building Gollum's facial system used in The Lord of 
the Rings trilogy for Weta Digital in New Zealand. In 2003, Bay was received a Visual Effects 
Society Award for his work on Gollum. Prior to moving to New Zealand. Bay was the product 
manager for the 3D animation system Mirai, and has worked as a digital puppeteer, modeling 
lead, animation supervisor, director and video game level designer. Bay can now be found at the 
Weta workshop as a designer and sculptor Lecture: Building Gollum See page 112 

Dave Ranyard 

Dave Ranyard of Sony Computer Entertainment Europe has been in the game industry for the 
last six years. Dave started out as an Al programmer at Psygnosis, later moving to SCEE's London 
Development Studio where he is currently the audio manager. He has worked on titles including 
Wip3out, Colony Wars, This is Football, and The Getaway. Prior to the game industry he lec- 
tured in Artificial Intelligence at the University of Leeds where he also gained a Ph.D. in the sub 
ject. Dave is a keen musician and he has written and produced many records over the past 10 
years and in 1998 took a career break to tour the U.S. and Europe with his band Supercharger. 
Tutorial: (347) Audio Boot Camp See page 36 

Mike Rasmussen 

Sponsored Session: Government Simulation in 3ds max See page 113 

Ashu Rege 

Ashu Rege is an Application Engineer at Nvidia. Prior to Nvidia, he worked at Paraform, Inc. where 
he was a lead engineer. He received his M.S. in Mechanical Engineering and Ph.D. in Computer 
Science from the University of California, Berkeley, and has published in various journals and con- 
ferences on geometric modeling, CAD, 3d graphics and networking Sponsored Session: Practical 
Performance Analysis and Tuning See page 103, Tutorial: (337) Advanced Visual Effects with 
Direct3D See page 33 

David Rejeski 

David Rejeski is the Director, Foresight and Governance Project at the Woodrow Wilson 
International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.. David was appointed the first Flum Scholar 
at the Wilson Center in July 2000. He heads The Serious Games Initiative which is housed at the 
Wilson Center. Prior to his work at Wilson Rejeski worked at the Environmental Protection 
Agency's Office of Policy (EPA), and in 1994 was assigned to the White House Office of Science 
and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEO). Rejeski's focus at 
the Wilson center concerns long-term challenges facing the United States as well as finding 
ways to make policymakers and government leaders think more insightfully about long term 
decision making. He feels that games are one tool that may help immensely in building long- 
term thinking skills among not only government officials but the general public at-large. 
Tutorial: (348) Serious Games Summit See page 31 

Roland Reyer 

Roland Reyer has been working with Alias since 1992. During this time, he has become an 
authority on training and consulting for Dynamics, Character Animation and MEL. Tutorial: (444) 
World Building in Maya See page 36 

Brian Reynolds 

Brian Reynolds of Big Huge Games, a 13-year industry veteran, is recognized as one of the indus- 
try's most talented and productive game designers. Honored by PC Gamer magazine as one of 
twenty-five "Game Gods," Brian has masterminded the design of an unbroken stream of hit 




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SPEAKER BIOS 






strategy games, including the million-plus-selling Civilization 
II and Alpha Centauri — and now Rise of Nations, the new 
real time strategy game from Big Huge Games and Microsoft. 
Highly regarded for his mastery of the art of programming, 
Reynolds' dual specialty gives him the substantial advantage 
of being able to bring his own visions to life — and he has built 
a reputation for finely tuned gameplay. As President of Big 
Huge Games, Brian concentrates on the creative side of the 
company. Working with the large and extraordinarily talented 
Big Huge team, as well as the considerable resources and 
expertise of Microsoft, Brian is extremely happy with the com- 
pany's first release, Rise of Nations (2003) Lecture: Al and 
Design: How Al Enables Designers See page 93 

Greg Richardson 

Greg Richardson joined Electronic Arts in 2003 as Vice 
President, Business Development. Prior to joining EA, Greg 
served as Senior Vice President, Product Development at Eidos 
Interactive. Prior to joining Eidos, he served as Chief Executive 
Officer at OUIO, a privately held Customer Relations 
Management software company. He also served as Vice 
President, Sales and Marketing at The 3DO Company. Greg 
earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from 
University of California, Berkeley Tutorial: (351) Developer 
Business Summit: An IGDA Think-Tank See page 37; Panel: 
Audio for Mobile See page 43 

Wyeth Ridgway 

Wyeth Ridgway has been obsessed with programming games 
since early childhood when he started programming on a 
Radio Shack TRS-80. In 1992, after studying Computer Science 
at the University of Arizona, he teamed up to found Ferris VR 
(now called VirTra Systems), a virtual reality software company 
specializing in location-based entertainment. While serving as 
technical director for four years, Wyeth developed and 
deployed numerous products to companies such as Disney 
and Six Flags. In 1996 Wyeth headed north to Seattle, eager to 
develop 3D technologies for personal computers. As technical 
director for Zombie Virtual Reality, Wyeth designed and built 
the Viper Engine, using the 3dfx chipset and got 3dfx's"Best 
Use of Technology" nomination for the top-selling game Spec 
Ops. In 1998 Wyeth returned to his native Arizona to found his 
second company. Leviathan Games. Now serving as Leviathan 
Games' president and technical director, Wyeth continues to 
pursue his lifelong passion for game development. Tutorial: 
(341) Web-Based 3D Gaming See page 33 

Brian Robbins 

Brian Robbins works for Fuel Industries, a developer of web 
applications and games, as senior creative technologist. Prior 
to joining Fuel he has worked with Worlds Apart Productions, 
developing The Lord of the Rings Online Trading Card 
Game, and at CleverMedia, creating more than 70 Shockwave 
and Flash games. Brian has presented at numerous industry 
conferences including GDC, WebDevCon, and Macromedia 
UCON. He is very involved in the game development commu- 
nity, contributing to the Online Games Whitepaper for several 
years, as well as helping run the Colorado IGDA chapter. He 
has a B.S. in Computer Science, and an M.B.A. from the 
University of Denver Roundtable: Web-Based Games 
Roundtable See page 77 

Victor Rodriguez 

Victor Rodriguez is a published author and former manage- 
ment executive at BMG Music Publishing and Sony Music. 
Victor is currently Sony Computer Entertainment America's 
music supervisor. Panel: Music Licensing for Videogames: How 
Popular Music and Artists Can Make Games Pop See page 54 

Dan Rogers 

Dan Lee Rogers is the president and founder of Bizdev, Inc. the 
premiere business management agency for independent soft- 
ware developers worldwide. For over a decade he has pio- 
neered business development for many of the world's most 
successful software publishers, including Sierra Online, Virgin 
Interactive, and IBM. Over his career, he has been associated 
with some of the biggest hits in the consumer interactive 
market. He was the marketing strategist behind such Sierra 
Online legends as Kings' Quest VI, Kings' Quest VII, 
Phantasmagoria, Gabriel Knight, Front Page Sports, 
Betrayal at Krondor. Police Quest, Aces over Europe, and 
more. As the director of marketing for Virgin Interactive, Dan 
released some of Virgin's most successful products ever, 
including The 11th Hour and the blockbuster hit Command 
and Conquer. Dan also served as the director of entertain- 
ment software for IBM, and as a software development gener- 
al manager for Sierra Online Lecture: The End Game: How Top 
Developers Sold Their Studios See page so 



Dion Rogers 

Dion Rogers has six years of game industry experience, having 
worked on more than 10 game titles. For the past four years, 
Dion has been a senior artist at Red Storm 
Entertainment/Ubisoft where he has worked as a level artist 
on Ghost Recon (PC/Xbox) and as a lead artist on Ghost 
Recon.- Desert Siege & Island Thunder. Dion has worked to 
establish the highest visual quality possible for Red Storm by 
setting the technical level-design requirements on his respec- 
tive projects. Dion is currently a lead technical artist on an 
unannounced console/PC project. Lecture: Tips & Tricks for UV 
Mapping See page 116 

Dave Rohrl 

Dave Rohrl has been producing and designing computer 
games for more than seven years at industry leaders like EA 
and The Learning Company. Since June of 2000, Dave has 
been making outstanding games for the casual players at 
Pogo.com and the AOL Games Channel. During that time, 
Dave has created some of the web's most popular and addic- 
tive games, including Word Whom p, Jumble Bees, and 
Hammerhead Pool. Tutorial: (334) Casual Games Summit See 
page 34 

Ramon Romero 

Ramon Romero is one of the founders of the user-testing 
group at Microsoft Game Studios. He has been working as a 
user-testing specialist since 1998 and as a Lead in the group 
since 2001. Ramon was the primary user-testing specialist for 
several notable titles including Mechwarrior 4. Munch's 
Oddysee, and NFL Fever 2004 as well as numerous others By 
2000 Ramon had already observed, analyzed, and reported on 
the experiences of more than 3000 users, at which point he 
stopped trying to track. Before starting at Microsoft, Ramon 
was a graduate student at the University of Washington, 
studying cognitive neuroscience (the linking of thought to 
actual brain function). Lecture: User-testing in a Hostile 
Environment: Overcoming Apathy and Resistance in Game 
Companies See page 88 

Ron Rose 

Ron Rose of Rose Rix & Bennett LLP has practiced immigration 
law for over twenty years specializing in high technology and 
entertainment clients. Over the years, Ron has represented 
many large publishers in the games industry including 
LucasArts and Take Two Interactive. He has also represented 
development companies such as Factor 5 as well as individu- 
als in the industry. Ron has extensive experience in handling 
matters for programmers generally, and games programmers 
specifically. He also has extensive experience handling 2D and 
3D graphics professionals both in the games industry as well 
as in the motion picture special effects area. In that regard. 
Ron has over the years handled immigration matters for some 
of the leading special effects houses including Industrial Light 
& Magic, Pixar, Rhythm & Hues, Digital Domain, Tippett 
Studios, and numerous others Lecture: Immigration for 
Foreign Games Professionals in the Age of Homeland Security 
See page 32 

David S. Rosenbaum 

David S. Rosenbaum counsels clients in the interactive, film, 
television, publishing, licensing and merchandising, and 
amusement industries. David is regularly involved in transac- 
tions ranging from development and publication of video and 
computer games and related technology licensing; mergers 
and acquisitions in the interactive industry; licensing and 
merchandising of brands, character, entertainment and sports 
properties; production, marketing, and distribution of films 
and television productions; and comic book licensing and 
publishing, David has negotiated agreements for his clients 
with leading videogame hardware manufacturers and pub- 
lishers, film studios, television networks, sports leagues, and 
book publishers. David lectures frequently on legal and busi- 
ness issues in developing and publishing video games, includ- 
ing at events offered by GDC, E3, and California Lawyers for 
the Arts. Tutorial: (357) Leveraging Development Deals to 
Build Value in Your Studio See page 36 

Gary Rosenzweig 

Gary Rosenzweig runs Clevermedia, a game development 
company in Denver, Colorado. Clevermedia has produced more 
than 250 web-based games since 1995. It runs four sites of 
games made with Shockwave and Flash. Clevermedia also 
produces commercial games, creates games for other compa- 
nies, and licenses games to other web sites. Gary's latest 
books are Special Edition Using Director MX, Flash MX 
ActionScriptfor Fun and Games, and Sams Teach Yourself Flash 



MX ActionScript in 24 Hours. You can see much of 
CleverMedia's content at www.clevermedia.com, 
www.flasharcade.com.www.gamescene.com, and www. 
gamespark.com Tutorial: (341) Web-Based 3D Gaming See 
page 33 

Prod ip to Roy 

Prodipto Roy has worked in the gaming industry in one form 
or another for the past 14 years. Starting as a designer and 
tester for role-playing, card, and board games, he eventually 
made the transition to software tester in Microsoft Game 
Studios. Since this time he has been most active in the FASA 
Studio, working on balancing the MechWarrior line of PC 
games. Tutorial: (331) Playtesting Strategies See page 32 

Jason Rubin 

See page 17 for bio. Panel: Interfacing With Hollywood: 
Challenges and Opportunties See page 33 

Leah Rubin 

Leah Rubin, Director of Human Resources, joined Radical 
Entertainment in 2000. Leah is responsible for meeting 
Radical's growing HR needs by ensuring the attraction, reten- 
tion and development of world class talent. Leah also provides 
direction and leadership support in all employment practice 
matters with an emphasis on HR best practices. She holds a 
Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from the University of British 
Columbia as well as a diploma in the Management of HR 
from the BC Institute of Technology where she graduated 
with honors. This spring she will be starting her MBA in HR at 
the esteemed Royal Roads University. Leah brings over 12 years 
of HR management experience, including senior positions at 
the world class Metropolitan Hotel and Surrey Metro Savings 
Credit Union. Since she joined Radical the company has won 
several awards including "Best Company to work for in BC", as 
selected by BC Business Magazine and "Canada's 50 Best 
Managed Private Companies", as selected by Arthur Andersen. 
Tutorial: (346) Human Resources Forum: Trends and Directions 
See page 33 

Stephen Rubin 

Stephen Rubin represents videogame developers, from start- 
ups to household names, in such matters as intellectual prop- 
erty protection and enforcement, contracts and licenses, liti- 
gation, employment law. and business formation, acquisitions 
and capital investments. Prior to establishing his own firm, he 
was in the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice, a 
professor of law at the University of Florida, and a partner at a 
national firm where he headed the antitrust and intellectual 
property groups. He has served as a special master and as a 
patent mediator in federal court proceedings. He is the author 
of several books and a number of articles on antitrust and 
intellectual property Lecture: Minefields in Videogame 
Intellectual Property Protection See page 33 

Jari Saarhelo 

Sponsored Session: Creating Local Interactive Games for N- 

Gage See page 96 

Masahiro Sakurai 

Masahiro Sakurai joined HAL at the age of 19, and went on to 
develop Kirby's Dreamland (Game Boy), Kirby's Adventure 
(NES), Super Smash Brothers (N64), and Super Smash 
Brothers Melee (Gamecube). Masahiro is now indepedent, 
and developing games across platforms Lecture: Game 
Design: Risk and Return See page 64 

Katie Salen 

Katie Salen is a game studies scholar and critic. Katie is cur- 
rently co-authoring a textbook on game design for MIT Press, 
and has taught courses on game design at the University of 
Texas and Parsons School of Design. She currently writes a col- 
umn for RES magazine on digital games and culture. Katie has 
written extensively on game design and game culture and 
recently contributed to the catalog for GameON, an exhibition 
on the history and culture of videogames at the Barbican 
Gallery in London, and is co-creator of Conduit, a forthcoming 
animated series on the Sci-Fi channel focusing on videogame 
cinematics. Tutorial: (332) Game Design: The 100 Year Summit 
See page 34 

Steve Salyer 

Tutorial: (357) Leveraging Development Deals to Build Value in 

Your Studio See page 36 

George Sanger 

George Alistair Sanger.The Fat Man. has been creating music 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of GDC 2004. 



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SPEAKER BIOS 



and other audio for games for the past 20 years. George has contributed to the atmosphere of 
more than 200 games, including such sound-barrier-breaking games as Loom, Wing 
Commander I and II, and The 7th Guest. Throughout his unparalleled career, he has continually 
advanced the art technically and artistically He created the first General MIDI soundtrack for a 
game, the first direct-to-MIDI live recording of musicians, the first redbook soundtrack included 
with the game as a separate disk, the first music for a game that was considered a "work of art." 
the first soundtrack that was considered a selling point for a game, and the first context-sensi- 
tive soundtrack to attract industry attention. George is also the founder and host of the presti- 
gious interactive audio thinktank, Project Bar-B-Q, the audio advisor to Came Developer maga- 
zine, and the first member of NARAS based on CD ROM work. Lecture: Cross-Platform Audio 
Using Interactive XMF See page 43 

Tobi Saulnier 

Tobi Saulnier is the vice president of Product Development at Vicarious Visions. Tobi first learned 
about play testing while developing a number of well-received children's Gameboy Color games, 
including Blues Clues GBC. Rescue Heroes GBC, and zoboomafoo GBC. She remembers well the 
first time she watched a four-year-old struggle to play what had seemed until then to be a 
ridiculously easy game! Subsequently, she developed the kid testing program at Vicarious Visions 
as a way to get designers more and faster feedback on the impact of design tradeoffs on players 
other than themselves. During the past two years she has learned quite a lot about testing 
games with kids, and Vicarious Visions has gotten quite organized (and smarter) about it. Tobi 
also has had extensive experience as a facilitator, which is critical to providing an interesting 
roundt able experience Roundtable: Thievery or Flattery: Ethics and IP Rights See page yg 

Ben Sawyer 

Ben Sawyer is a co-conspirator behind The Serious Games Initiative (www.senousgames.org). He 
is the volunteer producer of the first Serious Games Summit held at the GDC. Sawyer is also 
president of Digitalmill, Inc. a Portland, ME based consulting he helped found in 1997. Digitalmill 
has worked on a number of game projects and served as producer for the Virtual U project, a 
serious game-simulation about university management that was an 2001 Independent Games 
Festival finalist. Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 31 

Marc Schaefgen 

Marc Schaefgen is a 13 year veteran of the game audio community. Having worked on such titles 
as Wing Commander I and II, Ultima VII, Turok(s), and many, many others, Marc has accumulat- 
ed much experience and is always refining his development process. Marc is currently the audio 
director for Inevitable Entertainment. He is an active member of G.A.N.G. and serves on the 
sound design peer panel for the AIAS, as well as being active in other game development organi- 
zations Panel: Audio Asset Management for Large Projects See page 42, The Hobbit: A Case 
Study See page 44 

Tim Schafer 

Tim Schafer is the president of Double Fine Productions, creators of the action/adventure game 
Psvchonauts. Prior to Double Fine, Tim was a project leader at LucasArts Entertainment 
Company, where he was responsible for several adventure games, including Full Throttle and 
Grim Fandango. Tim also co-designed Day of the Tentacle, and served as a writer and assistant 
designer on The Secret of Monkey Island 1 & 2. Adventures in Character Design See page 60 



John Schappert 

See page 49 for bio Keynote: Prepping for the Transition - 



Will You be Ready? See page 49 



Jesse Schell 

Jesse Schell is a professor of entertainment technology at Carnegie Mellon, specializing in game 
design. Formerly, he was creative director of the Walt Disney Imagineering VR Studio, where his 
job was to invent the future of interactive entertainment for the Walt Disney Company. Jesse 
worked and played there for seven years as designer, programmer, and manager on several proj- 
ects for Disney theme parks and Disneyquest (Disney's chain of VR entertainment centers). His 
most recent work at Disney involves design of family-friendly massively multiplayer worlds, such 
as Disneys Toontown Online. He came to the ETC to impart real-world experience, and to build 
exciting new things. He has a B.S.C.S. from Rensselaer, and an M.S. I.N. degree from Carnegie 
Mellon In a previous existence, he was writer, director, performer.juggler, comedian, and circus 
artist for both Freihofer's Mime Circus and the Juggler's Guild Panel: SciFi MMPs: Lessons from 
Galaxies and Earth and Beyond See page 68 

Dan Scherlis 

Dan Scherlis is CEO of Etherplay, developers and publishers of premium mobile games. Dan is an 
advisor to game developers Floodgate, Realm, Froghop, and Cognitoy. and an associate of venture 
advisors MTGP. For Comverse Mobile Entertainment, he directed content strategy Dan was CEO 
of Turbine Entertainment, developers of massively multiplayer games (Microsoft's Asheron's 
Call). For Papyrus (now a Vivendi studio) Dan established and led game-publishing operations 
Indycar Racing. Dan created online publications for Ziff-Davis for Interactive/AT&T, and led mar- 
ket analysis at HBO. A contributing editor for Mobile Entertainment Analyst, Dan holds A.B., A.M.. 
and MBA. degrees from Harvard Lecture: Mobile Games: Lessons from Online Games See page 
53 Tutorial: (334) Casual Games Summit See page 34 

Vincent Scheurer 

Vincent Scheurer is an associate at the London office of law firm Osborne Clarke Vincent has 
practised law in the interactive entertainment field for five years, first as an in-house lawyer and 
then in private practise. Vincent speaks regularly on legal and business issues relating to games 
development, most recently during the Milia 2002 Think Tank summit. He acts for a number of 
high profile game development companies in the U.K. and abroad Lecture: Doing Business with 
Europe: A Survivor's Guide See page so 

Wade Schin 

Wade Schin has been a technical artist at Rockstar San Diego since 2001, most recently working 
on Midnight Club II for PS2/XBOX/PC. Previous experience includes 2 years at SCEA, and a stint 
in college as an SGI system administrator. He can often be found playing Scrabble at the commu- 



nity center on Saturday mornings Tutorial: (350) The Art of Modeling and Animating Triple A 
Titles in Maya See page 34; Lecture: Maya for Games: Tools & Pipelines in Maya See page 114 

Brian Schmidt 

See Advisory Board page 18. Tutorial: (347) Audio Boot Camp See page 36. Panel: The State of 
Non-Linear Audio for Interactive Media See page 46 

Steve Schnur 

Steve Schnur, as Worldwide Executive of Music and Audio for Electronic Arts, works closely with 
EA production, publishing teams and the international record industry to supervise and select in- 
game music for EA Games, EA Sports Big and EA Sports franchises. A 15-year music industry vet- 
eran, Steve has brought both established stars and new breakthrough artists that include Snoop 
Dogg, Avril Lavigne, DMX, Fabolous, Sum 41. Nelly, Jimmy Eat World. Good Charlotte. Queens Of 
The Stone Age, Blink 182, Nappy Roots, Radiohead, Fat Boy Slim and scores more to EA Games, 
and was recently selected by Entertainment Weekly in their 2003 "It" issue as One Of the 100 
Most Creative People In Entertainment for his work in bringing together the worlds of music and 
gaming. His accomplishments include managing the EA Trax initiatives which resulted in the 
first RIAA certified platinum video game soundtrack with NBA Live 2003, as well as helping to 
establish the collaborative partnership with legendary hip-hop lifestyle company Def Jam to pro- 
duce the top-selling, ground-breaking Def Jam Vendetta Panel: Music Publishing: A Primer for 
Game Developers and Composers See page S4. Panel: Producing Orchestral Scores for Games See 
page 46 

Kathy Schoback 

Kathy Schoback, as director of external publishing and development at Sega, oversees relation- 
ships with Sega's external North American developers and publishing partners. She has served in 
various roles in her tenure at Sega, including head of Dreamcast third-party publisher manage- 
ment, regional sales, and consumer service. Kathy has also worked on the Game Developers 
Conference as part of the management team, and is currently a board member of the 
International Game Developers Association Tutorial: (351) Developer Business Summit: An IGDA 
Think-Tank See page 31 

Damion Schubert 

Damion Schubert has been working with MUDs and online games for more than a decade 
Damion got his start in the industry on Meridian 59. a pioneer in Internet gaming. After a stint 
at Origin serving as the lead designer of the now defunct Ultima Online 2, Damion founded a 
startup which offered design consulting to several companies, while developing its own online 
title, Hollyworld. Damion has since found a home at Wolfpack Studios, where he now resides as 
producer over the title Shadowbane, which launched in March, 2003 Roundtable: The Power of 
Collectibles: Leveraging Your Player's Inner Obsessive-Compulsive See page 67 

Eric Schuh 

Eric "Grue" Schuh is a user-testing lead at Microsoft Game Studios. A 10-year usability veteran, 
Eric spent the first part of his career doing usability research for a variety of productivity applica- 
tions and web sites before succumbing to the siren call of game research. During that "dark 
period", Eric developed Microsoft-wide guidelines on conducting effective and useful usability 
testing Since joining Microsoft Game Studios, Eric has provided user-testing support on titles 
ranging from Project Gotham Racing 2 to Grabbed by the Ghoulies. Eric had no idea that he 
would be doing user research on games when he left the Social Psychology program at the 
University of Washington more than 10 years ago, but he thanks his lucky stars every day. 
Tutorial: (359) Do-it-Yourself Usability: A Crash Course on User-Testing See page 34 

Jason Schultz 

Jason Schultz is a Staff Attorney specializing in intellectual property and reverse engineering. 
Prior to joining EFF, Schultz worked at the law firm of Fish & Richardson PC, where he spent 
most of his time invalidating software patents and defending open source developers in law 
suits. While at F&R, he co-authored an amicus brief on behalf of the Internet Archive, Prelinger 
Archives, and Project Gutenberg in support of Eric Eldred's challenge to the Sonny Bono 
Copyright Term Extension Act. During law school, Schultz served as Managing Editor of the 
Berkeley Technology Law Journal and helped found the Samuelson Clinic, the first legal clinic in 
the country to focus on high tech policy issues and the public interest. Schultz also has under- 
graduate degrees in Public Policy and Women's Studies from Duke University. Jason maintains a 
personal blog at lawgeek.net Panel: Audio for Mobile Panel See page 43 

Paul Schuytema 

Paul Schuytema has been designing and crafting games since he created his first miniature 
rules-set for ancient era battles in 1974. Since his first days of design, he has created more than 
50 games, authored more than 200 professional articles, and written more than a dozen books. 
Paul is currently the chief creative officer and president of Magic Lantern Playware (MLP), where 
he has produced, designed, and shipped five games in the last two years. MLP. founded in late 
1998, is located in rural Illinois, with an additional office in Dallas, Texas. In addition, Paul is cur- 
rently working with the city and state government to create the Patton Block Center, an info-tech 
incubator situated within a restored historic landmark which will foster the growth of the com- 
puter game development industry in rural Monmouth, IL Tutorial: (333) Creativity Boot Camp See 
page 32 

Donald Seegmiller 

Don Seegmiller is one of the top living figurative artists in the United States with paintings in 
more than 400 collections. He is represented by Wadle Galleries Ltd. Of Santa Fe, New Mexico, 
Articles about Don and his work have appeared in all major western art magazines. He is on the 
faculty at Brigham Young University, where he teaches "Senior level lllustration,""Painting the 
Human Head," "Figure Drawing," and "Digital Painting." Don was Art Director of Saffire 
Corporation for the last six years. Saffire was a leading videogame developer located Utah. His 
art has been featured in Spectrum 7 and 8, Design Graphics. Magazine, and Step by Step Electronic 
Design and the Painter 6 and 7 Wow Book. He wrote Character Design and Digital Figure Painting 
for Charles River Media. He writes software reviews for magazines, Critical Depth web site, and is 
a regular speaker at the Game Developers Conference. Tutorial: (344) Creativity in Creature and 
Character Design Seegmiller See page 35 




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SPEAKER BIOS 



Scott Selfon 

Scott Selfon is the Xbox audio content consultant, assisting 
composers, sound designers, and audio programmers with 
technical and creative implementation issues in their Xbox 
titles. His prior experiences include being the test lead for 
Directmusic Producer and DirectX Audio Scripting, and work- 
ing as a program manager on the MSN Creative Audio team, 
which focused on the sonification of web content using inter- 
active soundtracks. Selfon has composed music for a wide 
range of media, including film, television, PC titles, and live 
performance. Scott is the principal violist of several Seattle- 
area orchestras and ensembles, and is the artistic director of 
an a cappella group at the University of Washington. Scott is 
an alumnus of the University of Southern California, where he 
obtained dual degrees in music composition (film scoring 
emphasis) and computer engineering/computer science. 
Tutorial: (347) Audio Boot Camp See page 36, Lecture: Audio 
Concepts in Plain English: 3D and I3DL2 See page 42 

Larry Shapiro 

Larry Shapiro is an agent in the Motion Picture Department of 
Creative Artists Agency (CAA), a literary and talent agency 
based in Beverly Hills, CA. At CAA, Shapiro is in charge of all 
game initiatives focusing on integrating the videogame 
industry with the motion picture and television industries in 
order to create the next generation of cross-platform franchis- 
es. Recently, Shapiro has been responsible for setting up 
movies for such game franchises as Mechwarrior, Return to 
Castle Wofenstein, Doom, and Dead to Rights, which will 
star Nick Cage. Shapiro has also created a TV development 
deal for Will Wright at Fox Television and set up the Snake 
Plisken game franchise for Namco with John Carpenter and 
Kurt Russell. Before joining CAA, Shapiro worked as vice presi- 
dent and general manager of Stromlo Entertainment, a com- 
puter game company in Melbourne, Australia, that was an 
affiliate label to Electronic Arts Australia. Panel: Interfacing 
With Hollywood: Challenges and Opportunties See page S3 

Brian Sharp 

Brian Sharp of Ion Storm has worked in and around the game 
industry for something like seven years now. He worked for 
Cognitoy on their first title. MindRover, and subsequently 
headed to 3dfx to work on OpenCL drivers. He's currently at 
Ion Storm in Austin. TX, where he's coding up engine technol- 
ogy for Thief 3 and Deus Ex: Invisible War. He occasionally 
writes for Came Developer magazine and contributes regular- 
ly to the Came Developers Conference Lecture: The Physics- 
Sound System of Deus Ex: Invisible War and Thief 3 See page 
103 

Jez Sherlock 

Jez Sherlock is a game programming and development veter- 
an of 16 years and has developed games on every major gam- 
ing platform and for most major publishers. Jeremy is 
presently working for Electronic Arts Canada Roundtable: 
Visual Effects Roundtable See page 176 

Erik Simon 

Erik Simon, starting out as a gamer as early as 1979, has 
hands-on experience with every aspect of game development 
except hard-core programming. He worked as a graphic artist, 
game designer, level designer, and project lead on more than 
a dozen of released titles and has been responsible as a man- 
ager for many more. Most of his work has been done on home 
computer formats, although he's been involved in console 
development. As a co-founder of Thalion Software in 
Gutersloh, Germany, Erik worked from '88 to '94 as a graphic 
artist, game designer, project lead and later head of develop- 
ment on a range of titles on Atari ST, Commodore Amiga, and 
PC From '94 to '00 at Blue Byte Software in Mulheim an der 
Ruhr, Germany, he's been a graphic artist, game designer, and 
project lead there, taking on the role of head of development 
from 1998 Since 2001, Erik has been with J0W00D Productions 
as head of development Lecture: Winning the Race Against 
Pirates And Crackers: Next Generation Copy Protection See 
page 89 

Peter-Pike Sloan 

Peter-Pike Sloan recently moved from the Graphics Group in 
Microsoft Research, where he had been for the previous four 
years, to the DirectX Group. Prior to working at Microsoft 
Peter was a staff member in the Scientific Computing and 
Imaging Group at the University of Utah and has worked at 
Evans & Sutherland as well as Parametric Technologies. He is 
interested in most aspects of computer graphics and most of 
his publications are available at www.research.microsoft.com. 
Lecture: Advanced Real-Time Reflectance See page 92 



Harvey Smith 

Harvey Smith is the project director of DX2: Invisible War and 
was lead designer on the award winning Deus Ex. Previously, 
he worked as lead designer of FireTeam (an Internet squad 
game), and since 1993 he has worked in various roles on such 
games as System Shock, CyberMace.Technosaur (a termi 
nated RTS game) and the CD version of Ultima VIII: Pagan A 
life-long Texan, he was born in the industrial wastelands 
south of Houston, but presently lives in the psychically and 
environmentally healthy climes of Austin. His wife, Rebekah, 
teaches fifth grade, and they have two super-spoiled dogs, 
Loki and Star Tutorial: {353) Game Tuning Workshop See page 
31, Lecture: Would the Real Emergent Gameplay Please Stand 
Up? See page 77 

Randy Smith 

Randy Smiih is the project director of Thief 3 at Ion Storm in 
Austin, Texas. Randy began his career as a designer at Looking 
Glass Studios in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He believes in 
design formalism and is working towards a common design 
vocabulary. He really likes games with meaningful player 
expression and thinks a lot about how to design them. 
Lecture: Would the Real Emergent Gameplay Please Stand 
Up? See page 77 

Stephan Smith 

Stephan Smith has been directly involved with PC gaming and 
retail distribution for more than n years, winning numerous 
awards, along with developing innovative retail sales strate- 
gies. In 2002, he formed Freshgames to specifically develop 
and market casual games through electronic distribution. 
Their first game Cubis was a runaway success, followed by 
Word Mojo and FreakOut. Stephan oversees development, 
marketing, licensing, and distribution of the company's soft- 
ware. He is a marketing graduate of Ohio State University 
Tutorial: (334) Casual Games Summit See page 34 

Kira Snyder 

Kira Snyder designs and writes for games and social environ- 
ments. As Senior Designer at There, Inc.. she develops games 
and interactive content as well as tools for users to create 
their own games and activities in a persistent social space. 
She led story and game design on Majestic for Electronic Arts 
and produced online community for ZDTV (now TechTV) She 
has created narratives, virtual worlds, and games for 
Microsoft, Purple Moon, Tooned In, and Rules of Play, published 
by MIT Press Tutorial: (332) Multiplayer Play: Designing Social 
Interaction in Games See page 34 

Jeremy Soule 

Jeremy Soule is a critically acclaimed composer and musician. 
He heads Artistry Entertainment, a distinguished leader in 
music production for the interactive entertainment industry. 
According to 2002 figures furnished by wwwNPD.com, 
Artistry Entertainment is the most distributed provider of 
original "film-quality" music for the game industry. This 
accomplishment includes more than ten major releases and 
as many as six top-sellers composed for five of the world's 
largest publishers. Jeremy's award-winning, orchestral sound- 
tracks have elevated the standard of music in the interactive 
entertainment industry to a level previously limited to the 
motion picture genre. Most recently, Jeremy's score for The 
Elder Scrolls 3:Morrowind was nominated for "Game 
Soundtrack of the Year" in Came Industry News (www.gamein- 
dustry.com). Soule also created the original score for Harry 
Potter and the Chamber of Secrets for EA, which won the 
IGN 2002 award for Best Adventure Game Panel: The Virtual 
and Mixed Media Orchestra for Game Music See page 47 

Matt Spall 

Matt Spall is CEO and Co-founder or Morpheme Ltd, one of 
the most respected developers of games for mobile phones. 
Spall's games development history dates back to the late 80s 
working on classic arcade conversions including the classic 
shooter Silkworm and wide screen fight game The Ninja 
Warriors Panel: Great Games in 50k: Three Addictive Mobile 
Phone Titles See page 65 

Seth Spaulding 

Seth Spaulding of Cyberlore Studios is an eight-year veteran 
of the game industry After graduating from Washington 
University with an illustration B.F.A. he worked for a D.C. 
graphics contractor doing projects for a variety of agencies 
and companies. Arriving at Cyberlore in 1995. Seth became art 
director in 1996 and vice president in 2003 Roundtable: Lead 
Artists Roundtable See page 114 



Warren Spector 

Warren Spector received a B.S. in Speech from Northwestern 
and an MA. in Radio-TV-Film from the University of Texas, 
Austin. In 1983, just shy of a Ph.D. in Communication, Warren 
joined Steve Jackson Games, rising to Editor-in-Chief before 
moving to TSR in 1987. There he worked on a variety of board 
games and RPGs as well as writing a novel, The Hollow Earth 
Affair Warren left papergaming in 1989 to join ORIGIN. There 
he co-produced Ultima VI and Wing Commander and pro- 
duced Ultima Underworld 1 and 2, Ultima VII: Serpent Isle, 
System Shock, Wings of Glory, Bad Blood, Martian Dreams 
and others. In 1997, after a year as producer of Thief and GM 
of the LookingGlass Austin office, Warren started Ion Storm- 
Austin. Warren was project director on Ion's award-winning 
action/RPG, Deus Ex, published by Eidos in June 2000, later 
reissued in a 2001 Game of the Year edition and, in 2002, as 
Deus Ex:The Conspiracy on PS2. As studio director, he cur- 
rently oversees development on Deus Ex 2: Invisible War and 
Thief III, both scheduled for release in 2003. From 2000 to 
2002, Warren served on the International Game Developers 
Association board. He remains co-chair of the IGDA's 
Education Committee Panel: Game Design Challenge: The 
Love Story See page 64. Lecture: Game Narrative: What Would 
Aristotle Do? See page 6s 

John Spitzer 

John Spitzer is director of Developer Technology at Nvidia 
Corporation where he oversees development of tools, technol 
ogy, art and educational materials for the 3D software devel- 
opment community world-wide. John collaborates with game 
developers on a daily basis, evaluating the technology in their 
games and assisting in the implementation of advanced visu- 
al effects. John has participated in a number of industry stan- 
dards committees relating to 3D graphics including the 
OpenGL Architectural Review Board (ARB) and serving as a 
founding member and Chair of the SPEC OpenGL Performance 
Characterization (SPECopc) organization. While serving on 
SPECopc, John defined, designed and implemented the indus- 
try standard SPECglperf benchmark. John presents at many 
developer educational events each year on topics ranging 
from performance optimization to advanced shading tech- 
niques. John holds bachelors and masters degrees in comput- 
er science from Rice University Tutorial: (340) Advanced 
OpenGL Tutorial See page 35 

Maarten Spruijt 

Maarten Spruijt studied Music Technology at the Faculty of 
Art, Media & Technology, in Hilversum, part of the School of 
Arts Utrecht, The Netherlands. Here he got his Master degree 
in "Composition in Context," cum laude. During his years at 
this school Maarten studied composition, scoring for the 
media, orchestration, production, and built a firm knowledge 
of modern music technology. He composed the scores for a 
number of Dutch film productions including The Wretched 
(Martijn Smits), Thorn & Alice (Jonas Klinkenbijl), and Tsar, 
among others. In 2002 Maarten teamed up with songwriter 
Vincent Beijer and composer Marco Deegenaars founding 
Project SAM, a music company developing, producing, and 
selling music sample libraries. By 2003, Project SAM has devel- 
oped three dedicated orchestral sample libraries. SAM Horns, 
SAM Trombones and SAM Trumpets, which are sold interna- 
tionally through Project SAM's own online shop and by a 
number of major, worldwide distributors (Soundsonline, Time 
& Space, Bestservice) Panel: The Virtual and Mixed Media 
Orchestra for Game Music See page 47 

David Squire 

David Squire is the founder of U.K. based Desq Software 
(www.desq.co.uk). Desq has produced a number of game- 
based education and online learning projects for a wide vari- 
ety of clients including BBC Digital Media. David previously 
worked in further education in the UK, setting up community 
based learning projects and experimenting with online learn- 
ing for community development, as well as teaching IT and 
media skills. Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 37 

Kurt Squire 

Kurt Squire is an Assistant Professor in Educational 
Communications and Technology at the University of 
Wisconsin and a Visiting Research Fellow at MIT. Squire holds 
a PhD in Instructional Systems Technology from Indiana 
University and is a former elementary and Montessori 
teacher. Squire's dissertation focused on how playing 
Civilization III mediated students' understandings of social 
studies. For the past two years, Squire has been a key member 
of MIT's Games-to-Teach Project and The Education Arcade. 
Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 37 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



■138- 



www.gdconf.com 



SPEAKER BIOS 



Eskil Steenberg- 

Eskil Steenberg of Oual Solaar is a graphics programmer / researcher. At the age of 17 he started 
in the game industry and has spent the last years as a graphics researcher. Eskil has developed 
tools such as Loq Airou and the network protocol verse. Currently he is working on a major EU 
research project, heading Blenders next generation effort, and is an OpenGL ARB participant. 
Lecture: Real-time Global Illumination See page 105 

Tim Stellmach 

Tim Stellmach is design group manager at Vicarious Visions Inc. in Troy, NY, where he has most 
recently acted as project leader for Jedi Knight: Jedi Academy and Doom 3 (Xbox). He started in 
the game industry as a playtester for Ultima Underworld (PC) in 1992. At Lookingglass Studios, 
he was the lead designer of Ultima Underworld II, Thief, and Thief II (PC), and also a member of 
the design teams for Terra Nova and System Shock (PC) Tim holds a B.S. in Math with Computer 
Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Lecture: Beyond Fun: Setting Aesthetic 
Goals and Sticking to Them See page 61, Lecture: Cross-Platform User Interface Development See 
page 62, Tutorial: (353) Game Tuning Workshop See page 31 

Jacob Stephens 

Jacob Stephens entered the games industry in 1996 to work as a Level Designer for LucasArts 
Entertainment. After creating levels for Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II (PC), Jedi Knight: Mysteries 
of the Sith (PC) and Star Wars: Episode I Racer (N64/PC), he worked briefly as a 3D Artist creat- 
ing backgrounds for Escape from Monkey Island (PC/PS2) before rejoining with Jedi-alums 
Nihilistic Software, Inc. to work as a designer on Vampire: The Masquerade (PC). Jacob's current 
role is lead designer at Nihilistic, overseeing all design aspects for their next title, StarCraft: 
Ghost (XB0X/PS2/GC). As is typical of small companies, people tend to wear many hats around 
Nihilistic. Some of Jacob's duties involve interfacing with audio designers and balancing game 
data and managing sounds. Panel: Audio Asset Management for Large Projects See page 42 

Andrew Stern 

Andrew Stern of lnteractivestory.net is currently collaborating with Michael Mateas in the devel- 
opment of Facade, an attempt to move beyond traditional branching or hyper-linked narrative to 
create a fully-realized, one-act interactive drama. Previously Andrew was a designer and pro- 
grammer of the interactive characters Dogz.Catz, and Babyz from PF.Magic in San Francisco, with 
more than two million units sold worldwide. He has presented these projects at a variety of con- 
ferences including the Game Developers Conference 1997 and 1998, Digital Arts and Culture, SIG- 
GRAPH 2000 Art Gallery, AAAI Narrative Intelligence Symposium, Autonomous Agents, and 
Intelligent User Interfaces. Babyz won a Silver Invision 2000 award for Best Overall Design for 
CDRom. Catz received a Design Distinction in the first annual I.D. Magazine Interactive Media 
Review, and along with Dogz and Babyz was part of the American Museum of Moving Image's 
Computer Space exhibit in New York. The projects have been written about in The New York 
Times, Time Magazine, Wired, and Al Magazine. Lecture: Beyond Finite State Machines: Managing 
Complex, Intermixing Behavior Hierarchies See page 94 

Eddo Stern 

Panel: ArtModJam See page 60 

Joe Stinchcomb 

Joe Stinchcomb, educated in the world of science and engineering at Perdue University, Joe has 
fused his love of art and entertainment with his passion for technology. Starting on video games 
in 1997 at a small company outside Chicago, Joe had the opportunity to work from start to finish 
on LEGO Racers (PC, PlayStation, and N64) among other projects. Later he moved from the world 
of consoles to the world of arcades when he joined Midway Games in downtown Chicago. A first 
hand view of these varying approached to game creation allowed him to experience several 
styles of production pipelines, and more specifically to understand the need for a streamlined 
approach. Currently serving as technical director for Rockstar, San Diego (formerly Angel Studios), 
he spends most of his time acting as half "junior programmer" and half "artist" Sponsored 
Tutorial: (444) World Building in Maya See page 36 

Lex Story 

Lecture: Tips & Tricks for UV Mapping See page v6 

Bryan Stout 

Bryan Stout has worked in the fields of artificial intelligence, doing research and applications for 
the University of Illinois and for Martin Marietta, and of computer games, first for MicroProse 
and then on a freelance basis. Since that time he has combined both passions as a writer, 
explaining how Al techniques work and can be applied to games. He has lectured on game Al 
topics at the GDC, Software Development, and Develop! Conferences, and at AAAI symposia and 
workshops; his articles on game Al have appeared in Came Developer magazine and Came 
Programming Cems. His recent activity has been on a book on game Al, the first volume of which 
will appear soon. This volume focuses on two major topics: embodied autonomous agents, their 
architecture and necessary abilities of sensing, memory, and action: and the many aspects of 
agent motion and pathfinding, simple or complex, planned or unplanned, static or dynamic, sin- 
gle or multiple agent Lecture: Artificial Potential Fields for the Control of Navigation and 
Animation See page 93, Roundtable: Embodied Autonomous Agents See page 97 

Bill Swartz 

Bill Swart started in the industry immediately after college, working in product development for 
Koei in Japan and then as marketing manager for Koei America. He went on to become a senior 
vice president at Activision and the managing director of Activision Japan. Over the course of 12 
years Bill took Activision Japan from a single desk to more than $65 million a year in revenues, 
making it both the first (and until recently the only) foreign capitalized game firm to succeed in 
Japan and one of Activision's most profitable units. Bill is currently "Head Woof" (president) at 
Mastiff Games, a newly established publisher, and enjoying life in San Francisco Lecture: Follow 
The Money: Understanding Console Publishers See page 51 

Marc Szafran 

Marc Szafran is senior vice president and general counsel of the Entertainment Software Rating 



Board (ESRB), which assigns content-based ratings for virtually all computer and videogames 
sold in the United States. He served as interim executive director of the ESRB for most of 2002. 
Prior to joining ESRB, Marc was assistant general counsel for the New York City Department of 
Information Technology and Telecommunications where he was responsible for telecommunica- 
tions and technology franchising and business and legal policy for the City. A graduate of 
Benjamin N.Cardozo School of Law, Marc is a Howard M. Squadron Law, Media, and Society 
Fellow and has testified on Internet privacy issues before the House Subcommittee on Courts 
and Intellectual Property. He is the author of articles published by the Cardozo Arts and 
Entertainment Law Journal and the Columbia Institute for Tele-Information. Lecture: ESRB 
Explained: Behind the Ratings See page 74 

Tommy Tallarico 

See page 18 for bio Lecture: Budget Audio: "What am I forgetting?" See page 45, Panel: 

Producing Orchestral Scores for Games See page 46 

Stephen Theodore 

Steve Theodore has been an animator for more than 10 years. After working in video and interac- 
tive productions he got into the game business with FASA Interactive in Chicago, where he 
worked on cinematics for Mech Commander and other Mech games. In 1997 he moved to Valve, 
where he worked on Half-Life, Team Fortress, and Counterstrike. He now works as a research 
animator at Rad Game Tools Roundtable: Beyond the Rubber Pencil: State of the Art Tools See 
page ill; Lecture: Character Rigger's Cookbook See page 112 

David Thomas 

David Thomas has covered popular culture, arts, and music for the past 15 years. During the past 
five years he has written game reviews and criticism for the Denver Post. He now teaches a 
course on critical videogame theory at the University of Colorado. Denver. He is also developing a 
course of study in game criticism and working on a book on the subject Group Gathering: 
Journalists' Group Gatherings See page 76 

Jack Thorpe 

Jack Thorpe currently consults mostly on advanced defense technology programs. He served as 
an R&D officer in the Air Force for 26 years. Half of that was at the Defense Advanced Research 
Projects Agency (DARPA) as a program manager, involved in a portfolio of fun projects: 
MicroTravel, Video Arcade Trainers, DeskTop Simulators, Seamless Simulation, the Electronic Sand 
Table, the 60% Solution, the Defense Simulation Internet, Interactive History (e.g., "Battle of 73 
Easting, ") and SIMNET Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 31 

Wade Tinney 

Wade Tin ney is a game designer, sound designer, and a founding partner of the New York City 
based game developer Large Animal (www.largeanimal.com). Large Animal develops original 
web-based, downloadable mobile games. Their puzzle game AlphaQueue is a finalist in this 
year's Independent Games Festival. Large Animal also develops games for clients such as LEGO, 
Mattel, MTV, AOL/Time-Warner. and the New York Philharmonic. Wade has taught game design 
to both undergraduate and graduate students at Parsons School of Design, where he also earned 
an M.F.A. in interactive design Panel: The State of the Web and Downloadable Games Industry 
See page S7 

Phil Tippett 

See page no for bio. Keynote: The History of Animation See page no 

Tom Tolles 

Tom Tolles is the president and co-founder of House Of Moves motion capture studios. Although 
Tom has been working directly in motion capture for more than four years, he has also been 
involved in the CG industry for 15 years. In the mid-to-late '80s, he was the co-founder of FTI 
West, an animation production company that was located in San Francisco. Prior to forming 
House of Moves, Tom was vice president, Sales & Marketing, Viewpoint DataLabs. Tom is a gradu 
ate of the Anderson School of Management ('91) and also holds a B.S.M.E./M.S.M.E. from 
Stanford f8i/'82) Lecture: Producing Motion Capture and Animation See page 86 

Paul Topolos 

PaulTopolos began his career as an unsuccessful children's book illustrator before taking a job at 
LucasArts Entertainment. Starting as a story board artist with little experience with computers 
he went on to be a texture painter, background modeler, concept artist, matte painter, and art 
director working on on many critically successful titles, like Grim Fandango and The Rogue 
Squadron series. At Lucasfilm, he was a story board artist on Star Wars Episode I, and on Episode 
II was a matte painter with the innovative pre-visualization crew. Currently Paul is a digital matte 
painter at Pixar Animation Studios. Lecture: Digital Painting, and The Narrowing Gap between 
Games and Film See page 112 

Andres Torrubia 

Andres Torrubia leads research and product development, engineering and architecture from 
Trymedia Systems' European Laboratory. The company was founded on his vision for the now- 
patented ActiveMARK'" technologies and he continues to play an important role in the develop 
ment of new ActiveMARK-based products. Andres is a frequent contributor to technical publica- 
tions, including IEEE Transactions on Multimedia, Journal of Computers and Security and EDN 
Magazine. In addition, he has given numerous lectures and speeches on the topics of security, 
content protection and software engineering. Andres holds a combined B.S. /M.S. in 
Telecommunications Engineering from the Polytechnic University of Valencia, Spain, and is cur- 
rently completing his Ph.D. in Perceptual Cryptography Sponsored Session: Inside the Hacker 
Mind See page 99. Sponsored Session: ActiveMARK Tutorial See page 92 

Quoc Trail 

Quoc Tran has been working with Alias since 2002. During this time, he has worked with Maya's 
API and MEL scripting language by supporting customers, writing Maya plug-ins and giving API 
training to customers. Sponsored Tutorial: (444) World Building in Maya See page 36 




■139- 



SPEAKER BIOS 



Doug Twilleager 

Doug Twilleager is the chief architect of the Came Technologies 
Croup at Sun. Doug is also responsible for 3D software technol- 
ogy strategies. He was one of the architects of Java 3D and also 
worked in the graphics research group at Sun, focusing on pro- 
grammable shading and advanced rendering techniques. 
During his 15 years at Sun, he has worked on many technologies 
including the X11 window system, XGL, and OpenCL Tutorial: 
(341) Web-Based 3D Gaming See page 33 

Fumito Ueda 

Fumito Ueda graduated from Osaka University of Arts and his 
major was oil painting After graduating he learned the com- 
puter graphics by himself and joined the game industry as an 
CG animator in 1995. Fumito joined Sony Computer 
Entertainment Inc. In 1997 and played a main role for develop- 
ing ICO as a director, lead game designer, and art designer. 
Lecture: Game Design Method of ICO See page 64 

Jules Urbach 

Jules Urbach is one of the earliest pioneers of game content 
and technology in the multimedia industry. He was born in 
Paris, France, in 1974. Jules began his career as a software engi- 
neer in high school developing technology that allowed for 
full screen video playback on an Intel 386. After spending two 
weeks at Harvard University, Jules left college to develop 
videogames full time Jule's first game, Hell Cab (the second 
CD-ROM game ever released), was developed for Time Warner 
Interactive when he was 18 and sold 300,000 units. Jules went 
on to develop games, engines, and authoring tools for Virgin 
GT Interactive, Electronic Arts and Bandai. Hules was the first 
individual to create a 3D game, Real Pool CD-ROM. with the 
use of Macromedia Director in 1996. Jules then applied his 
expertise to the web to create the 3D Groove technology and 
co-founded the Groove Alliance in 1998. Tutorial: (341) Web- 
Based 3DGaming See page 33 

Stefaan van Hooydonk 

Stefaan van Hooydonk spent the last five years in Finland, 
where he headed Nokia's e-learning initiatives globally, and 
brought gaming into Nokia's learning process. He has recently 
formed an independent consultancy, based in Belgium, to 
help other companies create and perfect their strategies in 
this area Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 37 

Jim Van Verth 

Jim Van Verth has been working in the game industry for over 
six years, concentrating on 3D graphics and simulation. Most 
of that time has been at Red Storm Entertainment, where he 
was lead engineer on such projects as Tom Clancy's Politika 
and Force 21. At GDC, he has been a co-author on three 
papers and has presented his Math for Programmers talk for 
the past three years. He is currently co-lead on an unan- 
nounced console/PC project, and is writing a book to be pub- 
lished by Morgan Kaufmann in 2003. Tutorial: (338) Essential 
Math for Game Programmers See page 33 

Rich Vogel 

Rich Vogel has been doing game development for 12 years. 
Rich has worked on console, PC, and online games. He was the 
producer of Meridian 59 and Ultima Online. He helped 
launch and run the service for both online games. He is cur- 
rently director of development at Sony Online Entertainment. 
He is overseeing the development of Star Wars Galaxies He 
speaks frequently on issues of online world design, online 
development process, and online community management. 
Tutorial: (335) Developing a Massively Multiplayer Game See 
page 35, Lecture: Creating the Right Mix of Static Versus 
Dynamic Content in a Massively Multiplayer Game See page 
62 

Jussi Wacklin 

Jussi Wacklin has been employed with Nokia since February, 
1999. Between February, 2003 and the present, he has held 
the position of Manager of Online Technology. Included 
among his many job duties, Jussi has been responsible for the 
creation and development of the online technology acting as 
the back-end platform for Nokia's N-Gage Game Deck 
Console, which is also known as N-Gage Arena. He has been 
heading the online technology team and participated in the 
Games Publishing Management Team within Nokia. He has 
contributed to technology evaluation, M&A activities and cor- 
porate integration planning, as well. Prior to 2003, Jussi held 
the positions of Software R&D Project Manager, Program 
Release Manager and Solution Marketing Manager. In addi- 
tion to project management, process coordination and soft- 
ware release management duties, he was responsible for mar- 



keting tasks related to mobile platforms, which involved prod- 
uct launch deployment at major global events, managing sub- 
contractors, and advertising agents, and a host of C-level cus- 
tomer visits. Jussi holds a Bachelor's Degree in Business 
Administration from Helsinki School of Economics and 
Business Administration in Helsinki, Finland Sponsored 
Session: Developing Games for N-Gage See page 97 

lAz Wakefield 

Liz Wakefield is the operations manager for the International 
Game Developers Association (IGDA).The IGDA unites the 
game development community to give the industry a com- 
mon voice. Liz helps game developers run local IGDA Chapters 
in addition to organizing the IGDA's San Francisco Bay Area 
Chapter Group Gathering: Chapter Coordinators' Group 
Gathering See page 73; Roundtable: IGDA Chapter 
Development See page j$ 

John Walker 

John Walker is a senior software engineer (SE) working on an 
unannounced multi-platform title for High Voltage Software. 
John has three years of game industry experience and more 
than loyears programming real-time graphics and simula- 
tion. Previous to HVS, John was the lead SE for two undis- 
closed projects for the DoD and a SE for Yosemite 
Entertainment (Sierra) on an unreleased space-combat simu- 
lation title (Babylon 5: Into the Fire). His initial work and 
research was in virtual / augmented reality (VR/AR), artificial 
life, and real-time simulation. Roundtable: Technical Issues in 
Tools Development See page ioj; Roundtable: Tools and Tool 
Development: Production Track See page 8j 

Jack Wall 

Jack Wall has built a prestigious career upon strong produc- 
tion values. He cut his teeth working at Synchro Sound 
Studios in Boston and Skyline Studios NYC, where he engi- 
neered and produced records for John Cale, David Byrne, Dr. 
John, and Patti Smith. With John Cale, they produced film 
soundtracks for Basquiat , Somewhere In the City, Rhinoceros 
Hunting in Budapest, and House of America. Jack also engi- 
neered and mixed John Cale's critically acclaimed album 
"Walking on Locusts," and produced a live recording of John 
Cale. He has brings exactly the right combination of tempo 
and energy to film and videogame soundtracks, most notably 
for the attention-grabbing independent film War Zone and 
the award-winning Myst III: Exile, which has become one of 
the most successful and talked about soundtracks in the 
videogame industry. Composing for and conducting a full 
symphony orchestra and master chorale for the game. Jack 
Wall is senior director and co-founder of The Game Audio 
Network Guild (G.A.N.G.). Panel: Mixing and Mastering Music 
and Sound for Games See page 45, Panel: Music Publishing: A 
Primer for Game Developers and Composers See page S4; 
Panel: Producing Orchestral Scores for Games See page 46 

Jon Walsh 

Jon Walsh is the President and founder of Groove Games, an 
independent game publisher based out of Toronto, Canada. 
Since inception, Groove has published over half a dozen 
games and currently has five projects in development for 
release this year, including the much talked about and highly 
anticipated Playboy: The Mansion game, which he wrote the 
original concept document for. At Groove Jon is responsible 
for overall company strategy and direction as well as creating 
and securing top quality game titles in conjunction with 
developer partners. Before starting Groove, Jon was the 
Canadian Sales Manager for Activision for several years. While 
at Activision he dealt with major game franchises including 
the Tony Hawk and Spider-Man series. Jon started in the 
game business in 1995 when he opened his own video game 
retail store in downtown Toronto. During his five years in 
retail, the store enjoyed great success and quickly became the 
gaming hotspot in the city and the number one independent 
game store in Canada. Jon has an Honors B.A. and M.B.A. from 
the Ivey School of Business at the University of Western 
Ontario Lecture: A Road Map for Peace: Redefining the 
Publisher- Developer Relationship See page 56 

Robert Walsh 

Robert Walsh is the CEO and founder of Krome Studios. 
Founded in 1999, Krome has become Australia's largest game 
developer, employing more than 120 people and having 
shipped 21 skus on 7 different platforms. Robert has success- 
fully negotiated contracts with many of the leading major 
publishers including THO, Disney Interactive, Vivendi 
Universal, Ubisoft, and Electronic Arts. Krome's most recent 
achievement is the launch of their original IP, "TY the 



Tasmanian Tiger," which Krome co-published with Electronic 
Arts and which has now sold more than a million units world- 
wide. Krome is currently working on the sequel toTYTHE 
Tasmanian Tiger and a game based on an unannounced 
major film franchise. Robert is a board member of the Game 
Developers Association of Australia and is on the advisory 
board for the Australian Game Developers Conference. Robert 
holds a B. Comm. from the University of Queensland and is 
also a CPA Tutorial: (357) Leveraging Development Deals to 
Build Value in Your Studio See page 36 

Bruce Walter 

Bruce Walter is a research associate at the Cornell Program of 
Computer Graphics, whose current research interest is accu- 
rate lighting simulation, interactive rendering, and finding 
ways to combine the two. He is author or co-author of a 
dozen research papers and holds a B.A. in Physics/Computer 
Science from Williams College and a PhD in Computer Science 
from Cornell University. He has also worked as the lead proj- 
ect engineer at Caligari Corp. for the truespace 1.0 and 2.0 
products, and spent a year as a post-doctoral researcher in 
Imagis Laboratory in Grenoble, France Lecture: Reusing 
Shading for Interactive Global Illumination See page 105 

Gordon Walton 

Gordon Walton has been authoring games and managing 
game development since 1977. Gordon has personally devel- 
oped over two dozen games and managed the development 
of hundreds of games. He has spoken at every Game 
Developers Conference since they began on topics ranging 
from game design to programming to business. He has had 
his own development company (twice) and has been develop- 
ment manager for Three-Sixty Pacific and Konami America, VP 
of development for GameTek, R. VPand general manager of 
Kesmai Studios, VP online services for Origin Systems manag- 
ing Ultima Online, and is current VP and executive producer 
of The Sims Online at Maxis. Lecture: Requirements for a 
Next Generation Massively Multiplayer Online Game See page 
8j\ Tutorial: (335) Developing a Massively Multiplayer Game 
See page 3s 

Niniane Wang' 

Niniane Wang is a software engineer at Google. Until last fall, 
she was a software development lead on Microsoft Flight 
Simulator, where she developed the dynamic weather system 
for Flight Simulator 2004: A Century of Flight. Prior to that, 
she worked on Flight Simulator 2002 and an internal 
Microsoft racing game. Niniane graduated from Caltech with 
a B.S. in computer science at age eighteen. She also holds a 
M.S. in computer science from the University of Washington. 
Lecture: Realistic and Fast Cloud Rendering in Computer 
Games See page 10; 

Col. Casey Wardynski 

Colonel Casey Wardynski is the Director of the U.S. Army's 
Office of Economic and Manpower Analysis and a professor at 
West Point. To reduce the career information search and 
assimilation costs associated with learning about Soldiering, 
Colonel Wardynski developed the concept for the Army Game 
Project. He serves as the Army development and operational 
manager of the project known publicly as America's Army, a 
PC game that provides inside perspective into today's Army. 
Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 31 

Damon Watson 

Damon Watson has broad experience handling legal and busi- 
ness matters in the videogame industry. Two of Damon's 
recent engagements involve the wireless distribution of 
videogames, and the development of an online interactive 
role playing game geared toward teenage boys and girls. 
Damon has been cited as an authority on legal and policy 
developments by CNN.com (violent games) and Came 
Developer magazine (massively multiplayer online games). 
Most notably, Damon played videogames dating back to 
Atari's PONG and 2600 consoles and has been a consumer 
and observer of the videogame industry ever since. Before 
joining Bryan Cave LLP, Damon specialized in high-tech and 
entertainment-intellectual property litigation at Latham & 
Watkins. He later moved to Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc., 
where he served as director of business and legal affairs. Later, 
he served as director of business and legal affairs for Frontera 
Corporation (formerly known as Homepage.com, Inc., an ideal- 
ab! company) Roundtable: Massively Excessive: Addiction or 
Irresponsibility? See page 77 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



-KO- 



www.gdconf.com 



SPEAKER BIOS 



Dave Weinstein 

Dave Weinstein, after various and sundry jobs, including learning far more about libraries than any 
non-librarian should know, entered the industry at White Wolf Productions working on Empire II: 
The Art of War. After a stint at Kesmai Studios, he joined Red Storm Entertainment, where he has 
been since 1997. His work there has included the design and development of the network libraries 
Red Storm uses on the PC, Xbox, Playstation 2, and Gameboy Advanced platforms and core tools 
and libraries for the Gameboy Advanced, in addition to work as part of the game development 
teams Roundtable: Game Credits: Towards Industry Guidelines See page 75, Roundtable: 
Multiplayer Tricks of the Trade See page 102; Roundtable: Technical Issues in Tools Development See 
page 107; Roundtable: Tools and Tool Development: Production Track See page 87 

John Welch 

John Welch, vice president of Games and Product Development at AtomShockwave Corp.. is 
responsible for acquiring, developing, and promoting interactive games and entertainment for 
the Shockwave.com brand. John is driven by the purpose of raising online gaming to greater 
mass-market appeal and commercial success. He has been with Shockwave.com since 1999 Prior 
to Shockwave.com, John spent time at Sega and with a consulting company that he co-founded. 
He holds Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Computer Science, the former from MIT and the lat- 
ter from the University of Massachusetts. Tutorial: (334) Casual Games Summit See page 34, 
Panel: The State of the Web and Downloadable Games Industry See page 57 

Mike Wellins 

Mike Wellins is a prolific Indie filmmaker and commercial director of animation. Currently he's 
working at Happy Hour Entertainment in Portland. Oregon. Prior to that, he was a staff director 
at Will Vinton Studios for five-and-a-half years. There he directed dozens of commercials for 
clients ranging from Kikkoman to PlayStation, as well as television pilots, a video for the 
"Powerpuff Girls", and an episode of Fox's "The PJs". Mike's professional and independent work 
has earned numerous awards, including an Annie for best animated commercial. His films have 
been featured in "The Sick and Twisted" and have appeared on Cartoon Network, MTV and the 
Sci-fi Channel. Mike has made over 60 films (long and short, live and animated), including two 
low budget features Sponsored Session: Storytelling and Animation: Part 1 See page T75; 
Sponsored Session: Storytelling and Animation: Part 2 See page 775 

David Wessman 

David Wessman is currently a lead game designer at Volition, Inc. in Champaign, IL. David has 
been a game designer with more than 12 years of experience creating successful combat action 
games for the PC and console. It has been his great good fortune to work with some of the best 
teams in the industry. His design credits include Blood Wake, a fast-action boat combat game 
developed by Stormfront Studios, and published by Microsoft for the Xbox, and the entire X- 
Winc /Tie Fighter series of Star Wars space combat simulator games developed by Totally 
Games and published by LucasArts. He is most proud of Tie Fighter and the recognition it has 
received as "the greatest computer game of all time." (Well, for a little while anyway.) In addition 
to working primarily on combat action titles, David is also an avid strategy gamer. He is the 
developer of Command magazine's final issue wargame,"When Dragons Fight: If China Invades 
Taiwan," and Strategy & Tactics magazine's "War of 1812 " Roundtable: Game Designers and 
Development Teams See page 64 

Thomas Westin 

Thomas Westin is programmer and interface designer of the Terraformers team at the independ- 
ent game studio Pin Interactive AB, Stockholm, Sweden. The team received the "Innovation in 
Audio Award 2003" for Terraformers at the Independent Games Festival during GDC 2003. He is 
also a teacher at the "Multimedia Education & Technology" programme at Stockholm University 
in web 3D programming, and tutor in accessibility issues. Beside videogames, Thomas' interests 
include watching movies and painting. He lives in Stockholm, Sweden Roundtable: Game 
Accessibility Implementation See page 75 

Doug Whatley 

Doug Whatley founded BreakAway in 1998 after serving as Director of Product Development at 
OT Sports, a venture of ABC Interactive and MicroProse. Among BreakAway 's titles are the soft- 
ware that supports the US Army's premier War Game; Unified Quest '03. and the latest in the 
award-winning Civilization III Series; Civilization III: Conquests. Breakaway will end 2003 with 
$5 million in revenue and count Boeing. Northrop Grumman, General Dynamics, Microsoft and 
The US Army among its customers. Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 31. Sponsored 
Session: Government Simulation in 3DS Max See page 773 

Paul Whitaker 

Paul Whitaker is the N Gage Arena manager for the Americas within Nokia's Entertainment & 
Multimedia Business Unit (EMBU). During his three years with Nokia, his roles have ranged from 
programming and project management to business development and marketing. Prior to his 
work at Nokia, Paul worked with several dot com startups. His most recent position before join- 
ing Nokia was with AnywhereYouGo.com, where he secured content for the site from partner 
sites and syndication feed services. Before joining AnywhereYouGo.com, Paul worked with People 
Design Technology, where he performed User Interface Design research and consulting services 
His key customer in this position was nokiausa.com. Paul is a native of Texas. Sponsored Session: 
Creating Local Interactive Games for N-Gage See page 96 

Guy Whitmore 

Guy Whitmore has recently joined Seattle-based developer, Escape Factory, as composer and 
audio director. Guy has composed numerous game scores since 1994, as well as writing for the- 
ater, film, and commercial media. He has garnered many accolades, including a 1996 nomination 
for Best Soundtrack from the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences. He has contributed articles 
on game audio to several publications, including Game Developer magazine and an upcoming 
book on DirectX Audio. He has spoken at past GDCs and several other panels and lectures, includ- 
ing to students at Digi-Pen, and at IMX (Interactive Music Expo). Among his peers, Guy is consid- 
ered the leading composer and innovator of adaptive game scores. Computer Games magazine 
called his score for No One Lives Forever "the best interactive music seen in an action game!" 
Panel: The State of Non-Linear Audio for Interactive Media See page 46 



Jason Wiener 

Jason Wiener is a 3D Artist and college Instructor with published credits in the print industry and 
extensive work in games as a character designer and 3D production artist. He teaches 3D model- 
ing, texturing, and animation for games and film at the Art Institute of California at San 
Francisco and is the 2003 Artist in Residence at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, where his 
work is featured in the 2004 Counter Gaming gallery show. Samples of his art can be found at 
www.madwomb.com. He looks forward to creating with you! Group Gathering: Creature Artists 
Group Gathering See page 73 

Martin Wilde 

Martin Wilde has immersed himself in the field of audio programming for more than two 
decades, and in game audio specifically for the last ten years. He has designed, developed, and 
shipped sound and music software engines for computer game titles on a multitude of plat- 
forms. Martin holds two United States patents, a Master's degree in Computer Studies in Music, 
and is the chairman of the Audio Engineering Society Technical Committee on Audio for Games. 
Martin is also an active member of the Interactive Audio Special Interest Group. He regularly 
publishes articles on game audio, and over the years has made numerous presentations to the 
AES, the Game Developers Conference, the Interactive Multimedia Association, and the 
International Computer Music Association. Martin now works at Motorola, Inc. in their PCS divi- 
sion, bringing his expertise to bear on their audio engine for mobile phones. Welcome to the 
machine Panel: Audio for Mobile Panel See page 43, Lecture: Cross-Platform Audio Using 
Interactive XMF See page 43 

Matthias Wloka 

Matthias Wloka works in the technical developer relations group at Nvidia. There, Matthias gets 
to collaborate with game-developers on, for example, performance-optimizing their game. He is 
also always tinkering with the latest graphics hardware to explore the limits of interactive real- 
time rendering. Before joining Nvidia. Matthias was a game developer himself, working for 
GameFX/THO Inc. He received his M.Sc in computer science from Brown University in 1990, and 
his B.Sc from Christian Albrechts University in Kiel, Germany in 1987 Sponsored Session: Next- 
Gen Special Effects Showcase See page 102: Tutorial: (337) Advanced Visual Effects with Direct3D 
See page 33 

Brian Wolkenberg 

Panel: Audio for Mobile Panel See page 43 

Matt Wood 

Matt Wood has been working professionally as a game developer for almost seven years. Matt 
got his start in the industry as a level designer at 3D Realms Entertainment in early 1997. He 
soon branched out to do modeling, art, animation, and game design, working on projects such as 
PREY (the 'portal technology' episode) and Max Payne. His main contributions were to the now 
infamous Duke Nukem Forever. Matt now works at Valve Software as a level designer/artist on 
multiple projects including Team Fortress 2 and Half-Life 2. Panel: State of the Art: Anatomy of 
3D Level Design See page 69 

Bruce Woodard 

Bruce Woodard has been professionally involved in the field of computer graphics since 1996, 
when he was recruited to Evans & Sutherland. While there, his work focused primarily on dedi- 
cated real-time collision systems. After a few years, Bruce succumbed to the promise of the gam- 
ing industry, and in 1998 began work at Singletrac. This transition not only afforded him a 
chance to work creatively in an R&D setting, it also allowed him to develop various core systems 
for Singletrac's initial PS2 engine. Since then, Bruce has been at Incog Inc. Entertainment, where 
he has worked on the car-combat title Twisted Metal:Black and the free-roaming character 
fighter War of the Monsters. As a software lead at Incog, Bruce is involved with the design and 
architecture of the core game engine in addition to being responsible for writing specific func- 
tionality for Al, dynamics, streaming, animation, and the general feel of the game. Lecture: 
Destruction on a Diet See page 96 

Steven Woodcock 

Steven Woodcock's background in game Al comes from some 18 years of ballistic missile defense 
work building massive real-time war-game and simulators. He maintains a web page dedicated 
to game Al at www.gameai.com.and is the author of various papers on the subject. He now 
does a variety of contract work and has contributed to and been technical editor for several 
books in the field including the Game Programming Gems and Al Game Programming Wisdom 
series. Steve lives in gorgeous Colorado Springs with his lovely wife Colleen and an indetermi- 
nate number of pet ferrets. He can be reached at ferretman@gameai.com Roundtable: Al in 
Computer Games Roundtables and Interactive Discussion See page 93 

Will Wright 

Will Wright, Maxis' chief designer, co-founded Maxis with Jeff Braun in 1987. Will began working 
on what would become SimCity-The City Simulator in 1985. Using a complex technique, he 
found a way to bring realistic simulations to desktop PCs. Previously simulations of this sort 
were only available to the military, scientists, and academicians. But now, using an easy-to-use 
graphic interface, the world of simulations opened up to consumers. Wright has had a lifelong 
fascination with simulations. His interest in plastic models of ships and airplanes during his 
childhood in Georgia eventually led to his designing computer models of cities, ecosystems, and 
ant colonies. SimCity was released in 1989, and within a few months became a hit. With Fred 
Haslem.Will co-designed SimEarth-The Living Planet in 1990, a simulation of a planet based on 
the Gaia theory of James Lovelock. In 1991, Will and Justin McCormick designed SimAnt-The 
Electronic Ant Colony, a scientifically-accurate simulation of an ant colony. SimCity 2000 and 
SiMCoPTER.a helicopter flight game, are Will's most recent releases Panel: Towards Relevant 
Research: Collaboration 101 See page 79, Lecture: Triangulation: A Schizophrenic Approach to 
Game Design See page 70; Panel: Game Design Challenge: The Love Story See page 64 

David Wu 

David Wu is on a mission to prove to the world the truth of his long-held hypothesis: In 
humankind's endless pursuit of happiness, good physics is just as vital as good coffee. While not 



■1*1- 



SPEAKER BIOS 



programming, David Wu is the president and director of tech- 
nology at Pseudo Interactive. There are other facets to David's 
life and if provoked he will talk about himself for hours on 
end. None of this is relevant, compelling, or worthy of print. 
Roundtable: Taking Game Physics Beyond Eye Candy See page 
107 

Bernie Yee 

Tutorial: Tutorial (353) Game Tuning Workshop See page 31 

Hector Yee 

Hector Yee is a Rendering Specialist at PDI/Dream Works. 
Hector is working on the Tenderer that is being used to create 
Shrek 2. Before joining the movie industry, he was at 
Westwood Studios where he was a graphics programmer. He 
has given talks at Siggraph and CDC on topics such as global 
illumination and high-dynamic range tone mapping algo- 
rithms. He has a Master of Science in Computer Graphics from 
Cornell University Lecture: Procedural Shaders: A Feature 
Animation Perspective See page 104 

Neil Young 

See page 59 for bio Keynote: Entertainment Experience First, 
Videogame Second: The Making of The Return of the King 
See page S9 

Peter Young 

Peter Young works as a developer support engineer for Sony 
Computer Entertainment America. There he consults developers 
on topics such as 3D graphics techniques and performance 
analysis/tuning. Peter got his start in the game industry work- 
ing on small online PC titles. He then went on to ship a number 
of games for the highly successful Playstation console. Having 
realized his threshold for crunch time and pepperoni pizza, 
Peter decided to focus exclusively on 3D graphics; first with a 
position at 3dfx Interactive, and then finally finding his home at 
SCEA where he has spent the last three years Lecture: 
Programming the Playstation Portable (PSP) See page 104 

Greg Zeschuk 

Greg Zeschuk is Joint CEO and one of the founding partners of 
BioWare Corp., the developer responsible for creating 
Shattered Steel, Baldur's Gate, Baldur's Gate: Tales of the 
Sword Coast, Baldur's Gate 2. Shadows of Amn, Baldur's 
Gate 2:Throne of Bhaal, MDK2, MDK2: Armageddon, 
Neverwinter Nights, Neverwinter Nights: Shadows of 
Undrentide, Neverwinter Nights: Hordes of the 
Underdark, and Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic As 
Co-Executive Producers of all projects at BioWare. Greg and 
his partner Ray Muzyka (also Joint CEO of BioWare), oversee 
and manage the development of BioWare 's games. Greg is a 
board member of the International Game Developers 
Association and also serves as a Director and Co-Chairman of 
CodeBaby Corp., another software company developing a next 
generation interface for digital media and the Internet. 
Lecture: Managing the Hydra: Successfully Running Multiple 
Projects in a Videogame Studio See page 85 

Gabe Zicherman 

Gabe Zichermann directs Trymedia's worldwide strategic rela- 
tions, product marketing, and marketing communications 
activities. His contributions to the digital distribution industry 
include such milestones as posting the first song for which an 
artist could collect revenue on the original Napster, posting 
the first legitimate downloadable games to peer-to-peer net- 
works and completing extensive consumer research on game 
download habits and trends. Prior to joining Trymedia, Gabe 
held positions in the e-commerce field with companies such 
as Cisco Systems, Bay Networks/Nortel, and Checkpoint 
Software. He was also director of marketing for the Game and 
Web divisions of CMP Media. Gabe is a frequent speaker and 
media resource on topics related to the digital distribution of 
entertainment content He holds a Bachelor's degree in 
Science from Canada's University of Waterloo, and an M.B.A. 
from Rollins College in Florida. Sponsored Session: Feel Good 
Game Security See page si 

Eric Zimmerman 

Eric Zimmerman has worked in the game industry for more 
than 10 years. Eric is co-founder and CEO of gamelab, a New 
York-based online game developer (www.gmlb.com) game- 
lab's award-winning titles inlcude Blix, Loop, and Lego 
Junkbot. Some of Eric's pre-gamelab titles include the critical- 
ly acclaimed Sissyfight 2000 (www.sissyfight.com, created 
with Word.com) and the PC game Gearheads. Eric has taught 
game design and interactive narrative design at MIT's 
Comparative Media Studies program, New York University's 



Interactive Telecommunications Program, and the Digital 
Design M.F.A. program at Parsons School of Design and has 
lectured and published extensively about game design and 
digital culture. Eric has recently published two books on game 
design, Rules of Play (co-authored with Katie Salen) and 
RC:PLAY (co-edited with Amy Scholder). Tutorial: (332) 
Multiplayer Trade: Designing Social Interaction in Games See 
page 34, Tutorial: (351) Developer Business Summit: An IGDA 
Think-Tank See page 31, Panel: Game Design Challenge: The 
Love Story See page 64, Roundtable: The Education of a Game 
Developer See page 74 

Victor Zordan 

Victor Zordan is an assistant professor of computer science 
and engineering at the University of California Riverside. He 
received his Ph.D. in computer science from Georgia Institute 
of Technology in 2002 under the advisement of Dr. Jessica 
Hodgins. Professor Zordan's research interests fall in computer 
animation, human body simulation, physically based model- 
ing, interactive virtual environments, human behavior, and 
interface design. He has published numerous papers on 
physics-based animation, the control of dynamically simulat- 
ed human characters and the use of motion capture data for 
computer animation and control. Lecture: Motion Capture- 
driven Simulation for Characters See page 101 

Michael Zyda 

Michael Zyda is the Director of The MOVES Institute, located 
at the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California. He is 
also a Professor in the Department of Computer Science at 
NPS. Professor Zyda's research interests include computer 
graphics, large-scale, networked 3D virtual environments, 
agent-based simulation, modeling human and organizational 
behavior, interactive computer-generated story, and modeling 
and simulation. He leads the creative team of the America's 
Army PC game. Tutorial: Serious Games Summit See page 31 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



-U2- www.gdconf.com 



EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



A K Peters 

63 South Avenue 

Natick, MA 01760 

Phone:508-655-9933 

Fax: 508-655-5847 

www.akpeters.com 

Booth 1706 

A K Peters publishes the journal of graphics tools and books for game 

developers. New for 2004: Interactive Storytelling: Techniques/or 21st 

Century Fiction, Alfor Computer Games, Advanced Interactive Character 

Animation, and C# and Game Programming-. A Beginner's Guide. Contact 

us to discuss new book and journal ideas, www.akpeters.com. 

Absolute Quality, Inc. 

10720 Gilroy Road 

Hunt Valley, MD 21031 

Phone:410-568-2334 

Fax:410-891-0231 

www.absolutequality.com 

Booth 1248 

Absolute Quality, Inc. is the world's largest provider of computer 

software testing services and technical support outsourcing solutions 

for software developers. Our multi-million dollar state-of-the-art testing 

and technical support facilities enable us to provide you with one 

solution for your software development and technical support 

requirements. 

Academy of Art College 

79 New Montgomery Street 

San Francisco, CA 94105 

Phone: 800-544-ARTS 

Fax:415-263-4130 

www.academyart.edu 

Booth 426 

Established in 1929, Academy of Art College offers accredited degrees 

online and on campus. Classes are taught by industry professionals and 

our state-of-the-art facilities are second to none. High professional 

standards result in a job placement rate of 85% with companies such as 

Pixar and LucasFilm. Classes include: Game Design, 3D Modeling, 

Animation, Visual Effects, Digital Imaging and more. 

Activision 

3100 Ocean Park Boulevard 

Santa Monica, CA 90405 

Phone: 310-255-2751 

Fax: 310-255-2166 

www.activision.com 

Booth CP 2030 

Headquartered in Santa Monica, California, Activision, Inc. is a leading 

worldwide developer, publisher and distributor of interactive 

entertainment and leisure products. Activision maintains operations in 

the U.S., Canada, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Japan, Australia, 

Scandinavia and the Netherlands. 

Alias Systems, a Division of Silicon Graphics 

210 King Street East 

Toronto, Ontario 

M5A1J7 

Canada 

Phone:416-362-9181 

Fax:416-362-9181 

www.alias.com 



KEY 






CP = 


Career Pavilion 








ES = 


Expo Suite 








MP 


= Mobile Pavilion 








MR 


= Meeting Room 






NTP 


= New Technologies 


Pavil 


on 



Booth ES136 

As the world's leading innovator of 3D graphics technology, Alias 
develops award-winning software, custom development and training 
solutions for the games, film and video, web, interactive media, 
industrial design, education and visualization markets. 

Alias' Maya makes the foremost 3D content creation tools accessible to a 
broad range of computer graphics professionals in the game 
development, film, broadcast, industrial design, visualization, and web 
design industries. It is an industry leading full 3D production solution. 
Maya Complete is available for just $1,999. 

Alliance Numeriqc 

Mediasphere Bell, 335 

Maisonneuve Boulevard West, #300 

Montreal, QC H2X iKi 

Canada 

Phone: 514-848-7177 

Fax: 514-848-7133 

www.numeriqc.ca 

Booth 1446 

Alliance numeriOC - Quebec's Digital Industry Network is a trade 

association including game companies. It is a privileged gateway for 

establishing partnerships with Quebec companies involved in digital 

content and multimedia. Participants include: Quazal -Announcing 

Rendez-Vous, a powerful, flexible solution for online game lobby 

development. Rendez-Vous perfectly complements their 

Net-Z and Eterna networking cores. Enzyme Labs - a leading provider of 

QA solutions for all major game platforms. Providing gameplay, 

functionality and compatibility testing, localization and more. 

AMD 

One AMD Place 

Sunnyvale, CA 94088-3453 

Phone: 408-749-4000 

www.amd.com 

Booth 1108 & MR 4408 

Founded in 1969, AMD is a Standard & Poor's 500 company with global 

operations and manufacturing facilities in the United States, Europe, 

Japan and Asia. For more information about AMD, please visit 

www.amd.com or stop by the AMD booth #1108. 

AMD (NYSE:AMD) designs and produces microprocessors, Flash memory 
devices and system-on-chip solutions for the computer, communications 
and consumer electronics industries. AMD is dedicated to helping its 
customers deliver standards-based, customer-focused solutions for 
technology users, ranging from enterprises to government agencies and 
individual consumers. Visit AMD in booth #1108. 

Animation Magazine 

30941 W. Agoura Road, Suite 102 
Westlake Village, CA 91361 
Phone: 818-991-2884 
Fax: 818-991-3773 
www.animationmagazine.net 
Booth 1702 




EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



-U3- 



Animation Magazine reports on all aspects of 
animation and is the most comprehensive 
source about technology, film, television, 
gaming, commercials, events and trends. Our 
subscribers include animators, producers, 
directors, executives, broadcasters, 
distributors, publishers, recruiters, teachers 
and students. In addition, we also provide 
subscribers with daily news emailed directly 
to them. 

Anthro Corp 

10450 S.W. Manhasset Drive 

Tualatin, OR 97062 

Phone:800-325-3841 

Fax:800-325-0045 

www.anthro.com 

Booth 1541 

Strong, mobile furniture for game developer 

applications. Our expanded family of products 

include the fit system, AnthroBench, and 

AnthroCart lines. Find style and function for 

every application. Each line provides shapes 

and sizes that are adjustable for optimum 

ergonomic solutions. Lifetime Warranty. Visit 

our website at www.anthro.com. 

AOL Games 

333 Bush Street, 23rd floor 

San Francisco, CA 94104 

Phone: 415-844-9000 

Fax:415-844-9060 

AOL Keyword: Video Games 

MR 4407 

AOL Games offers the ultimate destination for 

gamers - reaching everyone from those who 

play casual online games to the avid gamer 

interested in PC and console gaming. 

Featuring original entertainment 

programming, exclusive demos of the hottest 

video games, cheats and tips, competitive 

gaming options and more, AOL boosts more 

than 10 million unique visitors monthly. 

The Art Institute of California - 
San Francisco 

1170 Market Street 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

Phone:415-865-0198 

Fax:415-863-6344 

www.aicasf.aii.edu 

Booth 1043 

The Art Institute of California - San Francisco 

offers degree programs in Game Art & Design, 

Media Arts & Animation, Visual & Game 

Programming and other fields. It is one of The 

Art Institutes, a system of 30 schools providing 

an important source of design, media arts, 

fashion and culinary professionals. 



Associated Production Music (APM) 

6255 Sunset Boulevard, Suite 280 

Hollywood, CA 90028 

Phone:323-461-3211 

Fax:323-461-9102 

www.apmmusic.com 

Booth 645 

APM, the largest provider of production music 

for game companies, is featured in many of 

the best-selling games of all time, as well as in 

promotional trailers for demos, Internet, and 

E3. We have over 175,000 tracks featuring 

every musical genre, from powerful orchestral 

suites to the latest hard-hitting styles. 

Association of Shareware Professionals 

313 South Harmony Drive 
Janesville, Wl 53545 
Phone: 877-479-4493 
Fax:765-349-4744 
www.asp-shareware.org 
Booth NTP 656-2 

The ASP is a not-for-profit association of over 
1,300 independent software developers, 
marketers and vendors, most of whom use the 
try-before-you-buy method of software distri- 
bution. For more information on the ASP, visit 
our consumer information web site at 
www.asp-shareware.com. 

Atari 

417 Fifth Avenue 
New York, NY 10016 
Phone: 212-726-6500 
Fax: 212-726-3424 
www.atari.com 
Booth CP 1838 

Atari, Inc. develops interactive games for all 
platforms and is one of the largest third-party 
publishers of interactive entertainment 
software in the U.S.. Atari, Inc. is a majority- 
owned subsidiary of France-based Infogrames 
Entertainment SA, the largest interactive 
games publisher in Europe. 

ATI Technologies, Inc. 

1 Commerce Valley Drive East 

Markham, ON L3T7N6 

Canada 

Phone: 905-882-2600 

Fax: 905-882-2620 

www.ati.com 

Booth 827 & MR 4406 

ATI Technologies is a world leader in the 

design and manufacture of innovative visual 

processor solutions. A pioneer and market 

leader in the graphics industry, ATI provides 

cutting-edge visual processor technologies for 

the PC, Macintosh, workstation and notebook 

markets plus consumer markets including 

hand-held, set-top box and digital TVs. 



©Last Software, Inc. / SketchUp 

821 Pearl Street 
Boulder, CO 80302 
Phone: 303-245-0086 
Fax: 303-245-8562 
www.sketchup.com 
Booth 443 

SketchUp is a new way to design in 3D on the 
computer. SketchUp's unique user interface 
allows quick and easy 3D form creation, 
viewing and modification. Designs conceptu- 
alized in SketchUp can be imported into most 
3D modeling, image editing and illustration 
applications, including 3ds max and Maya. 
SketchUp is available for Windows and 
Macintosh OS X. 

Backbone Entertainment 

5515 Doyle Street, Suite 1 
Emeryville, CA 94608 
Phone: 510-547-6101 
www.backboneentertainment.com 
Booth CP 2029 

Backbone Entertainment was formed from the 
merger of Digital Eclipse and ImaginEngine 
(both of which continue to exist as brands). Its 
more than 100 employees develop cutting 
edge games and interactive entertainment for 
nearly every platform imaginable, including 
cell phones, GBA, PSP, PS2, and Xbox. 

Big- World 

Canberra Technology Park 

Phillip Avenue 

Watson, ACT 2602 

Australia 

Phone: +61-2-6162 5120 

Fax: +61-2-6242-5090 

www.bigworldtech.com 

Booth 1530 

BigWorld Pty. Ltd. was established by Micro 

Forte to drive the further development of the 

award winning BigWorld™ Technology. The 

role of the company has since expanded to 

encompass the marketing of the technology, 

including licensing, licensee support and 

training. 

BigWorld Technology is the world's most 
advanced Massively Multiplayer Online Games 
(MMOG) middleware. It provides developers 
with a tightly integrated set of applications 
designed specifically for the creation of 
MMOGs. BigWorldTM Technology includes the 
server infrastructure, the client front end and 
content development tools. 

Bionatics 

12 Avenue Raspail 

Gentilly 94250 

France 

Phone: +33 1 49 69 12 20 



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EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



Fax: +33 i 49 69 12 29 
Booth 1710 

Bionatics develops the leading technology for 3D plant modeling and 
animation. The company offers innovative solutions for the video game 
industry in order to improve production time and quality of 3D outdoor 
environments. Bionatics works with major references such as UbiSoft, 
Electronic Arts, VUGames, LucasArts, lonStorm, Microsoft, Atari, Namco, 
and RockStar. 

Bionatics will perform its innovation award-wining natFX(TM) v2.o for 
Maya for plant animation and its popular natFX(TM) vi.8 for 3ds max 
offering fast polygonal optimization and automatic LODs generation. 
Bionatics will demonstrate new levels of video game landscape quality 
including 3D volumetric trees displayed in real-time with high 
resolution. 

Bitboys Oy 

Rauhalammintie 1 

Noormarkku, 29600 

Finland 

Phone: +358-40-8231671 

Fax:+358-2-5220401 

www.bitboys.com 

Booth 431 

Expanding the visual experience on mobile devices, Bitboys Oy develops 

graphics processor cores for accelerating 2D and 3D graphics content on 

all wireless and handheld devices. The products enable high-quality 

visual user interfaces, interactive applications and next-generation 

gaming on these devices. 

Acceleon is a family of graphics processors, targeted for graphics visuali- 
zation in mobile and embedded devices. 

Blizzard Entertainment 

www.blizzard.com 
Booth CP 2034 

Best known for popular hits including the Warcraft series, StarCraft®, 
and the Diablo® series, Blizzard Entertainment, a studio of Vivendi 
Universal Games, is a premier developer and publisher of entertainment 
software renowned for creating many of the industry's most critically 
acclaimed games. Blizzard's track record includes seven #i-selling games 
and multiple Game of the Year awards. The company's free Internet 
gaming service Battle.net® is the largest in the world, with millions of 
active users. 

Butterfly.net, Inc. 

224 W. King Street 

Martinsburg, WV 25401 

Phone:304-260-9520 

Fax:304-260-9529 

licensing: john.meeker@butterfly.net 

resumes: jobs@butterfly.net 

www.butterfly.net 

ES141 

Butterfly.net is transforming the very fabric of the Internet into a high 

performance video game machine to serve the next generation of 

massively-multiplayer online gamers. They'll demand fast action, 

engrossing challenges, brilliant opponents, faithful companions and 

immense, spectacular worlds. Butterfly.net has their platform. Do you 

have their game? 

At GDC, Butterfly.net is releasing the Butterfly Grid 1.7. With a robust 
developer toolkit, stable and efficient core technology and new adminis- 
tration utilities compliant with the Open Grid Services Architecture. 



Thanks to a partnership with UC Irvine and the San Diego 
Supercomputer Center, qualified developers can build for free! 

Cartoon Network 

1065 Williams Street 

Atlanta, GA 30309 

Phone:404-827-1700 

www.CartoonNetwork.com 

MR 4407 

With more than 7 million unique users per month, CartoonNetwork.com 

is one of the top kids sites, and consistently one of the most visited 

entertainment sites among all groups on the Web. 

Cartoon Network. corn's POWER PLAY GAMES invites fans to experience 

the next level in online games. Now players can purchase downloadable 

games powered-up with features like full-screen graphics, hi-score 

tracking, bonus levels and exclusive characters. 

Charles River Media 

10 Downer Avenue 

Hingham.MA 02043 

Phone: 781-740-0400 

Fax:781-740-8816 

www.charlesriver.com 

Booth 641 

Charles River Media, the leading game development publisher, is pleased 

to unveil Came Programming Gems 4, the all new volume, the Journal of 

Came Development, Came Programming Golden Rules, and a number of 

other cutting-edge releases. Be sure to visit Booth 641 for 30% off and 

free shipping on titles. 

Charles River Media is pleased to offer many new books, including Game 
Programming Gems 4, Al Game Programming Wisdom 2, Game 
Programming Golden Rules, Mathematics for 3D Game Programming and 
Computer Graphics 2E, Came Programming with Python, Macromedia 
Flash MX 2004 Game Development, and many more. 

Climax Group Inc 

210 Main Street 

Venice, CA 90291 

Phone: 310-664-5800 

Fax: 310-664-5801 

www.climaxgroup.com 

Booth CP 1822 

Climax Group Inc set up an LA studio last year and is looking for 

talented people to join the company. Climax is currently working on 

many exciting projects with high profile publishers including Microsoft, 

SCEA, VUG, Take 2 and Disney. To find out more about the current 

vacancies come and meet us at booth #1822. 

The Collective, Inc. 

1900 Quail Street 

Newport Beach, CA 92660 

Phone: 949-255-1900 X128 

Fax:949-724-9667 

www.collectivestudios.com 

Booth CP 1829 

The Collective is a leading developer of entertainment software and 

technology. The Collective has created groundbreaking games, including 

Wrath Unleashed™, Indiana Jones and the Emperor's Tomb™ and 

Buffythe Vampire Slayer™, and has developed world-class content 

creation tools and technology. Founded in 1997, The Collective is based in 

Newport Beach, California. 




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EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



Collins College 

1140 S. Priest Drive 
Tempe, AZ 58287 
Phone:480-446-1241 
Fax:480-829-0183 
www.collinscollege.edu 
Booth 1047 

Collins College provides students with career- 
focused education in game design, animation, 
interior design, visual communication, media 
arts, graphic design and network technology. 
We achieve this through a student-centered 
learning experience that is both interactive 
and industry-driven. Our curriculum can 
prepare students for success in their chosen 
fields. 

Compulsive Creative 

28720 Canwood Street 
Agoura Hills, CA 91301 
Phone: 800-320-9940 
Fax:818-575-9893 
www.compulsivecreative.com 
Booth 948 

The Compulsive Creative is a fabulous online 
store catering to artists, filmmakers, photog- 
raphers, writers, screenwriters, playwrights, 
game developers, musicians, 3D modelers, and 
animators. We specialize in selling-at 
competitive prices-the software, hardware, 
books, and other tools creative people rely on. 

We carry a full range of professional software 
for content creation, video production, and 
game development. We sell the best graphics 
cards and high-tech peripherals you can buy, 
and fine books on subjects from games to 
programming to writing. 

Computer Graphics World 

98 Spit Brook Road 
Nashua, NH 03062 
Phone:603-891-0123 
Fax:603-891-9290 
www.cgw.com 
Booth 1704 

Computer Graphics World provides digital 
content creators essential information on the 
production tools and applications necessary to 
make them successful. The award-winning 
editorial covers the convergence of technology 
and what it means to film, TV, gaming, graphic 
arts and the web. Each month, Computer 
Graphics World presents product news, user 
stories, industry analysis, in-depth features 
and hands-on reviews. Combined with a bi- 
monthly e-newsletter and a website with 
news exclusives, you have an information-rich 
media platform serving you 24/7. Visit 
www.cgw.com for free subscriptions. 



Creative Labs, Inc./Sensaura 

1901 McCarthy Boulevard 

Milpitas, CA 95035 

Phone: 408-546-6000 

Fax:408-432-6717 

www.creative.com 

ES238 

Creative is the leader in game audio 

technology, offering game developers a 

comprehensive audio authoring solution 

including studio-quality audio capturing with 

E-mu's line of professional cards, sophisticated 

environmental audio composition tools and 

Sensaura's GameCODA API for cross-platform 

rendering across major game consoles and the 

PC. 

ISACT (Interactive Spatial Audio Composition 
Technology) - easily create and control real- 
time multi-channel interactive audio. 

EAX 4.0 - render multiple environments and 
effects in PC games. 

GameCODA - powerful cross platform audio 
development system. 

E-mu Professional soundcards - premium 
quality for all audio authoring tasks. 

CRI Middleware Company, Ltd. 

650 Townsend Street, Suite 650 
San Francisco, CA 94103 
Phone:415-701-3683 
Fax:415-701-6014 
www.cri-mw.com 
Booth 1143 & M R 44° 1 
As Sega's middleware standard, CRI 
Middleware produces serious, high- 
performance video and audio libraries for 
serious game developers. Over 800 titles from 
dozens of publishers worldwide rely on CRI for 
high-quality cinematics and audio on PS2, 
XBox, GAMECUBE, and PC platforms. Games 
using CRI technology frequently make US top- 
ten sales. 

Sofdec is CRI Middleware's cross-platform 
movie system, designed and optimized 
specially for game developers. Unlike other 
movie libraries, Sofdec supports complex real- 
time effects such as movie-in-texture and 
alpha movies. ADX is CRI's cross-platform 
audio engine, designed for highly efficient 
compression, spatialization, and playback of 
huge numbers of audio samples. 

Criterion Software Limited 

103 East 5th Street, Suite 100 
Austin, TX 78701 
Phone: 512-478-5605 
Fax: 512-478-7710 
www.renderware.com 
Booth 616 



RenderWare is widely recognized as the de- 
facto portfolio of tools and technology 
solutions for the games development industry. 
It currently comprises RenderWare Platform 
(Graphics, Physics, Audio, Al), and RenderWare 
Studio. 

RenderWare's mission is to help solve the 
complex technical issues facing the games 
development industry and through doing so, 
enable developers/publishers to efficiently 
deliver higher quality, more creative games 
and to maximize commercial opportunities on 
a long term basis with less development risk. 

Datascope Recruitment Ltd. 

109/110 Bolsover Street 
London, W1W5NT 
United Kingdom 
Phone: +44-207-580-6018 
Fax: +44-207-580-6068 
www.datascope.co.uk 
Booth CP 1925 

Established in 1991, Datascope Recruitment 
has built up an excellent reputation with its 
clients and candidates. Regarded as market 
leader in the games recruitment industry, 
Datascope prides itself on its professional and 
personal way of working. Our consultants are 
experienced in all aspects of games 
recruitment, ranging from Sales and 
Marketing to Programmers, Developers and 
Artists. Datascope has won, for the second 
year running, the management contract for all 
development recruitment needs of Sony 
Computer Entertainment Europe. Our vision 
has kept us ahead of our competitors, so if you 
want to stay ahead too, talk to us. 

demonWare 

69 Middle Abbet Street 

Dublin 

Ireland 

Phone: 353 (o) 1 873 3682 

www.demonware.net 

ES133 

demonWare provides realtime network 

solutions to the electronic entertainment 

industry. demonWare netcode keeps studios at 

the forefront of multiplayer gaming while 

offering full flexibility to developers. Call in if 

you've netcode requirements for your console 

or PC game. 

BitDemon is a fully-featured set of network 
components designed for realtime multiplayer 
games on console and PC platforms. 
BitDemon manages state synchronization 
with minimal overhead making it suitable for 
even the most resource-limited environment. 
Licensees get full flexibility, full documen- 
tation and full source. 



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EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 




DigiPen Institute of Technology 

Sooi-isoth Avenue N.E. 

Redmond, WA 98052 

Phone:425-558-0299 

Fax:425-558-0378 

www.digipen.edu 

Booth 1148 

DigiPen Institute of Technology, located in Redmond, Washington, is the 

first school dedicated to preparing computer animation and 

programming students for careers in the computer and video game 

industries. DigiPen offers both accredited undergraduate and graduate 

degree programs and summer workshops. Be sure to visit our booth 

#1148 at the CDC. 

DigiPen offers the following two and four-year degree programs: 
Bachelor of Science in Real-Time Interactive Simulation, Associate of 
Science in Real-Time Interactive Simulation, Associate of Applied Arts in 
3D Computer Animation, Bachelor of Fine Arts in Production Animation, 
Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering, and Master of Science in 
Computer Science. 

Digital Artist Management 

898 North Sepulveda Boulevard, Suite 175 

El Segundo, CA 90245 

Phone: 310-414-6800 

Fax: 310-414-6804 

www.digitalartistmanagement.com 

Booth CP 1929 

Digital Artist Management, Inc. is a leading recruiting firm for the 

interactive entertainment software industry. We specialize in the 

placement of programmers, artists and animators, designers, producers, 

and executives at all levels, with top videogames, graphics and web 

content developers. 

Digital Gaming Academy 

7703 Densmore Avenue 

Van Nuys, CA 91406 

Phone: 866-487-7600 

Fax: 818-785-9081 

www.digitalgaming.com 

Booth 1722 

The Academy of Digital Animation Came Art Program at Cerro Coso 

Community College is a Certificate and/or Associate Degree in Science 

that is fully accredited and approved by the State of California. Designed 

and delivered since 1999 by working professionals to train digital 

animators for entry level employment in the interactive game design 

industry, this degree and career training program is delivered entirely 

online and all courses in the program are transferable at the university 

level. 

Discreet 

10 Duke Street 

Montreal, OC 

H3C2L7 

Canada 

Phone: 514-393-1616 

Fax: 514-393-0110 

www.discreet.com 

ES216 

Discreet works hard at play. Discreet remains the premier source for 

game development. Already used as a primary 3D application for 80 

percent of the top-selling game titles, 3ds max® software, along with 



character studio™ and gmax® were core 3D applications used by 2003's 
top 10 developers. Presence at GDC 2004 includes a 3-day session room 
(#C3) that will cover a range of topics such as advanced game 
development solutions, mobile gaming, asset management and much 
more. Specific sessions and times are located in the CDC show guide. 

Dolby Labs Licensing Corporation 

ioo Potrero Street 

San Francisco, CA 94103 

Phone:415-558-0200 

Fax:415-863-1373 

www.dolby.com 

Booth 928 

Dolby Laboratories is showcasing new tools and technology for 

surround sound in games, including 7.1-channel Dolby Pro Logic llx 

decoding, new versions of Surcodefor Dolby Pro Logic II encoding, and a 

new online resource for professionals. Also featured is Dolby Headphone 

technology, which renders 5.1-channel audio in headphones. 

DTS 

5171 Clareton Drive 

Agoura Hills, CA 91301-4523 

Phone: 818-706-3525 

Fax:818-706-1868 

www.dtsonline.com 

Booth 1324 

DTS is an innovator in the development of multi-channel digital sound 

solutions for the consumer electronics and professional audio markets, 

including home A/V, video games and consoles, broadcast, personal 

computers and mobile and portable audio systems. Today, every major 

consumer electronics manufacturer supports DTS technology. 

Addressing the demand for DTS-encoded content worldwide, DTS also 

offers hardware and software encoders to the professional audio 

communities, allowing them to produce DTS audio content directly. 

Only DTS allows PlayStation®2 players to experience real-time 

interactive discrete digital surround sound during actual gameplay. The 

DTS software developers kit (SDK) is easy to implement and the license 

includes technical and marketing support. 

Epic Games 

5511 Capital Center Drive, Suite 675 

Raleigh, NC 27606 

Phone: 919-854-0070 

Fax: 919-854-0055 

www.epicgames.com 

ES228 

Epic Games will use its Expo Suite for demonstrations of the latest 

version of its Unreal Engine technology. Rainbow Six: Raven's Shield, 

Unreal Championship, Harry Potter andthe Chamber of Secrets and 

Splinter Cell are just a few of the recent examples of games created 

using the Unreal Engine. 

Fathammer 

Tammasaarenkatu 7 A 

Helsinki, FIN-00180 

Finland 

Phone: +358 408-778-4631 

Fax: +358 408-779-3642 

www.fathammer.com 

MP 1330-6 

Fathammer is the leading provider of advanced game technologies for 

mobile platforms. Fathammer provides its industry leading X-Forge® 








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EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



Game Development Kit and Developer 
Program Services to game developers, mobile 
device manufacturers and wireless operators. 
X-Forge Powered games bring console quality 
3D gaming to a wide range of mobile devices. 

The X-Forge® Game Development Kit is a 
complete C++ multi-platform game engine for 
developing advanced 3D games for mobile 
platforms. The solution includes binary 
libraries optimized for all major mobile 
technologies, high level game engine source 
libraries, tools for artists and packaging, 
extensive documentation and world class 
support services. 

Firelight Technologies 

Level 3 IBM Tower, 60 City Road 

Southbank, Victoria, 3006 

Australia 

Phone: +61 419 281267 

Fax: +61 3 96822001 

www.fmod.org 

Booth 1442 

Firelight Technologies is a technology 

company based in Melbourne, Australia, with 

the sole aim of helping companies produce 

the best audio they can in minimal time. They 

produce the FMOD audio library, a widely used 

and acclaimed middleware programmers tool. 

FMOD SoundSystem is a mature, feature 
packed audio middleware library that is truly 
cross platform. It handles all aspects of game 
audio, from multi-channel streaming to bank 
management, synchronization, DSP effects, 3d 
sound and multiple audio format support. 
Supports Win32, xbox, ps2, gamecube, 
macintosh, pocketpc and linux. 

411 Publishing 

5700 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 120 

Los Angeles, CA 90036 

Phone:800-535-0145 

Fax:323-965-2052 

www.games411.com 

Booth 1548 

For 25 years, 411 Publishing has set the 

standard for business-to-business directories 

serving the entertainment production 

industry. Owned by Reed Business 

Information, parent company of Variety, 411 

Publishing continues its tradition of 

publishing high quality information resources 

for the film community and now brings this 

expertise to the games industry. 

For professionals established in the games 
industry, or for people eager to enter it, Games 
411 is their one-stop resource directory. 
Produced in partnership with The Academy of 
Interactive Sciences, Games 411 is the only 
comprehensive directory for the games 
industry. 



Full Sail Real World Education 

3300 University Boulevard 
Winter Park, FL 32792 
Phone: 407-679-0100 
Fax:407-552-0273 
www.fullsail.com 
Booth 1718 

Full Sail Real World Education offers degree 
programs in Game Design and Development, 
Computer Animation and Digital Media. Full 
Sail students are taught by industry profes- 
sionals who bring their real world experiences 
into the classroom. Additional degree programs 
are offered in Audio, Film and Show Production. 

Future Games 

150 North Hill Drive 

Brisbane, CA 94005 

Phone:415-468-4684 

Fax:415-468-4686 

www.futurenetworkusa.com 

Booth 1547 

The Future Games network, an alliance of the 

best international magazine publishers, 

delivers 6i editions of Future's video games 

titles across 15 territories worldwide. In the US, 

Future Games' well-loved and market-leading 

titles include PC Gamer, PSA/1.- 700% 

Independent PlayStation 2 Magazine and 

Official Xbox Magazine and deliver a combined 

monthly rate base of 1.1 million passionate 

gamers. 

Launched in May 1994, PC Gamer proudly 
celebrates its 10th Anniversary this year, 
continuing to earn its position as the world's 
best-selling PC games magazine. Smart, 
irreverent, and well-connected, PC Gamer not 
only keeps readers "in the know", but also 
invites computer users into the rich and 
entertaining world of PC games. 

GameBeat Studios, LLC 

129 Treehouse Road, Suite #23 

Matteson, I L 60443 

Phone:708-283-8860 

Fax:708-283-8870 

www.gamebeatstudios.com 

Booth 1343 

GameBeat Studios is a leading provider of 

original music and sound effects for the game 

industry. Founded in 1998 by music industry 

veteran songwriter/producer Darryl Duncan, in 

5 years GameBeat has amassed an impressive 

"A" list of clients and worked on some of the 

best selling titles in recent years. 

GameBeat's strongest asset is it's uniquely 
creative versatility and superior level of 
customer service. Their highly experienced 
team of sound designers & composers allows 
them to create any style of music or SFX 



environment a client requires. Their services 
also include dialog recording/editing as well 
as complete project consultation. 

Gamejobs 

64 Danbury Road 
Wilton, CT 06897 
Phone: 203-761-6182 
Fax: 203-761-6184 
www.gamejobs.com 
Booth CP 1841 

GameJobs.com, the leading employment site 
serving the interactive entertainment 
industry, helps connect game business profes- 
sionals with new career opportunities, and HR 
managers with a comprehensive solution for 
attracting qualified applicants. Come see us at 
Booth #1841 for show special pricing and more 
information. 

GameSpy 

18002 Skypark Circle 
Irvine, CA 92614 
Phone: 949-798-4200 
Fax:949-798-4299 
www.gamespy.net 
Booth 1436 

GameSpy is the leading provider of enabling 
technology for online, multiplayer gaming. The 
company's "Powered by GameSpy" products, 
tools and services are the de facto standard in 
the games industry for infrastructure and 
technology for online gaming. More than 80 
publishers embed GameSpy technology into 
PC and PS2 games, covering hundreds of titles 
from every major videogame publisher. 
GameSpy offers four distinct toolkits that 
provide Matchmaking, Community, 
Administrative, and Networking functionality 
for games. In addition, GameSpy has compre- 
hensive Consulting, File Hosting, and Beta 
Testing services for PC and console games. 
More information and a GameSpy evaluation 
packages can be found at www.gamespy.net 

Genemation 

Incubator Building, Grafton Street 

Manchester, M13 9XX 

United Kingdom 

Phone: +44 161 275 5139 

Fax: +44161 275 5139 

www.genemation.com 

Booth 1443 

Genemation™ develops face synthesis tools 

that enable digital content creators to create 

and animate thousands of synthetic photo 

realistic 3D heads, and create and animate 3D 

heads of their own 2D IP images. 

Genemation's range of low and high 

resolution meshes can be used, or the users 

can use their own meshes in the tools. 



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EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



GenHead™ is Genemation's first face synthesis tool that enables the 
creation of thousands of synthetic photo realistic 3D heads that can be 
animated and exported into industry standard art animation packages. 
Users own 2D IP, e.g. sports and film stars can be quickly animated and 
3D targets created. Artists can use Genemation's low to high resolution 
meshes or their own. Boned heads output will an option after GDC 

Gigex, Inc. 

i Sutter Street, Suite 500 

San Francisco, CA 94104 

Phone:415-227-4770 

www.gigex.com 

Booth 542 

Gigex is a leading game promotion and distribution company reaching 

over 24 million gamers each month through its site and a network of 

over 130 affiliated sites and portals. Gigex is the leader in the game 

downloads and has 8 years of unrivaled experience promoting hundreds 

of major game titles for leading publishers. 

Gigex's leading Product Launch service for game demos and trailers 

includes free consumer downloads (without P2P or paid service), 

bandwidth and hosting, distribution to over 100 affiliated sites, free links 

for your site, advertising promotion and tracking all at reasonable rates. 

Havok 

657 Mission Street, Suite 600 

San Francisco, CA 94105 

Phone:415-543-4620 

www.havok.com 

ES128 

Havok is the developer of Havok 2, the fastest, most flexible and robust 

cross platform gameplay dynamics and physics solution available. Over 

70 top game developers such as Bungie, Cyan, EA, Ion Storm, Nihilistic, 

Pandemic, People Can Fly, Red Storm, Remedy, Sammy, Sega, Shiny, Sony 

Cambridge, Turbine, VUG and Z-Axis have licensed Havok 2 for their 

titles. 

Havok 2 provides a dynamics workflow framework with Max and Maya 
exporters, XML serialization, visual debugging and profiling tools. Havok 
2's complete and customizable solution with collision detection, rigid 
body physics, character controller, vehicles, ragdolls and bone dynamics 
is easily integrated with 3rd-party/in-house rendering engines including 
RenderWare, Unreal, Gamebryo, and Source and is optimized for 
PlayStation(c)2, Xbox™, GameCube™ and PC. 

Image Metrics 

2nd Floor, Regent House, Heaton Lane 

Stockport, SK41BS 

United Kingdom 

Phone: +44 161 476 8220 

Fax: +44 161 480 4583 

www.image-metrics.com 

Booth 1716 

Image Metrics is a computer vision company serving the game and 

feature animation markets. Clients include some of the world's leading 

game publishers and feature studios. Image Metrics provides statistical 

modeling technology that can be deployed to create special effects, 

dramatically reducing the time and cost of developing facial animation. 

Image Metrics provides data services and software for facial animation 

and special effects work, such as object tracking. Based on proprietary 

technology with over 50 man-years of research in computer vision, 

Image Metrics provide technical solutions that save many years of 

production time in both gaming and feature effects. 



Immersion Corporation 

801 Fox Lane 

San Jose, CA 95131 

Phone: 408-467-1900 

Fax:408-467-1901 

www.immersion.com 

Booth 1244 and MR 4403 

Founded in 1993, Immersion Corporation is a recognized leader in 

developing, licensing and marketing digital touch technology and 

products. Bringing value to markets where man-machine interaction 

needs to be made more compelling, safer or productive, Immersion's 

technology is deployed across personal computing, mobile, 

entertainment, medical training, automotive and three-dimensional 

simulation markets. 

IN-FUSIO 

Le Millenium 12 qual de Queyries 

Bordeaux Cedex 33072 

France 

Phone:+33557-773-815 

Fax: +33 556-400-548 

www.in-fusio.com 

MP 1330-3 

IN-FUSIO™ is the number one mobile games service provider for wireless 

carriers in Europe and China, and started its expansion in the US in 2003 

(acquisition of US mobile game developer, Cybiko). IN-FUSIO provides a 

clear entry point for game developers to effortlessly enter the mobile 

games market. From stand-alone Java™, BREW™ and ExEn® games to a 

fully managed games service, IN-FUSIO has unrivalled industry 

experience. 

IN-FUSIO publishes and ditributes games at the major global wireless 
carriers. In-FUSIO provides carriers with a range of services, which aim at 
increasing trafic and end-users loyalty. 

Info-communications Development Authority of Singapore 

8 Temasek Boulevard, #14-00 Suntec Tower Three 

Singapore 038988 

Singapore 

Phone: +65 6211 0888 

Fax: +65 6211 2216 

www.ida.gov.sg 

Booth 1430 

The Singapore Pavilion is led by the Infocomm Development Authority 

of Singapore (IDA). In the fast-changing and converging spheres of 

telecommunications, information and media technologies, IDA will be 

the catalyst for change in Singapore's evolution into a vibrant key 

Infocomm hub. Visit our Pavilion and find out more about opportunities 

for collaboration in the regional markets. 

Intel Corporation 

2200 Mission College Boulevard 

Santa Clara, CA 95054 

Phone:408-765-8080 

www.intel.com 

Booth 1116 

Intel is a world leader in gaming platform performance and technology 

innovation. Intel products can be found in many of the best desktops, 

laptops, handhelds, servers, and soon in living room entertainment 

devices used for gaming the world over. Whether your title takes 

advantage of cutting-edge technology for hardcore gamers, or you're 

targeting value-minded mainstream gamers, or you're looking for a cost- 




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EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



effective backend solution for online gaming, 
Intel can help you accelerate the successful 
development and deployment of your game 
software. Come visit our booth (#1116) to learn 
about new platforms and technologies and 
sign up for Intel® Developer Services. 

Booth CP 2026 

Intel's Chipset Products Division, the leading 
supplier of graphics chipsets for mobile and 
desktop platforms, has positions for next 
generation lead technical architects, 
developers, and test engineers in the areas of 
3D, video, display, video BIOS, and audio. 
Recruiters will be on hand to provide more 
information on Software Engineering. 

Interactive Data Visualization, Inc. I 
SpeedTree 

1233 Washington Street, Suite 610 

Columbia, SC 29201 

Phone: 803-233-0073 

Fax: 803-978-7543 

www.idvinc.com 

Booth 1044 

Interactive Data Visualization, Inc., (IDV) 

develops and markets the SpeedTree™ suite of 

tree creation tools, including SpeedTreeRT, 

which brings realistic, animated, and efficient 

trees to real time games and simulations 

through a highly flexible tree creation 

interface. IDV also provides 3D software 

development services to military and 

industrial firms. 

SpeedTreeRT™, a Front Line Award finalist for 
2003, delivers low-polygon, highly realistic 
trees, with adjustable wind effects, seamless 
LOD transitions, and a huge variety of trees 
from an included library of many trees and 
species. SpeedTreeRT includes SpeedTreeCAD, a 
Windows application used to create and edit 
animated trees in real-time. 

International Game Developers 
Association 

600 Harrison Street, 6th floor 

San Francisco, CA 94107 

Phone:415-947-6235 

Fax:415-947-6090 

www.igda.org 

Vista Point 

The International Came Developers 

Association is a non-profit membership 

organization that advocates globally on issues 

related to digital game creation. The IGDA's 

mission is to strengthen the international 

game development community and effect 

change to benefit that community. For more 

information on the ICDA, please visit 

www.igda.org or e-mail info@igda.org. 



In2Games Limited 

The White House 

Trout Rise 

Loudwater 

Hertfordshire WD34JR 

United Kingdom 

Phone: +44 1923 774123 

Fax: +44 1923 770210 

Booth 1344 

ln2Games creates new and exciting gaming 

experiences through the creative combination 

of hardware and software. The team has a 

long history in innovative games hardware 

design and manufacture, and leading-edge 

software development, resulting in a new 

range of console products offering gamers 

brand-new experiences. 

Gametrak™ is a revolutionary, low-cost 
videogames controller, giving precise and 
intuitive control in 3D space. Unlike cameras, 
infra-red, RF or tilt technologies, Gametrak™ 
allows movement forwards, backwards, up, 
down, left and right with no lag or processor 
overhead. Come and see Black Wind, our PS2 
first-person fighting game, launching August 
2004. 

iPark Silicon Valley 

3003 N. First Street 
San Jose, CA 95134 
Phone: 408-432-5000 
Fax:408-432-5020 
www.iparksv.com 
Booth 1227 

"The U.S. Gateway for Korea's Digital Content 
Leaders." iPark Silicon Valley (iParkSV) is a 
Korean government subsidized agency, a not- 
for-profit organization, and promotes Korean 
Digital Contents developers to US publishers. 
We connect leading Korean developers with 
U.S. partners to expand mutual market share, 
increase revenue opportunities resulting in 
mutual long term success. iParkSV creates 
partnerships between U.S. distributors and 
publishers and has access to a portfolio of 
over 2,100 Korean digital content companies. 

Our portfolio companies' products can 
improve profit margin significantly for U.S. 
publishers with products in a broad range of 
categories including: Digital Content and 
Streaming Media, Online Games, Console 
Games, Wireless Technology and Games, 
Arcade Games, PC Games, Mobile Games and 
Content, Handheld Game Solution and Game 
Developer Software. 

IT GlobalSecure Inc. 

P.O. Box 53330 
Washington, DC 20009 
Phone:202-332-5878 
Fax: 202-478-1743 



www.secureplay.com 
Booth 419 

IT GlobalSecure develops elegant security 
technologies and products for clients 
worldwide since 2000. IT GlobalSecure and its 
affiliates hold U.S. and International patents 
for SecurePlay technology plus additional 
patents pending in transaction protection, 
financial security, and access management. 
SecurePlay™ is IT GlobalSecure 's software to 
protect network games. 

SecurePlay network game security middleware 
provides core "secure game transactions" so 
that games can be played fairly. SecurePlay 
protects everything from downloaded wireless 
and Internet web site games in Java and Flash 
to sports and role-playing games for PCs and 
consoles; from advergames to subscription, 
regulated, and pay-for-play games. 

Kayak Interactive 

212 Carnegie Center, Suite 201 
Princeton, NJ 08540 
Phone: 609-945-7240 
Fax: 609-510-1202 
www.kayakinteractive.com 
MP 1330-4 

Kayak Interactive™ is a software company that 
leverages its distributed computing 
experience to solve the tough problems in 
mobile, multiplayer gaming. Kayak's software 
and GSP services deliver convenient and 
compelling user experiences, simplify 
multiplayer game creation for developers and 
provide carriers and publishers flexible 
community features for growing multiplayer 
revenues. 

Kayak Interactive™ offers three integrated 
product offerings. Kayak Live is an operations 
and management platform for hosting, 
delivering, and monitoring multiplayer games. 
Developers use Kayak Studio to build 
multiplayer games for delivery on Kayak Live. 
Content providers, publishers and carriers use 
Kayak Community to build loyal groups of 
users. 

Logitech, Inc. 

6505 Kaiser Drive 

Fremont, CA 94555 

Phone: 510-795-8500 

Fax: 510-792-8901 

www.logitech.com 

Booth 1008 

Founded in 1981, Logitech designs, 

manufactures and markets personal interface 

products that enable people to effectively 

work, play, and communicate in the digital 

world. 

Logitech designs, manufactures and markets a 



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I 

EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



wide variety of innovative peripherals for PC and console. On display will 
be the latest force feedback wheels and 2.4GHz cordless peripherals for 
PC, PlayStation 2, Xbox and GameCube. Logitech will also be leading 
interactive presentations on new technologies. 

Lucas Arts 

P.O. Box 10307 

San Rafael, CA 94912 

Phone:415-472-3400 

www.lucasarts.com 

Booth CP 1941 

A Force In Interactive Entertainment For More Than Two Decades 

Celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2002, LucasArts is a leading publisher 

and developer of interactive entertainment for video game console 

systems and personal computers. The company was founded by 

filmmaker George Lucas to provide an interactive element to his vision 

of a state-of-the-art, multi-faceted entertainment company. Since its 

inception in 1982, LucasArts has continually been heralded for its focus 

on creating rich, immersive worlds for players to discover. LucasArts 

games continually receive critical acclaim and attain commercial 

success, with the company's products often earning Game of the Year 

honors, including multiple awards from the Academy of Interactive Arts 

& Sciences. 

While the characters, settings and styles of games in the company's 
portfolio may be diverse, every game shares an attention to detail that 
has become the hallmark of LucasArts. The company prides itself on 
creating interactive journeys that succeed both as games and as stories. 
In turn, players feel like they are not only playing a game, but actually 
living the life of the game's hero - experiencing the character's 
triumphs, tragedies, and even moments of levity as can only be 
portrayed by the talented designers at LucasArts. 

Magnatune 

2070 Allston Way, Suite 102 

Berkeley, CA 94704 

Phone: 510-684-4175 

Fax:410-217-6374 

www.magnatune.com 

Booth 1247 

Magnatune offers online music licensing without a straightforward 

price calculator and standard terms. Our artists receive 50% of all sales, 

and all our music can be previewed online. We have everything from 

Electronica, Metal/Punk, Pop/Rock, New Age, World and Classical. Pick up 

free compilation CDs at our booth. 

Magnatune offers online music licensing without a straightforward 
price calculator and standard terms. Our artists receive 50% of all sales, 
and all our music can be previewed online. We have everything from 
Electronica, Metal/Punk, Pop/Rock, New Age, World and Classical. Pick up 
free compilation CDs at our booth. 

Majesco Games 

160 Raritan Center Parkway 

Edison, NJ 08837 

Phone:732-225-8910 

Fax:732-225-8408 

www.majescogames.com 

Booth CP1837 

Established in 1986 Majesco Games is one of the fastest-growing 

publishers and distributors of interactive entertainment products for the 

Microsoft Xbox® video game system, Sony PlayStation®2 computer 

entertainment system, and Nintendo GameCube™ and Game Boy® 



Advance systems, as well as the personal computer. 
Majesco will be at the show actively soliciting game developers for new 
and exciting titles to publish. To schedule appointments please contact 
Catherine Biebelberg at Cbiebelberg@majescosales.com. Please include 
company bio with staff roster, industry experience, games completed as 
a company (not individuals of the company) and relevant web links in 
your email. 

Maryland State Department of Business and Economic 
Development 

217 E. Redwood Street, 12th Floor 
Baltimore, MD 21202 
Phone: 1-888-CHOOSEMD 
Fax:410-333-6792 
www.choosemaryland.org 
Booth 1534 

Maryland is home to the East Coast's largest cluster of interactive 
electronic entertainment and education companies producing prize- 
winning games as well as serious simulation training in the medical and 
military industries. Our Department of Business and Economic 
Development offers site-location assistance, tax incentives and 
workforce development programs, www.choosemaryland.org, 1-888- 
CHOOSEMD. 

Mascot Capsule Inc. 

1300 Crittenden Lane, Suite 105 

Mountain View, CA 94301 

Phone: 650-776-7867 

Fax:650-962-0719 

www.mascotcapsule.com 

Booth 435 

Mascot Capsule, a division of HI Corporation, is the world leader in 

mobile 3D graphics solutions and content. The standards-based Mascot 

Capsule Micro3D Engine has been delivered in 30M+ handsets from 20+ 

manufacturers worldwide and has an available content catalog with 

over 300 unique games, screen savers, and other applications. 

Maxon Computer, Inc. 

2640 Lavery Court, Suite A 

Newbury Park, CA 91320 

Phone:805-376-3333 

Fax: 805-376-3331 

www.maxon.net 

Booth 1144 

MAXON Computer is one of the world's leading publishers of 3D 

modeling, painting, animation and rendering software. It's flagship 

products, CINEMA 4D and BodyPaint 3D are widely used in film, 

broadcast, multimedia and the sciences. Both products are highly 

regarded for their affordability, stability, ease of use and lightning fast 

workflow. 

BodyPaint 3D is the ultimate 3D-painting program for digital artists 

creating textures or mattes. An artist can paint on up to ten material 

channels with ten textures/colors concurrently bringing all material 

channels together instantly. Painting in raytrace mode is possible for 

instant feedback. Plugins for Maya, 3dsMax, Lightwave and Softimage. 

Metrowerks 

7700 West Parmer Lane 
Austin, Texas 78729 
Phone: 512-996-5300 
Fax:512-995-5405 
www.metrowerks.com 
Booth 628 



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EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



Metrowerks and Sony Ericsson empower 
developers with tools, knowledge and 
technology. CodeWarrior offers the broadest 
suite of development options for PS2, 
GAMECUBE™, Game Boy™ Advance and 
wireless devices. Sony Ericsson arms 
developers with documentation, tools, 
training, and technical support for wireless 
game development. Metrowerks and Sony 
Ericsson - Enabling Evolutionary Game 
Development. (Metrowerks - 
www.metrowerks.com/games, Sony Ericsson 
www.sonyericsson.com/developer) 

Microboards Technology, Inc. 

8150 Mallory Court 

P.O. Box 846 

Chanhassen, MN 55317 

Phone:952-556-1600 

Fax:952-556-1620 

www.microboards.com 

Booth 1526 

Microboards Technology is a manufacturer 

and distributor of CD and DVD Recordable 

Technology Products. Microboards offers 

equipment for duplicating, printing and 

recording on disc, as well as media, 

consumables, and storage equipment. 

Traditionally known for their award-winning 

duplicators, Microboards is also a distributor 

of prominent brands in the recordable 

technology arena, including Pioneer, Rimage, 

and Taiyo Yuden. 

Microsoft Windows Gaming & Graphics 
Technologies 

One Microsoft Way 
Redmond, WA 98052 
Phone:425-882-8080 
www.msdn.microsoft.com/directx 
Booth 818 

Founded in 1975, Microsoft (Nasdaq "MSFT") is 
the worldwide leader in software, services and 
Internet technologies for personal and 
business computing. The company offers a 
wide range of products and services designed 
to empower people through great software - 
any time, any place and on any device. 

Microsoft® DirectX® is an advanced suite of 
multimedia APIs built into Microsoft Windows 
operating systems. This standard platform 
enables software developers to access 
specialized hardware features without having 
to write hardware-specific code. DirectX 
debuted in 1995 and quickly became a 
recognized standard for multimedia 
application development on the Windows 
platform. 



Xbox 

One Microsoft Way 

Redmond, WA 98052 

Phone:425-882-8080 

Fax:425-936-7329 

www.xbox.com 

ES116 

Xbox (www.xbox.com) is the video game 

system from Microsoft that brings people 

together for the most exhilarating game and 

entertainment experiences. Xbox delivers an 

expansive collection of breakthrough games, 

powerful hardware and the unified Xbox tive 

online service. The tag line, "It's good to play 

together," captures the spirit of Xbox as the 

social hub of the new digital entertainment 

lifestyle. Xbox is now available in North 

America, Asia, Europe and Australia. 

Midway 

2727 W. Roscoe Street 

Chicago, IL 60618 

Phone:773-961-2368 

Fax:773-961-2376 

www.midway.com 

Booth CP1842 

Midway Games Inc. is a leading developer and 

publisher of interactive entertainment 

software available on PlayStation®2, Xbox™, 

GameCube™ and Game Boy® Advance. 

Midway has been a leader in the industry 

since the dawn of the video game revolution, 

with early breakthrough titles including Pong, 

Defender and Spy Hunter. Recent blockbuster 

titles include Ready 2 Rumble Boxing, Hydro 

Thunder, NFL Blitz and the Mortal Kombat 

series. 

Mobile Entertainment Analyst 

650 Cambridge Street 
Cambridge, MA 02141 
Phone: 617-621-0875 
Fax: 240-214-8310 
www.mobenta.com 
Booth 1708 

Mobile Entertainment Analyst 
(www.mobenta.com) is the leading hub for 
decision makers in the mobile entertainment 
industry. Encompassing a website, our weekly 
email newsletter (www.mobenta.com/wir), 
our monthly industry journal 
(www.mobenta.com/mea) and the market 
analysis tools in our Wireless Content Tracking 
Service (www.mobenta.com/wcts), Mobile 
Entertainment Analyst provides our industry 
with insightful, actionable information. 

Monolith Productions 

10516 NE 37th Circle 
Kirkland.WA 98033 
Phone:425-739-1500 
Fax:425-827-3901 



www.lith.com/jobs 
Booth CP 1830 

Monolith Productions is currently developing 
The Matrix™ Online and three unannounced 
titles. Please visit us at our Job Fair Booth. We 
are seeking self-motivated, talented, and 
experienced people who thrive in a collabo- 
rative environment. We are actively recruiting 
Producers, Designers, Programmers, Artists, 
QA, and Online personnel. Monolith offers 
competitive salaries/benefits. 

Morgan Kaufmann Publishers 

500 Sansome Street, Suite 400 

San Francisco, CA 94111 

Phone:415-392-2665 

Fax:415-982-2665 

www.mkp.com 

Booth 415 

Morgan Kaufmann publishes the finest books 

on computer graphics and game 

programming. MK titles include plenty of 

source code implementations, cover the 

fundamental ideas of a field, and are written 

by authors who are themselves practicing 

game engineers or researchers. 

New titles now available in the Morgan 
Kaufmann Series in Interactive 3D Technology 
include Game Physics by David H. Eberly, 
Essential Mathematics for Games and 
Interactive Applications by James M. Van Verth 
and Lars Bishop, and Collision Detection in 
Interactive 3D Environments by Gino van den 
Bergen. 

NaturalMotion Limited 

1st Floor, Chester House 

George Street 

Osford, OXON 

United Kingdom 

OX1 2A4 

Phone:+44 1865250575 

Fax:+44 1865250577 

www.naturalmotion.com 

Booth 650 

NaturalMotion is the creator of endorphin, the 

next-generation real-time animation tool. 

endorphin uses Al and biomechanical physics 

to create character animation up to ioox 

faster than traditional animation techniques. 

Customers include WETA (for Lord of the Rings 

- The Return of the King), MPC (for Troy) and 

several high-profile games publishers. 

Nelly moser, Inc. 

11 Water Street 
Arlington, MA 02476 
Phone:781-646-1515 
Fax: 781-574-6606 
www.nellymoser.com 
NTP 656-5 



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EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



Nellymoser is the leading provider of voice solutions for online PC and 
console gaming. Our technology can be found in over 70 Xbox Live and 
Sony P52 online titles, including SOCOM 2. We are an authorized Sony 
PS2 Tools and Middleware company. Stop by our booth for a free eval. 

Nellymoser's Online Voice SDK allows game developers to add voice 
capability to PC and console online games. The SDK features resource 
efficient, high-quality narrow bandwidth speech compression with add- 
on voice activity detection, voice modification, N-by-i decoding, and 
automatic lip synchronization. These features further game play options 
by offering advanced voice capabilities in an integrated framework. 

NewTek 

5131 Beckwith Boulevard 

San Antonio, TX 78249 

Phone: 210-370-8000 

www.newtek.com 

Booth 644 

NewTek is a leading provider of full-featured video editing, animation 

and special effects tools including VT[3] T ", and Lightwave 3D®, winner of 

the 2003 Primetime Emmy® Engineering Award. Lightwave 3D is a 

complete 3D production solution that combines a state-of-the-art 

photo-real renderer with intuitive and powerful modeling and 

animation tools. Recent game titles include Doom III, Unreal 

Tournament, Serious Sam for XBox, Age of Mythology, Civilization III, 

Dead to Rights, Baldur's Gate II, Everouest and Escape from Monkey 

Island. 

Nintendo of America Inc. 

4820 150th Ave NE 

Redmond, WA 98052 

Phone:425-882-2040 

www.nintendo.com 

Booth CP1921 

Nintendo Co., Ltd., of Kyoto, Japan, is the acknowledged worldwide 

leader and innovator in the creation of interactive entertainment. To 

date, Nintendo has sold more than 1.4 billion video games worldwide, 

created such industry icons as Mario and Donkey Kong and launched 

franchises like The Legend of Zelda and Pokemon. Nintendo 

manufactures and markets hardware and software for its popular home 

video systems, including Nintendo GameCube and Game Boy® - the 

world's best-selling video game system. 

Nokia 

6000 Connection Drive 

Irving, TX 75062 

Phone: 972-894-6472 

Fax:972-894-4114 

www.forum.nokia.com 

Booth 416 

Stop by the Nokia booth and get your hands on the latest Nokia devices, 

including the N-Gage™ Mobile Game Deck, and pick up the tools and 

technical documentation you need to help you get started in mobile 

gaming. And if you can't make it to the booth, catch our sponsored 

sessions during the show and find all of our resources for games 

developers at www.forum.nokia.com/games. 

Nokia's developer platform approach is designed to help developers 
build and deliver mobile games to a global audience in less time, with 
less effort and cost than required to support a collection of unrelated 
devices. Developers interesting in building mobile games for Nokia 
developer platforms, including the N-Gage Mobile Game Deck, should 
visit the Nokia booth or go to www.forum.nokia.com. 



Numerical Design Limited (NDL) 

1506 East Franklin Street, Suite 302 
Chapel Hill, NC 27514 
Phone: 919-929-2917 
Fax:919-967-3237 
www.ndl.com 
Booth 1036 

NDL develops the Gamebryo 3D Graphics Engine and Toolset, a cross- 
platform engine for the PC, PlayStation2, Xbox, and GameCube. Mythic 
Entertainment (Dark Age of Camelot), Firaxis (Pirates!), Blue Fang, and 
Bethesda Softworks (Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind) are just four of the 
many developers using Gamebryo. 

NDL announces a release 1.1 of the Gamebryo C++ 3D Graphics Engine 
and Toolset, featuring support for the pixel and vertex shaders, tools 
that allow artists to easily access those shaders, and significant 
performance improvements on all platforms, a cross platform engine for 
the PC, PlayStation2, Xbox, and GameCube. Mythic Entertainment (Dark 
Age of Camelot), Firaxis (Pirates!), Blue Fang, and Bethesda Softworks 
(Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind) are just four of the many developers using 
NDL software. 

NVIDIA 

2701 San Tomas Expressway 

Santa Clara, CA 95050 

Phone: 408-486-2000 

Fax:408-486-2200 

www.nvidia.com 

Booth 808, ES 245, ES 249, CP 1821 

NVIDIA Corporation is the worldwide leader in graphics processors and 

media communications devices. The unmatched breadth of the NVIDIA 

product line enriches 3D and 2D graphics, video, audio, communications, 

broadband connectivity and television for every audience and platform 

including desktop PCs, game consoles, workstations, Internet-enabled 

appliances, Apple Macintosh, mobile PCs and handheld devices. NVIDIA 

was recently voted one of the '100 Best Companies To Work For' by 

Fortune Magazine. 

NXN Software 

321 Hampton Dr., Suite 201 
Venice, CA 90291 
Phone:310-393-8535 
Fax: 310-394-1366 
www.nxn-software.com 
Booth 423 & MR 4405 

NXN Software - Booth 423 NXN Software is the leading provider of asset 
management systems to the game development industry. Our award- 
winning asset management system is used by many of the world's best 
game developers. Come by booth #423 to see our latest version or 
contact Stephen Peacock (speacock@nxn-software.com) for a one-on- 
one meeting. 

NXN alienbrain Studio - Booth 423 Version 7 of NXN alienbrain Studio is 
here! Highlighting usability, flexibility and scalability, this powerful 
upgrade to NXN's award-winning asset management system is 
designed to improve team performance. Come by booth #423 for a 
demo or contact Stephen Peacock (speacock@nxn-software.com) for a 
one-on-one meeting. 

Oddworld Inhabitants, Inc. 

869 Monterey Street 
San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 
Phone: 805-503-3000 







EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



Fax:805-503-3030 

www.oddworld.com 
Booth CP 2037 

Oddworld Inhabitants® was formed in 1994 by 
Visual Effects industry veterans Sherry 
McKenna and Lome Lanning. Previous award 
winning titles include Oddworld: Abe's 
Oddysee®, Oddworld: Abe's Exoddus® and 
Oddworld: Munch's Oddysee®. Located in 
beautiful San Luis Obispo, California, their 
facility attracts top talent from all over the 
world. 

Production is nearing completion on their 
fourth title, set to release in 2004. This latest 
installment takes place on Oddworld, but 
brings all new characters and gameplay into 
the mix, along with action and strategy from a 
first/third person perspective. 

Palmsource 

1240 Crossman Avenu 
Sunnyvale, CA 94089 
Phone:408-400-1822 
www.palmsource.com/developers 
MP 1330-1 

PalmSource (NASDAQ: PSRC) is the company 
behind Palm OS, that enables the creation of 
powerful, innovative and easy-to-use smart 
mobile devices. PalmSource licenses Palm OS 
to leading smart mobile information device 
manufacturers, including Aceeca, AlphaSmart, 
Fossil, Founder Technology, Carmin, GSL, 
HuneTec, Kyocera, Lenovo, palmOne, 
PerComm, Samsung, Sony, Symbol 
Technologies and Tapwave. 

Peach Pit/New Riders 

1249 Eighth Street 

Berkeley CA 94710 

Phone: 510-524-2178 

Fax: 510-524-2221 

www.peachpit.com 

Booth 546 

NRG (New Riders Games) publishes books on 

game programming, design, and audio. Our 

books are written by the industry's leading 

experts and gaming innovators. NRG is an 

imprint of Peachpit which also publishes 

Peachpit Press, New Riders, Adobe Press, Apple 

Pro Series and Macromedia Press. 

NRG game books titles include: Chris Crawford 
on Came Design, Came Creation and Careers: 
Insider Secrets from Industry Experts, Came 

I Architecture and Design: A New Edition and 
Designing Virtual Worlds. Written by the top 

l industry experts our books have the latest and 
hottest insight for game developers and 
designers. 



Peer 1 Network 

1600-555 West Hastings Street 

Vancouver, BC V6B4N5 

Canada 

Phone:866-683-7747 

www.peeri.net 

Booth 1546 

Peer 1 Network, provider of co-location and 

performance bandwidth, know that LATENCY 

KILLS - that's why our network was built for 

serious gamers. Peer 1 consistently delivers 

low ping times, guarantees 100% uptime, zero 

packet loss on our network and 24 hour or less 

provisioning times. The Peer 1 data centers are 

located in Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal, New 

York, Ashburn, Chicago, Seattle and San Jose. 

Perforce Software 

2320 Blanding Avenue 

Alameda, CA 94501 

Phone: 510-864-7400 

Fax: 510-864-5340 

www.perforce.com 

Booth 1243 

Perforce Software develops, markets, and 

supports Perforce, the Fast Software 

Configuration Management System. 

Headquartered in Alameda, Calif., Perforce 

Software has international operations in 

Europe, Japan and Israel. In addition to 

application software companies, Perforce 

customers represent a broad range of 

industries including the games, electronics, 

pharmaceutical and financial services 

markets. 

The Perforce Software Configuration 
Management System manages the changes 
developers make writing code and creating 
digital assets. Perforce is fast, easy to use and 
administer, and provides rich functionality - 
including version control, workspace 
management, atomic change transactions, 
and a powerful branching model - on more 
than 50 platforms. 

Premier Press, a division of Course 
Technology PTR 

25 Thomson Place 

Boston, MA 02210 

Phone: 617-757-7900 

Fax: 617-757-7985 

www.courseptr.com 

Booth 425 

Course Technology PTR is a division of Course 

Technology, the worldwide leader in computer 

education products and part of the Thomson 

Corporation, the world's largest provider of 

professional learning solutions. Course 

Technology PTR publishes comprehensive 

reference books focusing on game 

development, animation, graphics, music 



technology, and interactive audio CD-ROMs. 
The Premier Press Game Development books 
are dedicated exclusively to game developers. 
Whether you are a beginner to the world of 
game programming, an experienced hobbyist 
looking for the latest tips and techniques, or a 
professional game developer keeping up with 
technology trends, you'll find the guidance 
you're looking for. 

Premier Search Inc 

310 E.Warm Springs Road 

Las Vegas, NV 89119 

Phone:702-222-3633 

Fax:702-222-3626 

www.premier-search.net 

Booth CP 1826 

Getting to know you is how we can best assist 

in targeting the right career opportunities 

with top quality people who match skill, 

experience AND personality requirements. 

While providing professional, reliable and 

committed searches, we also establish and 

maintain a bond with you, whether you are 

our client or candidate. You'll soon realize that 

working with us means becoming a part of 

our family. Let us help you build, or become 

part of, a perfect team. 

RAD Game Tools, Inc. 

401 Park Place #103 

Kirkland.WA 98033 

Phone: 425-893-4300 

Fax:425-893-9111 

www.radgametools.com 

Booth 1016 

RAD Game Tools will be showing all of their 

impressive technology products: Pixomatic 

Rendering Technology (Michael Abrash and 

Mike Sartain's software Renderer), Bink Video 

(their popular video codec) which is now 

shipping for Sony PS/2, Granny 3D (their new 

character and dynamic 3D animation run-time 

library, and the Miles Sound System, now 

available for Xbox. 

RAD will be showing new version of all of its 
products. Bink now supports the PS/2 along 
with Xbox, GameCube, PC, and Mac. Pixomatic 
2 now includes a full DX7 feature set. The 
Miles Sound System now supports the Xbox 
and soon PS/2. Finally, the latest Granny will 
also be shown for Xbox, GameCube, PC, Mac 
and PS/2. 

Radical Entertainment Inc. 

369 Terminal Avenue, 8th Floor 

Vancouver B.C. V6A 4C4 

Canada 

Phone: 604-602-2659 

www.radical.ca 

Booth CP 2038 



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EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



We are always looking for talented individuals who share our passion for 
this industry. If you have the commitment needed to create 
entertainment that captures the world's imagination, if you want to 
know the meaning of true success, we want to hear from you. 

Rainbow Studios 

4001 N 3rd Street, Suite 310 

Phoenix, AZ 85012 

Phone: 602-230-1300 

Fax: 602-266-6320 

www.rainbowstudios.com 

Booth CP1926 

Rainbow Studios has been putting out great games for more than ten 

years now. Beautiful artwork, cutting-edge technology and a great sense 

of fun come together to produce some pretty kick-ass games. It's a place 

where creativity and critical thinking aren't just amply rewarded, they're 

an absolute must. 

RealNetworks, Inc. 

2601 Elliott Avenue 

Seattle, WA 98121 

Phone: 206-674-2316 

Fax: 206-674-2599 

www.real.com 

Booth 1318 

Real is the leading creator of digital media services and software 

including RealArcade PC games service, Rhapsody Internet jukebox 

service, and RealPlayer 10, which enables consumers to find, play and 

manage digital content. Consumers can access and experience PC 

games and audio/video programming, and download Real's consumer 

software at www.real.com. 

RealArcade offers consumers a fun, unique and compelling way to 
discover, acquire and play PC games, bringing together a wide array of 
games and services in a single, easy to use environment. RealArcade 
provides play-before-you-pay access to the best in downloadable, free 
online Web games, broadband games, and Palm games. 

Red Storm Entertainment 

3200 Gateway Centre Boulevard, Suite 100 
Morrisville, NC 27560 
Phone: 919-460-1776 
Fax: 919-468-3305 
www.redstorm.com 
Booth CP 1930 

Ubisoft Entertainment is an international producer, publisher and 
distributor of interactive entertainment products and is one of the top 
10 video game publishers in the world. Founded in 1986 in France, 
Ubisoft is now present on every continent, both through offices in 21 
different countries including the United States, Morocco, Germany and 
China and through sales of products in over 50 countries. One of 
Ubisoft's main development studios in the United States is Red Storm 
Entertainment, based in Morrisville, North Carolina. Red Storm was co- 
founded by best selling author Tom Clancy and Ubisoft acquired the 
studio in August of 2000. Red Storm's best-selling products like Tom 
Clancy's Ghost Recon contributed to Ubisoft's sales of 453 million euros 
for the 2002/2003 fiscal year, up 23% over the previous fiscal year. To 
learn more, visit www.ubi.com 

Relic Entertainment Inc. 

#400-948 Homer Street 
Vancouver B.C. V6B2W7 
Canada 



Phone: 604-801-6577 

Fax: 604-801-6578 

www.relic.com 

Booth CP 1937 

Relic Entertainment is a cutting edge developer. Relic's 1997 debut 

Homeworld was received with incredible praise. PC GAMER, the world's 

best selling game magazine, gave it a 93%. Homeworld's success was 

followed up by the critically acclaimed Homeworld 2 and Impossible 

Creatures. Join us -there's lot's more to come! 

Relic's debut product, Homeworld launched in 1997 and won the "Game 
of the Year" from PC Carrier and Computer Gaming World's "Strategy 
Game of the Year." In 2003 Relic released Impossible Creatures, a 3D, 
Real-Time Strategy (RTS) game set in the 1930s and in late 2003, Relic 
launched Homeworld 2. 

S3 Graphics 

1045 Mission Court 

Fremont, CA 94539 

Phone: 510-687-4900 

Fax: 510-687-4901 

www.s3gra phics.com 

Booth 744 

S3 Graphics Inc. is a supplier of state-of-the-art graphics solutions to 

desktop and mobile PC markets as well as the rapidly evolving game 

console arena. 

S3 Graphics Inc. is currently demonstrating their latest Hi-Def, DX9 
graphics processors offering capabilities well beyond just outstanding 
graphics performance and quality. Also showing is an exciting new 
direction that puts S3 Graphics squarely in the latest game console 
trend that promises to give vast title access to the extreme gamer. 

Savannah College of Art and Design 

PO Box 2072 

Savannah, GA 31402 

Phone:912-525-5100 

Fax: 912-525-5986 

www.scad.edu 

Booth 1542 

Savannah College of Art and Design exists to prepare talented students 

for careers in the visual and performing arts, design, the building arts, 

and history of art and architecture. For information, call 800.869-7223 or 

912-525-5100 or visit the college on the World Wide Web at 

www.scad.edu. E-mail may be sent to info@scad.edu 

ScanSoft 

695 Atlantic Avenue 

Boston, MA 02111 

Phone: 617-428-4444 

Fax: 617-428-1122 

www.scansoft.com 

Booth 1147 

ScanSoft is a world leader in speech and language solutions enabling 

application developers to add state-of-the-art technology to their 

applications. ScanSoft has a number of speech technologies which can 

be easily integrated with games and edutainment titles; these 

technologies can significantly enhance and bring market differentiation 

to any product. 

Speech recognition is well suited to numerous applications such as 
adventure and role playing games offering greater interactivity and an 
improved overall gaming experience. Speech adds a fun dimension, 
bringing characters to life. With eight titles deployed, ScanSoft is the 
only company to offer an SDK for the Sony PS2. 




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EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



SN Systems Ltd. 

4th Floor, Redcliff Quay 

120 Redcliff Street 

Bristol 

BSi 6HU 

United Kingdom 

Phone: +44 117 929 9733 

Fax: +44 117 929 9251 

www.snsys.com 

Booth 1022 

Since 1988, SN Systems has been setting the 

standards for development tools within the 

console industry. As new platforms appear we 

are able to create our tools to work with the 

new target. Around the world, SN's tools have 

become the leading development system on 

several console platforms and programmers 

throughout Europe, the USA and Japan have 

been using them for many years. 

SN Systems are demonstrating their advanced 
optimizing C/C++ Compiler, which provides 
comprehensive language support for MIPS- 
based consoles. ProDG for MIPS R4000 
development tools consist of the SN C/C++ 
compiler, assembler, linker and debugger. 
ProView Plus, a post-mortem debugger for 
Sony's DTL-H30io*LT series, helps developers 
find bugs that only appear on the retail 
console. 

SOFTIMAGE Co. 

3510 St. Laurent Boulevard 
Montreal, Quebec H2X 2V2 
Canada 

Phone:514-845-1636 
Fax: 514-845-5676 
www.softimage.com 
Booth 1528 

The Softimage family of products offers end- 
to-end solutions for the games/interactive 
market. Whether it is SOFTIMAGE®|XSI®, the 
only truly non-linear 3-D production 
environment or SOFTIMACE|BEHAVIOR™, the 
first scalable, fully programmable crowd 
simulation and behavioral animation system, 
Softimage tools are always on the cutting 
edge of the new real. 

SOFTIMAGE®|XSI® is the industry's only true, 
nonlinear 3-D production solution and the 
answer to all content creation and pipeline 
deployment needs. The modeling and 
character animation tools in SOFTIMAGE|XSI 
let artists and developers make better art - 
faster. 

Sony Computer Entertainment America 

919 East Hillsdale Boulevard 
Foster City, CA 94404 
Phone: 650-655-8000 
Fax: 650-655-5511 
www.playstation.com 
Booth 1308 



Sony Computer Entertainment America (SCEA) 
markets the PlayStation® family of products 
and develops, publishes, markets, and 
distributes software for the PS one™ console 
and the PlayStation®2 computer 
entertainment system for the North American 
market. Based in Foster City, California, SCEA is 
a wholly owned subsidiary of Sony Computer 
Entertainment Inc. 

More than 70 million PlayStation®2 computer 
entertainment systems have shipped 
worldwide since its launch in Japan on March 
4, 2000. PlayStation®2 continues to grow 
strongly, securing its place as the digital 
entertainment platform of choice in homes 
around the world. 

Sony Computer Entertainment America 

Booth CP 1825 

Sony Computer Entertainment America Inc. 
(SCEA) markets the PlayStation® family of 
products and develops, publishes, markets, and 
distributes software for the PS one™ console 
and the PlayStation®2 computer 
entertainment system for the North American 
market. Based in Foster City, California, SCEA 
serves as headquarters for all North American 
operations. 

With more and more exclusive titles 
developed for the PS one console and the 
PlayStation 2 computer entertainment system, 
new game peripherals, innovative marketing, 
and competitive pricing programs in place, the 
simple goal is to push the edge that gamers 
have come to expect from the PlayStation 
brand. 

Sony Ericsson 

7700 West Parmer Lane 
Austin, Texas 78729 
Phone: 512-996-5300 
Fax:512-995-5405 
www.sonyericsson.com/developer 
Booth 628 

Metrowerks and Sony Ericsson empower 
developers with tools, knowledge and 
technology. CodeWarrior offers the broadest 
suite of development options for PS2, 
GAMECUBE™, Game Boy™ Advance and 
wireless devices. Sony Ericsson arms 
developers with documentation, tools, 
training, and technical support for wireless 
game development. Metrowerks and Sony 
Ericsson - Enabling Evolutionary Game 
Development. (Metrowerks - 
www.metrowerks.com/games, Sony Ericsson 
www.sonyericsson.com/developer) 

Sony Online Entertainment 

8g28Terman Court 
San Diego, CA 92121 



Phone: 858-577-3306 
www.sonyonline.com 
Booth CP 1938 

Sony Online Entertainment Inc. (SOE), the 
online gaming division of Sony Pictures Digital 
Entertainment, is a worldwide leader in 
massively multiplayer online gaming that 
creates, develops and provides online 
entertainment for the personal computer, 
console, wireless, and online markets. 

In addition to blockbuster hits EverQuest®, 
PlanetSide™, Star Wars Galaxies™, 
PlayStation®2, EverQuest®,Online 
Adventures™, SOE has an array of cutting- 
edge online games in development.and the 
highly anticipated EverQuest® II. 

Soundelux DMG 

7080 Hollywood Boulevard, Suite 100 

Hollywood, CA 90028 

Phone:323-603-5109 

Fax: 323-603-5101 

www.soundeluxdmg.com 

Booth 1048 

Soundelux Design Music Group - for over 10 

years we have been creating some of your 

favorite game sound tracks: Return to Castle 

Wolfenstein, Ghost Recon, Rainbox 6, Quake 

II and III, Lineage II, Devil May Cry I and II, etc... 

we've also been creating your favorite film 

sound design: Black Hawk Down, Gladiator, 

Perfect Storm, Kill Bill Vol. 2, 2 Fast 2 Furious, 

etc. ..Come by our booth (1048) and meet us! 

Storm Front Studios 

4040 Civic Center Drive 

San Rafael, CA 94903 

Phone: 415-479-2800 

Fax:415-479-2880 

www.stormfrontstudios.com 

Booth CP1922 

Stormfront Studios develops top quality, 

award-winning entertainment products for 

PS2, Xbox and. Recent titles: The Lord of the 

Rings: The Two Towers (PS2 & Xbox for EA), 

and Atari's upcoming Forgotten Realms. 

Founded in 1988, Stormfront owns all of the 

engines and technology in its games. The 

company is based in San Rafael, California. 

Stottler Henke Assoc, Inc. 

951 Mariner's Island Boulevard, Suite 360 

San Mateo, CA 94404 

Phone: 650-931-2700 

Fax: 650-931-2701 

www.simbionic.com 

Booth 1348 

Founded in 1988, Stottler Henke applies 

artificial intelligence techniques to solve 

problems that defy solution using traditional 

approaches. The company delivers compre- 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of GDC 2004. 



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EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



« 



hensive software solutions for a variety of military and commercial 
applications. Our software tools and technologies simplify and 
accelerate the development of game Al, intelligent simulations, and 
training systems. 

SimBionic™ is a powerful, visual Al middleware tool that enables game 
developers to easily create more realistic, challenging, and engaging 
behaviors for game characters. By accelerating development and 
encouraging collaboration, SimBionic frees your team to spend more 
time on what they do best: innovating tomorrow's games. 

Sun Microsystems, Inc. 

4220 Network Circle, USCA22-316 

Santa Clara, CA 95054 

Phone:408-276-7513 

Fax:408-276-7513 

www.sun.com/software 

Booth 1028 

Since its inception in 1982, a singular vision -The Network is The 

Computer - has propelled Sun Microsystems, Inc. (Nasdaq: SUNVV) to its 

position as a leading provider of industrial-strength hardware, software, 

and services that make the Net work. Sun can be found in more than 

100 countries and on the World Wide Web. 

Superscape 

131 Calle Iglesia, Suite 200 

San Clemente, CA 92672 

Phone: 949-940-2855 

Fax:949-940-2841 

www.superscape.com 

MP 1330 

Superscape specialises in the development of industry-standard 3D 

technology for the over-the-air delivery of 3D games and other 

applications to wireless devices. Its Swerve™ solution has already been 

endorsed by major industry players including Siemens, Motorola, 

Samsung, Activision and Sony Pictures Mobile as their solution of choice 

for delivering console quality, 3D applications to mobile devices. 

Swerve™ is the world's first commercially available implementation of 
the Mobile 3D Graphics API for J2ME™ (JSR 184). It is also available as a 
Qualcomm BREW extension. The Swerve solution comprises a 3D engine 
(Swerve Client), a development tool fully integrated into 3ds max™ 
(Swerve Studio) and a large catalogue of high-profile 3D Java and BREW 
games (Swerve Content). 

Tapwave 

1901 Landings Drive 
Mountain View, CA 94043 
Phone: 650-960-1817 
Fax: 650-960-1317 
www.tapwave.com 
Booth 1424 & MR 4404 

Pioneers of a new category, mobile entertainment gear.Tapwave(tm) is 
changing the way people live, play and interact on the go. Founded in 
May 2001, Tapwave is a privately funded startup company in Mountain 
View, CA. Through a wealth of experience and strong partnerships, 
Tapwave recently launched the Zodiac™ console. An innovative next- 
generation product tailored to deliver the most fun and function in 
mobile entertainment gear. More information about the company can 
be found on the Internet at www.tapwave.com. 

Zodiac™ - the world's first true mobile entertainment console - is the 
perfect combination of fun and functionality in a sleek package you will 
want to take everywhere! Built on the Palm OS® (5.2T), the Zodiac is a 



gaming console, with a full MP3 player, photo viewer, full motion video 
playback and organizer. There are two available models: Zodiac 1 includes 
32MB of RAM and the Zodiac 2 includes 128MB of RAM. 

Tech Excel 

3675 Mt. Diablo Boulevard, Suite 200 

Lafayette, CA 94549 

Phone:925-871-3900 

Fax:925-871-3991 

www.techexcel.com 

Booth 1540 

DevTrack is a Web-based defect- and project-tracking tool for software 

development teams. DevTrack tracks and manages defects, change 

requests, feature enhancements, and all other development issues. 

DevTrack provides workflow and process automation features, detailed 

searching and reporting, all configured with a comprehensive point-and- 

click administration tool. 

Testing- Testing 123 

4124148th Ave NE 

Redmond WA 98052 

Phone:888-718-0837 

Fax:425-895-1496 

www.TT123.com 

Booth 439 

Testing Testing 123 empowers our customers to produce superior 

software by providing quality testing services at an affordable price. We 

can test all platforms for anything from payability and functionality to 

TRC, TCR and Lot-check pre-certification. Testing Testing 123 can increase 

your efficiency and improve your bottom line. 

3Dconnexion, Inc. 

180 Knowles Drive, Suite 100 
Los Catos, CA 95032 
Phone:408-376-2500 
Fax:408-376-2525 
info@3dc0nnexion.com 
www.3dconnexion.com 
Booth 1544 

3Dconnexion, a Logitech Company, designs and manufactures a line of 
motion controllers giving animators and artists the power of a two- 
handed work-style. With one hand on the controller and the other on 
the mouse, this two-handed work-style let animators and artists 
become fully immersed in the scene being designed. 

The SpaceBall 5000 is 3Dconnexion's premier motion controller with 
support for over 120 application, including 3ds max, BodyPaint 3D, 
Cinema 4D, Maya, MOTIONBUILDER, Photoshop and many more. The 
SpaceBall 5000 supports a new optical sensor, 12 programmable buttons 
and full plug-and-play compatibility. 

Tooned In, Inc. 

218 Broadway E., Suite 202 

Seattle, WA 98102 

Phone: 206-323-1426 

Fax: 206-323-1427 

www.toonedin.com 

Booth 1345 

Since 1994, Tooned In, Inc. has produced award-winning animation for 

games, film and television. Our talented team of artists and software 

developers combine traditional artistry and advanced digital 

technologies to produce truly innovative interactive entertainment. 



L 



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EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS 



Trymedia Systems 

1516 Folsom Street 

San Francisco, CA 94103 

Phone:415-255-3060 

Fax:415-255-0910 

www.trymedia.com 

www.trygames.com 

Booth 844 

Trymedia Systems' ActiveMARK™ Technology 

and Web Services provide leading developers, 

publishers, portals and retailers with seamless 

software and game distribution solutions. 

Content packaged with ActiveMARK may be 

distributed via any channel and sold using any 

business model, enabling developers to 

protect and monetize their content from CD 

to the web with a single solution. The 

company also operates the world's largest B2B 

marketplace for downloadable software and 

games -The Trymedia Network - delivering 

35+ million downloads to 3,000+ affiliates in 

30+ countries. Founded in 1999, Trymedia 

Systems is headquartered in San Francisco. 

Trymedia's ActiveMARK'" Technology and Web 
Services enable game developers and 
publishers to make their products available to 
consumers with a single protection solution 
that works for CD/DVD-ROMs at retail as well 
as via download. ActiveMARK provides 
unmatched security, simplicity and consumer 
friendliness without significant impact on the 
development cycle. And, when files are shared 
between users - by CD/DVD, Email, Peer-to- 
Peer, IM or any other method - they revert to 
trial mode, creating a new sales opportunity 
with each trade. Visit our booth or our 
sponsored security track (Wednesday) to get a 
first-hand look at ActiveMARK. 

Ubisoft 

5505 Boulevard St. -Laurent, Suite 5000 

Montreal, QC H2T 16 

Canada 

Phone: 514-812-8247 

Fax: 514-490-0882 

www.ubi.com 

Booth 2042 

Ubisoft is an international producer, publisher, 

and distributor of interactive entertainment 

products. Founded in 1986 in France, Ubisoft is 

now present on every continent, both through 

offices in 21 different countries including the 

United States, Canada, Romania, Germany, and 

China and through sales of products in over 

50 countries. To learn more, visit 

www.ubi.com. 

UK Trade & Investment 

British Consulate-General 
1 Sansome Street, Suite 850 



San Francisco, CA 94104 
Phone:415-617-1300 
Fax:415-434-2018 
www.tradeinvestusa.com 
MP 1330-7 

UK Trade & Investment is the U.K. government 
organization that supports both companies in 
the United Kingdom trading internationally, 
and overseas enterprises seeking to locate in 
the U.K. We are pleased to announce our 
support for UK wireless technology and game 
developers at this year's GDC conference. 
Through our 14 offices in the United States, 
UKTI aims to exploit market opportunities to 
expand the dynamic business relationships 
between our two countries. For more 
information about UK companies attending 
this year's event, please contact Carrie Ann 
Schiller, Vice Consul, at 415-859-1860 or stop by 
our booth on the expo floor. 

Vancouver Film School 

200-198 W. Hastings Street 

Vancouver, BCV6B1H2 

Canada 

Phone:604-685-5808 

Fax: 640-685-5836 

www.vfs.com 

Booth 445 

Careers in Gaming from VFS. VFS delivers 

immersive, hands-on education in 

entertainment production and visual arts, 

including industry-endorsed training for 

gaming disciplines. Guided by industry 

leaders, VFS provides an intensive, hands-on 

curriculum determined through consultation 

with Advisory Boards of working professionals 

- providing students with a decided 

advantage in the workplace. 

VFS offers five programs designated by big 

game companies as superior choices for game 

development training: 3D Animation, Maya, 2D 

Animation, Interactive Media and Sound 

Design for Visual Media. Each has a different 

focus, so students can pick their own path in 

gaming - and get there in one intense year. 

Vicarious Visions 

350 Jordan Road 

Troy, NY 12180 

Phone: 518-283-4090 

Fax: 518-283-4095 

www.vvisions.com 

Booth CP 1942 

Vicarious Visions, a leading independent game 

development studio, has gained critical 

acclaim with hit titles for top brands such as 

Tony Hawk's Pro Skater™, Spider-Man®, 

Crash Bandicoot®, SpongeBob Square 

Pants® and Star Wars®. VV games are known 

for pushing technical boundaries to deliver 



addictive gameplay and immersive art that 
bring favorite characters and worlds to life for 
portable, console, and PC gamers. Vicarious 
Visions is also home to the pioneering 
Intrinsic Alchemy® middleware technology 
and tools, which are being used to power hit 
titles in development at Activision, Konami, 
Sega, Vivendi Universal Games and other 
studios worldwide. 

VIRTOOLS 

93 rue Vieille du Temple 

75 003 Paris 

France 

Phone: +33 1 42 71 46 86 

Fax: +33 1 42 71 86 53 

www.virtools.com 

Booth 1712 

Founded in 1993, Virtools provides game 

studios and industrial clients with the 

technology they need to develop complex, 

high-quality 3D games in record time. Many 

clients and partners like Electronic Arts, 

Microsoft, Dreamcatcher, Warner Bros Online 

and Microids have already chosen Virtools Dev 

to create prototypes and complete games in 

record time. 

Virtools Dev is the most comprehensive 
development platform for prototyping, online 
game and rapid time to market PC/Xbox and 
Mac games. The new Dev 3.0 will be shown at 
GDC: - Introduction of the shaders - 
Integration with NxN Alienbrain - New action 
managers - And much more... 

Waves 

306 W. Depot Avenue 

Knoxville.TN 37917 

Phone: 865-909-9200 

www.waves.com 

Booth 1447 

Waves is the world leader in signal processing 

tools to audio professionals. Its limiters, EOs, 

effects and noise reduction tools are used on 

the majority of major music, movie soundtrack 

and game titles. 

Waves will be demonstrating new tools for 

developers and discussing also the benefit of 

implementing Waves technologies such as 

MaxxBass in audio reproduction equipment 

for video games. 



See gamasutra.com for daily coverage of CDC 2004. 



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SCHEDULE AT-A-GLANCE 









Tutorials/ 

IGDA Business 

Summit 

10am-6pm 

Lunch 
12:30-2pm 



MONDAY MARCH 22 

Registration Open 8am-4pm 

9-10am 
10-llam 

11am-12pm 
12-1pm 

1-2pm 

2-3pm 

3-4pm 

4-5pm 

5-6pm 

6-7pm 

7-8pm 

8-9pm 

9- 10pm 

10-11pm 

11pm-12am 



TUESDAY MARCH 23 

Registration Open 9am-4pm 



9-10am 

10-11am 

11am-12pm 

12-1pm 

1-2pm 

2-3pm 

3-4pm 

4-5pm 

5-6pm 

6-7pm 



Tutorials/ 

IGDA Business 

Summit 

10am-6pm 

Lunch 
12:30-2pm 



7-8pm 


Game Room 

7pm-12am 


8-9pm 


9- 10pm 


10-11pm 
11pm-12am 



9-10am 

10-11am 

11am-12pm 

12-1pm 

1-2pm 

2-3pm 

3-4pm 

4-5pm 

5-6pm 

6-7pm 

7-8pm 

8-9pm 

9- 10pm 



10-1lpm 

11pm-12am 



WEDNESDAY MARCH 24 

Registration Open 7:30am-6:30pm 



GDC Conference 
Sessions 

9am - 6:30pm 

Lunch 

1 -2:30pm 




Expo Suites 

9am- 
Expo Floor 6:30pm 
11:30am- 

6:30pm 



Independent 
Games 
Festival 

11:30am- 
6:30pm 



Independent Games Festival & 
Game Developers Choice Awards Ceremony 

6:30-9:30pm 



Game Room 

7pm-12am 



9-10am 

10-11am 

11am-12pm 

12-1pm 

1-2pm 

2-3pm 

3-4pm 

4-5pm 

5-6pm 

6-7pm 

7-8pm 

8-9pm 

9- 10pm 

10-11pm 

11pm-12am 



THURSDAY MARCH 25 

Registration Open 8:30am-6:30pm 



GDC Conference 
Sessions 

9am-5:15pm 



Expo Suites 

9am-6:30pm 



Lunch 1 -3pm 
IGDA Meeting 

1:15-2:45pm 



Booth Crawl 

5:15-6:30pm 



Expo Floor 

11:30am- 
6:30pm 



GDC 
Independent Mobile 
Games 9am- 6pm 
Festival 

11:30am- 
6:30pm 




FRIDAY MARCH 26 

jistration Open 8:30am-3:30pm 




Independent 
Games 
Festival 

11:30am- 

3:30pm 



GDC 

Mobile 

9am- 6pm 




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77ie Miles Sound System provides the most sophisticated sound 
for the PC, Mac, Xbox, and Linux. It supports 2D, 3D, streaming, 
MIDI with DLS, the world's fastest MP3 decoder (with patent 
rights), internet voice chat, software reverb, and much more! 

Pixomatic Is our powerful software rendererfor PCs. Essentially, 
it is a high -end DX7 video card in software form! MMX, 3DNow, 
and SSE optimized assembly is generated at run-time. Don't let 
low-end hardware or bad video drivers hurt your game's sales! 

Cranny is a powerful toolkit for building all kinds of interactive 
3D applications, it features the most efficient and flexible 
content exporters, data manipulation, normal mapping and 
run-time dynamic 3D animation system you'll find anywhere. 

Bink is the finest video codec for games! It provides better than 
DVD quality at half the data rate along with a perceptually 
lossless 10:1 audio codec in a simple and clean API. It is available 
for PC, Mac, xbox, CameCube, Linux, and now Sony Playstation 





THE BEST IN CAME DEVELOPMENT TECHNOLOGY 
www.radgametools.com 425.893.4300 



GAME TOOLS